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The Virgi n ia Beach 

56tliYMr.No.31.yinliiiailMch.Vi. ^k— ^ AwMtMMl 



VlR&lNl^ STAT6 UlBR'^RY 
SERlAtS SECTION 

RICHMOND ^'^ *'* 




Eddie's 

Franchise 

Extended 

ByLeeCahiU 

SunRqxMtff 

Ocean Eddie's, the res- 
taurant and bar on the 
Virginia Beach Fishing 
Pier, can make all the 
noise it wwits-so long as 
the sound remains inside 
the establishment. 

Elkan Lachman, who 
with his son Eddie oper- 
ates the establishment, 
told Virginia Beadi Qty 
Council Monday that he 
was sound-proofing and 
air ccmditioning the res- 
taurant to keep the music 
from the restaurant from 
drifting to the nearby 
hotels. 

In view of the altera- 
tions, Council renewed its 
franchise agreement with 
the Virginia Beach Fish- 
ing Pier, Inc. to permit the 
pier owners access over 
public easement to the 
pier. That is, if the Ker 
. and amusement company, 
which operates the 
restaurant, will not itself 
conduct or permit others 
to conduct or permit 
others to conduct any 
loudspeakers, dancing, 
noise or other sounds 
which are audible outside 
the structures on the jAv. 
- Jdhn Vakos, owner of 
the Sandcastle Hotel near- 
by, had asked couiuil not 
to renew the franchise and 
to give it to V^os, in- 
stead. Vakos complained 
that the noise coming 
from the restaurant 
(Uve entertainment) k^ 

ing; IfesaS ffhe i»ad the 
A^mctuse, for which he 
was willing to pay $10,000 
a year, he would operate 
(mly the fishing pier. 

Qosed up. of course, 
the restaurant would lose 
(See Ocean, PMelOf 




nc Before School Board 





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Are Student Span 
Effective or Medieval ? 



Thomas MMcheH 






t^^l/SW^"-' 



ThMHH MHMd of Vtifliila Beach was oac of wvmd w^^^^ hndcd 
Hm vailbi wMIe Hihfatg North CWroUiia Ovter Bttdts waters iMt wwkend. 
MUehcBf m «vM fltkeman for y^an, had never can^t DM irf the Ug iblini- 
II SaM»*v i^M he pnflcd this ^ pboDdcr aboard tke Mutti Fever cmMBf 

oatef<>i«toBMet 



, ByMlkeOooding 

I SunStafrWriter 

The pr»:tice (rf corporal punishment in ^%ginia 
Reach's 37 public schods will be discussed at the next 

reeling of the sclrod board, Tuesday, August 17 at 2 
m. at Providence Elementary School. 
i Discussion of the matter will take place at the request 
©f board member John Fahey, whose interest in the 
tepic was re-kindled at a conference he attended last 
April. 

In a letter to Virginia Beadi aty Public Schods 
Superintendent E. E. Brickell, Fahey called COTpwal 

tunishment "medieval" and said he "would vote fw 
s removal from the system." 
. Fahey said he became convinced to introduce 
iscussion aa. the matter fdlowing his attendance at the 
nd Annual Confererwe of the National School Board 
sociation in Atfamta. According to Fahey, Chester G. 
hultz, an attwney and member of the Gettysburg 
^hool Board, recommended a number of changes in 
^ginia Beach Schodi Board policy. Fahey, in turn, 
suggested the fdlowing items regarding corporal 
punishment be addressed by the board: 

• Whether it should be administered to a student by 
persons of the same or opposite sex. 

• Whether regulations should ensure that the reason 
for paddling is given to the student with an opportunity 
for response. 

' • Whether parents who desire should be given the 
opportunity to twvapi their children from corporal 
punishment. 

At the July Schod Board meeting Fahey attempted to 
change the board's current pdicy on search and seizure 
practices. The motion failed to receive a second and 
was formally tabled. Brickell was advised, however, to 
consult an attorney on the matter lot further 
investigation. Fahey said that for the copwal 
punislnnent issue, however, there will be no moti(Mis 
fOT reWsion (tf policies. He wishes merely to discuss the 
matter, he said. 

$chod Board pdicy 3134,3, according to pubBc 
t^formirtionoii6fcrfei^l»»w<!!at; il t ttorth at ' Wiwfi ri 
punishment as a disciplinary procedure is not 
encouraged. However, af^r other corrective measures 
have been taken and found ineffective^ coipwal 
punishnunt may be used." 

Lowenthal said the administrative regulation cont- 
ains a number of provisions which clarify the pdicy. 
These provisions were added, he said, two years ago. 
The main body of the policy was adc^ted in October, 



1969. The five stipulati<Mis are: 

• A principal has to make a reasonable effort to notify 
the parents befwe caporal punishment is administer- 
ed. 

• COTporal punishment is not to be administered to a 
student whose health would be adversely affected. 

• Corporal punishment is to be administered in the 
privacy of a closed ofBce, and witnessed by at least one 
professional member of the staff. 

• The parent or guardian must be notified in each 
instance. 

• The principal is to keep a record of the use of 
cOTporal punishment, including all pertinent informa- 
tion, and notify the schod board of each case. 

Robert P. StenzhOTn, assistant superintendent for 
supportive services, said his office spent some six 
months researching the changes in the policy. "We 
surveyed 16,000 parents, students, teachers, central 
office persrainel, and principals to come up with the 
new regulations," he said. "Even though we don't 

(See Board, Page 3) 




JoBcs Henlejr 

Look Inside! 

The Working Relationship between Mayor Louis 
Jones and Vice Mayor Barbara Henley - Page 3 




Sunburn Pain Can Be Avoided 



Coagratutottag flit. o. fch .Wf N«k»> as vice pitrtdent ^ De^ColtaboradvePro^^ 

^«^m^^Tm^Si^t1l>*mwfoMM.ot€mam^*mBmlA. "It coaftaa. offlcW^-iy unof- 
fidilitttf. Mrre«M»M*iMWta»elMr«Medovertl»ye«f»,aiidlhboflfclrilyi«opriiM 

Solar l^pert Fitts Becomes Officer 




d J. Fitts, AIA, 
itfosdte 

sen ^dniri 



be. mMm ^ 




_ M4MI 

^aI* Biw for ^4wt 
giPMn #li«, duri^ i^di 

teve iiKhi^tod winni^ 
fhvt t^^ in the 1978 



Pusive Solar Residential 
Dti^n Competitioo spon- 
MMd by HUWDCK. He 
noHt Uves in tlK home 
based on those plans. 

He iMH ^Wished two 
pm^ert for the U. S. 
Otp^UMitt Gi &Mrgy, 
one of vMdi wlU be 
presented m. the i^^jceed- 
ing s ci the 1982 Nttkxwl 
PMthrt Sdw ^^n^ Con- 
Umu» la KKKvUe, TN. 

Mchard has been a 



frequent lecturer at The 
Design Cdlaborative's 
Sdar Seminars over tin 
last four years, having 
attested numerous conft- 
nnoci and lemmwrs on 
the lastest materials used 
m eiwrgy efflcfent ar^t- 
ecture aiKl oantruction. 

At a naember of the 
Tidewater Sdar Energy 
Assodatkn, Richard wu 
initt^MMdla tte (xtipft- 
Tttion of sivnuK m. 



.. nt .»!.. K 



anu 



and office bt^ldings test 
May 1. Ifis mn Iksm 
iras one <tf those c^en to 
the puUk: and the media. 



A grwluate <^ the Uni- 
versity ctfMkAttaa Schod 
(tf Architecture, Richard 
served two jwars as a 
commissiaied dficer in 
the U. S. Army at Fort 
Eustis, Virginia l^fore 
auritog his hooM in Nor- 
foOt. 



For those who think lobster red skin is the only 
repercussion from overexposure to the sun, think 
again. In extreme cases, death can be the result, 
according to Dr. Tommy Sun, a staff physician at the 
Green Run Family Practice Clinic at the Green Run 
Medical Center. 

For most visitors to the gdden surf of Virginia Beach, 
however, the sun's daimage will nd be so severe. Still, 
with the aid of a little common sense. Dr. Sun says, the 
discomfort and irritation of sunburn can be avdded. 

Sunbathers out for the first time in a summer season 
"should limit their exposure to direct sunlight to 20 
minutes per day," Sun says. "I know people cane to 
the beach with the idea (Scramming m as much sun as 
they can in a few days, but that can be dangerous if 
you're nd careful." 

Instead, first-timen should increase their daily 
exposure gradually. Sun says. Further, they should 
completely avdd being in the sun between 1 1 a.m. and 
3 p.m.. Sun says, because "that is when the sun is the 
most direct." Also, Sun recommends a powerfiil sun 
screen to block out dangerous ultravidet rays the sun 
emits. 

Persons most likely to develop sunburn are those 
with frdr skin, light cdored hair, and blue eyes. Sun 
says. "Those are the types who are really gdng to 
suffer if they don't watdi it," he adds. Sun points out 
that anyone, regardless of skin pigmentation can run 
into problems if they stay out in the sun for too long. 
Heat strdce, he says, can strike uiyone. 

Sun says he deals with two types of skin disorders 
which result fttwi too mudi sun ~ actite and chronic. 
"We wo-ry initially about redctening oithe skin and the 
oodag of fluid from blisters," Sun says. "If you get a 
signifigant bum, you can run into all kiiKls of prdslems 
from nausea to shock to death if the bum is extensive 
eiMJugh and deep enough." 

For bums of this proportion, emergency room 
treatment and hospitalization are re«nunended. Sun 
says. "We wouW treat these type of peofrie just as we 
woukl wy other bum patient." 

Secondly, Sun says, there are chronic bum patients, 
those who are engaged in ojostant, repeated exposure 
to the sun. In Virginia Beach, outdoor workers woukl 
be a prime exampte. Sun says. "Om of the initud aiwl 
most common resulte of dwjoic overejqxBure is solar 
elastosis." Sun says. "Tbat m Uke «Ai«t we comoKnly 
see in d(kr peofde ~ wrinldy skbi, discotaration of 
ixgmentation." 

A secondary stage of dvoidc overexposure n at^imc 
keratoses. "The sUa cells devetap into itdri^. red. 
scaly lesions," Stan says» Besfafe tlw obvious cosmetic 
d»(^nifort. Sim says tUs sMge d develo^nent 
IHesente a real danger. "Ai^tek keratoses is. in many 




Dr. Sun suggests fair-skin people not sun- 
bathe between the hours of 1 1 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

cases, premalignant to cancer." Among the cancer 
strains one could develop here. Sun says are squamous 
cell cancer, basil cell cancer, and the highly deadly 
mahgnant melonoma. 

Most sunbathers will be spared of this kind of 
damage. Sun says. "Only one percent of all cancers 
discovered per year in the United States are of this 
nature," he says. Fw the rest of us, Sun says a 
homemade paste of crushed asprin mixed with an 
antacid such as Malox and spread over the burnt area 
wiU suffice. "Such a compaind, surprising, will work 
wonders. Sun says. Further, Sun applauds such 
shai-term relief products as Sdarcaine. "It provides 
immediate codness, which is really the Mily thing a 
sunbumed perscm wants anyhow." 

The most COTnmon reasrai pec^le get burned, Sun 
says, is because they fall asleep on the beach. "I had a 
guy come in one time, he was burned cm over 40 
percent of his body," Sun relates. "He had been 
wearing just a pair of cut-offs, and he was in real pain. 
He came to me all dehydrated with a load of blisters. I 
suggested he go to the emergency rocHn." 

Sun says people are ignwant of the facts when it 
ames to the sun. "They think that 20 minutes in the 
sun is nothing, so they lay there unprotected fw an 
hour," Sun says. "They don't realize how much 
damage the sun can do in just 20 minutes. They also 
have to reali2e the tanning effect is delayed. So, after 
an hour, they look down at their sldn and don't n«i<» 
any changes in cdor. They forget that the 
irigBMntation process takes up to 12 hairs to start." 
Sun adds that one can become severely bumed on 
o^^rcMt days and in the dead rfwirter as well. 

For beadi sunbathers, though, &m questions the 
value of a nice tan. "They are making themselves lode 
nice now in their youth, but they'll pay for it down the 
road when they have wrinkly, ugly skin," Sun warns. 



■a 



/ 



2 Virginia Beadi Sun. A^uit 4. 1982 

Sun Commentary 



Editorials 



Spare the Rod 



Corporal punishment is an act of last 
te&OTi within the Virginia Beach school 
system. With more than 55,000 students 
attending the city's 57 public schools, 
only 62 cases of corporal punishment 
were reported to the School Board last year 

Perlutps those 62 cases were 62 too 
many. 

Granted, the School Board advises 
against the use of paddling to correct 
behavioral problems. But, the fact 
remains that a policy is still on the books 
which allows for adults to strike children. 

Child psychiatrists as a group have 
repeatedly spoken out against corporal 
punishment in the schools. The National 
Education Association noted the 
following general conclusions about 
physical punishment in a recent task force 
report: 

"Physical punishment is most often 
used on students who are physically 
weaker and smaller than the teacher. 
Physical punishment is often a sympton 
of frustration rather than a disciplinary 
procedure. Physical punishment develops 



aggressive hostiUty. The use of physical 
punishment inclines everyone in the 
school conununity to regard students as 
less than human and the school as 
dehumanizing." 

Cities such as Boston, Baltimore, 
Chicago, New York, Philaddphia, San 
Francisco and Washington, Vk C. have 
banned corporal punishment, as have the 
countries of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, 
Finland, Israel, Japan, and all communist 
block nations. A 1978 survey of the 59 U. 
S. school districts which had eliminated 
corporal punishment found that only one 
of them reported an increase in 
disciplinary problems. 

School Board member John Fahey has 
hit the nail on the head in labeling cor- 
poral punishment "medieval." Even 
though it is not used often in Virginia 
Beach, corporal punishment is still there 
when authorities deem it necessary. 
Perhaps Virginia Beach should follow the 
lead of other cities in America, apd 
vote to eliminate corporal punishment 
when the school board next meets. M. M. G. 



Man VS. Machine 



There are over 600,000 employees on 

the United States Postal Service payroll, 

459 of whom are in Virginia Beach. The 

U. S. P. S. generates $20 billion annually, 

with $10 million of it contributed by 

Virginia Beach. U. S. P. S. yearly profits 

now range between $100 and $200 

millio n. 
^What are they doing with all the gelt? 

They're building computers, investing 
in technology, providing better service to 
customers at the lowest possible cost. By 
turning to autcMnation, twice the volume 
of mail can be processed in half the time 
by hiftlf the manpower. The postal service 
is already computerized, but with new 
"optic readers,*' machines will be able to 
decipher zip codes on envelopes, code and 
sort them; tasks now performed by 
humans. 

Such a transition is invidious to the 



postal unions. Postal handlers and clerks, 
whose jobs are the most threatened by 
continued modernization of postal 
equipment, argue that machines foul up 
too often. Unless a letter goes through 
perfectly flat, they argue, the machine will 
jam. Plus, they say, the machines will gag 
on handwritten zip codes.^ ^ 

The counterveiling forces of man versus 
machine will conflict more regularly as we 
approach the year 2,000. As it nears, men 
and women in all lines of. work ynXL feel a 
sense of job insecurity. Many feel it now. 

The Postal Service says no employees 
will lose their jobs as metal and lights take 
the place of eyes and brains. Attrition 
will pave the way to the future. 

At the end of that road, like it or not, 
are the white cold halls of the 21st Cen- 
tury. - G. D. G. 



Water 



Last summer was dry, water-conserving 
restrictions were unposed. This summers 
to the farmer's delight, it's wet. Reser- 
voirs are filled and local residents may, 
without feeling guilty, freely wash their 
cars and lawns. 

When the rains come and water is 
abundant, there is not as much 
widespread concern over the future of 
Virginia Beach's water supply. There is 
worry, however, but mostly from Virginia 
Beach Chamb^ of Commerce officials 
and City Coundl numbers. 

Councihnan J. Henry McCoy, Jr., was 
in the mayor's seat when arrid times 
dusted Virginia Beach. Now Mayor Louis 
Jones has to breathe it. 

Virginia Beach has no water system of 
its own but does have a projected thi*rst 
for 52 million gallons of it daily be the 
year 2,032. Rumor has it that the city is 
leaning toward a prq;>osal which would 
dam the Assomoosick Swamp in Sussex 



County, producing 65 million gallons of 
water a day to the region. But under this 
system, the city's water needs would only 
be filled for the next 50 years! What hap- 
pens after that? 

The Army Corps of Engineers is 
preparing its own study of the swamp, 
results of which aren't due out until 1984. 

Some people feel that even then, the 
Virginia Beach might not have steered a 
clear course to solving this city's water 
question. Others feel we have gone too 
long without a decision. We, however, 
are sure that Virginia Beach city officials 
will nu^ke the right decision, which will 
provide Virginia Beach consumers the 
most water, for the longest time, at the 
least cost. 

Water and time are otpensive. Virginia 
Beach must forge ahead, or sail on, in its 
quest for a permanent water su^ly. But 
just as important as the cost of the water, 
is how long it will last. - G. D. G. 



Ocean Eddie's 



Eddie Lachnuui, proprietor of Ocean 
Eddie's Trofrical Bar on the Virginia 
Beach Fud^ Pl»> dropped by the 
Virginia Beadi Sun last week to discuss 
the latest copy of the nci«papw which 
featured a front i^at story about him and 
his recoit trcwbiet with Oty Cound. 

Lachman ccmceded that incteed, his 
estabUshn^ hmi ^qwd tti nu^ too 
loudly in the fii^. The Atu^oii, te sakl, 
wcnikl so<Mi be reniMtfed. 

**^l€ instalM em^n^ afar conditioning 
^ ^ week tad we'ie dodng up tte 



windows," Lachman said. "If that 
doesn't keep the noise down I don't know 
whatwiU." 

It should be obvious that Lachman and 
his family, wto have owned and op^ated 
the pio* for meat than 30 years, are ddng 
everything they can to get along wtth the 
neighbors and the city. 

Council is to be applauded for 
r«^}gniang this kst Monday, and voting 
to attend tte ftandue to the Ladunaa's 
and thdr a^ociates hi the pto. - M. M. G. 



Letters To The Editor 



A Giant Step in Understanding Problems oftiivorce 



Editor: 

I am writinf as a foUow-up to your reporter Mike 
Gooding's articte entitled "Child Custody" and the 
aocompanying editorial which appeared in the July 14 
issue of the Wginia Be«:h Sun. 

I would like to commend you for the accuracy of the 
article and for the perceptiveness domonstrated ia your 
editorial. 

Wc believe the Family Mediation Program is a g^t 
step forward in understanding the problems of (Unvce 
and in helinng the parties involved deal with their 
problems constructively. 



Your coverage fA tlw Meduitioa Fiogram expluned 
the program effiecttiwb' aad jmivided important 
inteautiaD about ftindamental dianges in the iMiy tUs 
pr^jiea is Wewed ia Mrginia Beadi. 

I hope you will continue to shew laa interest ia sodal 
problems being addressed by the Oty^ uid if I can be of 
assiituoe in diis area, iHease let me kMW. 

WaherB.Qedle. 

Asifstaot Director, 

Virginia Beach Deputment of Social Services 



The New Sun Brings Back Memories 



Editor: 



The'change in the Virginia Beach Sun to the larger coupons and the readable no squint print - aU in all the 
size newspaper was a pleasant surprise - brings back change is reri - nice. 



memories. 
I like the local pictures, community news, the ads. 



Edna M. Cote, 
Norfolk. Va 



Decisions Weaken American Military, Strengthen Enemy 



Editor: 

Winston Churchill once said, "If you will not fight for 
right when you can easUy win without bloodshed; if you 
will not fight when your victory will be sure and not too 
costly; you may come to the moment when you will have 
to fight with all the odds against you and only a 
precarious chance (rf survival." 

What has propelled America ~ in the short span of 
about thirty years ~ firom a pre-eminent position in the 
world to a nation struggling for survival? 

We have seen the centralization of power in 
Washington with its inevitable merge into sOciaUsm. 
We have wiwested poiides that have ' «iA»idBiii«d' 
America militarily md economically while streiigdi- 
ening its enemies. We have seen the perversion of the 
Constitution with a gradual erosion of our fireedoms and 
a distortation (tf the principles upon which our Republic 
was founded. We have seen America rediculed and 
humiliated, its honor trampled, its mU diluted by 
no-win pdicies and appeasement. Policies that have 
brought America to the brink of bankruptcy. 

We have seen that regardless of the party in office - 
conservative or liberal. Democrat or Republican ~ the 
same self-destructive policies remain. 

Are we to accept the "accidental" hypothesis that 
America's consistent and dismal foilures in foreign and 
domestic policies have happened by chance? 

And there is the equally idiotic supposition that 
America's decline is due to the gross stuiridity of its 
leaden. 

Ihere can be only <ne explanation! In the words of 
Franidm Roosevelt, "If something happens in politico, 
you can bet someone planned it that way." 

America stands in greater peril today than ever 
before in its history. This peril has come upon us so 
gradually, it has mounted so slowly, with sudi 
concealment and deception, with {^onuses of peace and 
illusions of hope, that we have been hdled into a fidse 
sense of security. 

l^xn completion of his prepared speech at the 19fl0 
Republican National Convention in Detroit, Senator 
Barry Ooldwater removed his glasses and contuined . . 
."Let me teU you, save it (our Republic), because Ihave 
reached that point in my life . . .where I don't think we 
have much more time. For this might be the last 
RepubUcan Coovetion, and in two weeks, the hut 
Democrat convention . . .Tliere are selfish fixoet 
working for their own interests in our country , . ." 

Who are Uwse "selfish forces" to whkA Senator 
Goldwater n&rs. They are the "lui^en," the 
"Eastern EstabUshment." They are a number of 
interiocked, tax-e»m|M organizations with like belteft 
and common goals. The most powerfiil and influei^ial 
of these organizations is the CouiKil of FoffMn 
Relations which has shaped American thougltt and 
controlled tlw Anwrkan govermnent fa <kaulcsi 

CouncU on Foreign Relations «Ml/or T^U#enl 
Commission memben have served as SecrNJipy of 
State, Defense and TVeasury, Dire(^or, O^^al 
Intelligence Agency. Directar, Amu Cottn^ and 
IXsamuunent Ageiuy in every Admtnktrttkm since 
1953. These in addition to many other key portions m. 
ct^ d tlwse Administrations. 

Althoi^h not a tVi of tlM fecteral govemmeiU, the 



Federal Reserve System has been diaired by members 
<£ the Council on Foreign Relations for (at least) the 
past twenty-nine years. 

Senator Barry Goldwater. in his book "With No 
Apdogies," states . . ."Tte CouacU on Foreign 
Relations is the American Branch of a society which 
orginiitted in England, Intemationalist in viewpoint, 
the CFR. along with tlw Atlantic Ihiian Movement and 
the Atlantic Council of the United &ttes, believes 
national boundaries should be oblitertted and one- 
world rule established." 

Ihe "Cbnstitution for the Newstates of America*' Is 
the foi»ieth verslipn (writidi); f^ ttntereafly tiM laii 
Its wntiiv biigiui in 1(9647^ l^onQht fiapM 6f 
American's are aware of its existence. lis writing took 
place at a tax-exempt foundation with the deceptive 
name. "Center for the Study of Demooratic hostitut- 
ions." 

Colanel Arch Roberts, AUS, (Ret). Nttiooal Director, 
Oxmnittee to Restore the Coiatitiition. stated fai the 
House of Representatives dt bidiana . . ."The 
Newstates Constitution cost twenty-five million dollars. 
The Oemer for tlw Study of Democratic Institutions was 
financed by the Ford aiul Rockefeller Fo u ndati o ns over 
a period often years in the amount of two and one-hidf 
millkn dollars a year." 

The Rockefeller's finaactog of tiie "Newstates 
Constitution" has great iignificanoe since David 
Rodeefelter is Chakman of the Coiiiidl on Foreign 
Relations and the Trilateral Ogaunlssian. 

Thk letter is being seitt (with the endosed copy cf 
Uie Newitittes GansttotioD) hoping aid praj^ tiiitt 
you win share my sense of urgency, my grave comxm 
for America, and my belief that the Amerkin peofile 
miut behifeniwd. 

The eadosed copy of die "Newstates Oonstitvtian" , 
wtt repredwjed from Ookoel Roberts book '^Bamt^ag 
^ruggte for ^ate Sovete^nty," piOyUshed in 1979 1^ 
tiie Betsy Roes Press, 480 Savings Building, Fort 
Odll9s,Ga8(»21. 

Olonel Roberts home phone is l-3<tM84-2S7S, a<lk« 
niMJfeer 1-303-493-2408. 

>yteoin mypossessiA Is the thirty-sevetth stmao. of 
tiiU '^abominatictt," tided "Ooostitittkn for a United 
Re jfiA>|tca of Aa»iiat" eooHdeted In 19^. 

I ^jpeal toyoa todo everytUiW ia you- pOM? to Itelp 
dissaminate infomuttkn m to the existence of thb 
"NMmtates Oonstitittton." If we foil to eiqpote and 
eraiittte this ^^ramiy . . .ootUng else we have or do 
wiUiaatter. 

Ihe American Qe^ m^ "I bette¥e In dte United 
StiMn of America ai a gevaniiaeBC of the people, hy die 
penile, for the peq^, nhoM ^t poMn are derh«d 
friib die consent of die gon^aed . . ." TUs Is tow It 
wis Intended, but tii^teMt how k Is! WemitttatidBe 
contrd of our govenaneitt . . .and our ifestlny! 

If I »m be of tether servioe, or pufti^ additionid 
informatikn, friease don't tatoM to qo^uua me. 

bcktentaily. a copy af ^slead Roberts book 
"Emerging druggie foe Wbm Son^^itty" Is in the 
Ijbnry of Co^pess, 

Panic Wllsoa, 
Norfolk. Va. 



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One Year. •tJS 
Tw«Yean-*12J8 



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Letters Welcome 



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Virginia Be«ch Sun, August 4, 1982 3 



ۥ. 



JPM^ Depend^ on Henley's "Abundance ofE^^erience 



»$ 



ByMikeCkxHliiig 

>'. : . : [ , 

Ihey ccme from two seemingly different worlds, yet 

together, Louis Ray Jams and Bartara Murden Henley 

form a team at the top ct Virginia Beach's 

govemoMntal hieraradiy. 

Jones, the dty's new suiyor, is owner and jn-esittent 
<d Hottomon-BrbWi^ iFttwral Hootts, Inc., Snelinii 
FuneriU itanes, Inc., and Tidewater Cemetary Cor- 
poration. Henley, the city's new vice-nmyor. is a 
former school teacher in OwsapeidGe and Wghiia 
Beach and is presently ^tlu ^oddoeeper for < ttsr 
hwlNmd's iunytaC'imt^^es.- 

How and wh/ifidithii'mortieiatt and this fitfrnetV' 
wife came to hdd the «einb of pia^er^ and what diles 
each hope to act»a|^rttt '" ' 

Jones spent martrtOiao $30^000 to be elected teihe 
Bayside Borough sekf^ocatediby 12-ye«r imnnabeBt 
Oarence HdUand. Ctece elei^d, Jones waged a 
successful campaijgn of winning mayoral votes from his 
chief rivd for the position, at-large coundlman HarcM 
Heisehober.JotieswMietee^d Mayor by his council 
peeris July 1 by a 6-5 margin. 

"It is really a little bit oi several things as to why I 
wanted the job," Jones explained. "First of all, you 
have to feel u though you can do a good job. Ihere has 
to be a little bit of winning s[Hrit. Most successful 
pdUicians have a determiniUion about them. Finally 
there has to be a touch of ego involved in it." 

Nofw that he has been in office formore than a month, 
Jones says he has an uadentanding of the city's m^jor 
challenge. "We have ataKilt totally deflated oflPvMvv^kl 
to the city's water problems," he said. "There is no 
question that water is our number one priority." Jones 
refused to elaborate which way the city is leaning 
regarding development <rfan independent water supply 
for the city's 280,000 residents. "If t said anythmg now 
it might jeopardize an ah-eady touchy issue." he said. 

dther paramount items needing council's attention, 
Jones said, include repair and improvement of the 
city's roads and re-evaluation (tf the city's bw^et. 

In setting out to accomplish these goals. Joms must 
work closely with Qty Nfanager Thomas Muehlenbeck. 
another newcomer to ^rginia Beadi municipal affeirs . 

"My chief j(rt> is to communicate the c<Mncil's wishes 
to the city manager and to use whatever influence the 
title of 'mayi*' has to benefit the community.'^ he said. 
Jones caUed Muehlenbeck a "capable guy" who u 
"obviously decBcated to doing a good job." 

Jones said the press misinterprets many of the 
activities whidi take placie at Qty Council meetings. 

"Just because one councilman disagrees with 
another one doesn't nwan they hate each other." he 
said. "The press does not always know everything 
behind what is. being saU. There is a lot of 
behind-the-scenes stuff going on." 

Jones sai4 he enjoys his life now that he has reached 
his current level of professional success. "I have the 
tm^ to devote to biihg mayor biecause I have been so 

has oeen yean sutce I have done that, I enjoy heing a 
fuoer^ (Urector and assisting |wopfe during their time 
of need and sorrow. I gam a great deal of satis&ction 
helping people." 

Another manner hi which the 46 yev -oU mayor 
gaons siuisfecdon is by lAlappii^ on his Rosiignoi skis 
and hurimg hhnself ctown Colorado mountains. 

"I try to get away abo^t twice a year to do that," 
Jones sakl. "I redly tt^ being aloM out in, the 
mouitidns. I tldnk it is a combinatkn d tiM beaui^ of 
t^ natural enviroiunent coupled with the challenfe of 
going one on one wiA the mountain." 

He^yaGreatHe^ 

When it corms to tte time-co n sumi n g chore ci 
servh^ as the city's diief ceremonial dignteary, 
however, Jones does not make a solo effort. He relies a 




^ 



1 



•I never really sought to be vice mayor.'S At f»«t, some of the others approached me about mnning for mayor, but I rejected that Idea." - Henky 



grei^ deal on his vice-mayor. 

"There have been several occassions already when I 
couldn't be somewhere and Mrs. Henley offered to 
go," Jones said. She has been a great help to mc in 
that I cannot be two places at one time. So far, she has 
been very, very suppoiitive . " v 

loiH^ said he and Henley have "a good working 
mlrtiniMMr " ^f"" a first-termKxiuAc^hnan, said be 
wtftrtdiily heavily on Hentey'e "abundance (^ 
experience." 

While Jones first moved to the Sawpen Prant sectwn 
of \^uiia Beach only five years ago, Henley is a 
Ufeldng resident (rf the Pungo borough, where she was 
bom 39 years ago. 

She and her husband Winston, alwig with their two 
sons Jeff, 11. and Bruce. 7, all take part in the 
day-to-day operation of Henley Farms. The yvx mayor 
said it gets particularly hectic in the months of May and 
Juty. when local residents flock to the farm for 
pick-your-own specials of strawberries and sweet com. 
Green peas, cabbage, soy beans, and wheat are also 

grown there. 

When she is not Harming, Henley splits her tune 
between two other activities: serving as education 
chairman of the Charity United Methodist Church, and 
acth« as vice mayor. 



"1 never ftally sought to be vice mayor," Henley 
said. "At first, some of the others on council 
approached me about running for mayor, but I rejected 
that idea. Then, they asked if I'd consider being vice 
mayor, and I said, 'why not?' I figured if they had 
enough confidence in me, then I ought to take them up 
on it." 

t Henley, a council member since 1978. was elected 
Vice mayor on the secmd ballot, beatuig out new 
councihnan Robert G.Jones. Louis Jones, in his quest 
to become mayor, agreed to support Henley on the 
secoid ballot if his friend. Robert Jones, did not receive 
the necessary votes on the first ballot. 

"It may have loc^d as though there was a lot of 
back-room bargaining going on, but actually, it was not 
that way," Henley said. "Each member of council was 
in the process of making up his mind ai who he could 
and could not support. Obviously, they could not all 
agree." 

Henley explained that she had not made up her mind 
to support Louis Joims until the very end. 

"I was very concerned that he was new to council," 
she said. "Then, one day, we sat down and talked for 
three hours and I determined that he had a lot to offer 
the city. I saw that he had the interest and the time to 
devote to the job. He indicated to me that he was going 



to suppOTt Bob Jones for vice mayor, so you can see that 
it wasn't a 'I'U vote for your if you vote fw me' deal." 

The pubUc minsunderstands Qty Council, Henley 
said, and characterization's of the 11-member body as 
"bickering" are "simply untrue." she said. 

"In my years on council, I just haven't seen it or felt 
it," Henley said. "It disturbs me that people are 
always askii^ mtf,- 'Why can't <3ty Council get along?' 
Anyone irwuld^arttigMyexpect for 11 people hqt to 
completely agree. The Si^ireme Court issues mincxity 
q;iini(His on every issue." 

In spite of such misconceptions, Henley says she 
draws a great deal of satisfaction from serving on 
council. "It is really a matter of being involved and 
interested in the city," she said. "We seem to get 
picked on in the press, but I trust that anyone who 
chooses to serve the pubUc should expect some 
criticism." 

"This job definitely demands a great deal of time. I 
ah-eady devote a lot of hours to the city because I attend 
so many functions. The amount of hours I put into Qty 
Council are definitely comparable to a full-time job." 

Jones, echdng Henley's notions of dedication, said 
he expects to spend a good deal of time on the job. "I 
plan on doing whatever it takes to do the job of being 
mayor of Virginia Beach. ' ' 




Board to Discuss Corporal Punishment 



I ' *I don't Mieve e^>oral punishn^it 
jto eff^ve in the m^ool %y%Um, As a 
's^chdc^iit I'm ttiorou^y against 



(Continued from Pafc 1) 

ha>^ the serious kinds of problems other school 
systems have such as assaults of teachers, it is good for 
us to have a corporal punishment pdicy on the bodes, 
^ehzhom said that the 62 recwded uses of corporal 
iMmishment iMt year was "extremely low considering 
t^ we have more than 53,000 students." Stenzhom, 
caBini the po^ "worthwhile," said he belkves most 
piBitirts in Virginia Beach want c^xporal punislsnent in 
the schools. "In fact, the only people who don^t want h 
are thd high sdhod students because they feelttey are 
too old fcr it." Stenzhom said there were no instances 
of corporal punishment being administered to second- 
ary schod students \esX ytax. 

There are others besides high sdiool- sttdferts who 
would lUa to see corporal punishment done away with. 
One dHUktm, Dr. DuiK»n S. Wallace, is » meiftber of 
the schttil board. "I don't believe corporal punishment 
is elll^i^ in the school system," he said. "As a 
{M^jNMsjikt, I am thoroughly i^ainst it." 

Utf^per penned by WaUace last Mardh, ''Corporal 
Pindsltaent In The Schoob," he poiiited out that 
Utting *ildren fiuls to bring about long-term change. 
'*O3rp0M pu^luMnt when used su(^ssfiitty is a way 
<rf modifymg owert behavior and not erf chanfing basic 
personaUty," Wallace wrote. "A hostile <diMU remains 
teitte and an impulsive child remains impulsive, a 
deluskmal child will most assuredly not lose his 
(telttskxu. We may smooth off the ninth of Ihe iceberg 
abow the surface. But the portion below the surface 
f^mto M trea^rously Msscd as before.M '•> 

Qvporal pu^taaem "does not stop the undesiiea- 
. bfe behavior for even a temporary period," WaUace 
stated, "ft (Aen just drives it underground-/' 

Wallace, in his [Mper, cited the fiun that corporal 
pimlslBiMnt hM been abancknned in a number ol 
: Ibe^tos and situations. The am^d forces and prisons 
dOTCt use QfXpatA pmishmem, »»^ding to WaUKX, 
, nv is it used as a dudpUnary measure in the treatment 
of uhn^. School systems in Boston, Baltimore, 
Otoigo, New York, Philadelphia, St. I^ul, !kn 
VtugMOOt awl WathiofUBt D. C. have done away with 
ootpond iNinishiMitt, Wal^x said, as have school 
systtms ia Maine. Hawaii, Sweden, Denmark. Norw^, 
Rnhml, lee^A M fM^teM, bnrt, Ji^u. Nnid 



and France. 

Wallaoi said there is a "near-perfect" correlation 
between the amount and severity of physical punish- 
ment one receives from ages two to 12, and the 
subsequent numbers of anti-social acts committed by 
that person in later years. It is for this reason Wall»» 
calls caporal punishment "dangerous." 

Wallace concluded, "the best and most pervasive 
reason against corpwal punishment is that it does not 
fit the dignity and profcssiaial integrity of those 
charged with the educational care <rf the child." 
^ Reva Kelberg, a schod board member since 1966, 
said there is a place for a corporal punishment pdicy in 
the Virginia Beach schod system. Kelberg, recupera- 
ting from back surgery, smd she opposed any change m 
current pdicy. 

Tony Mancini, who served as chairman of the 
committee which devised the corporal punishment 
guidelines, said he was "unaware of any objections to 

the policy." 

Mancini, prindpal at Windsor Woods Elementary 
School,caUed the policy "good" and "necessary." 

"When you're dealing whh 800 or 1 ,000 studems and 
there is a recurrence <rf disruption <rf the educational 



Boogie Board Tournament Set For 5th Street 



process, satisfactory improvements must somehow be 
made," he said. "I d«i't think corpo-al punishment is 
used in any way except to correct a child's actions and 
to get him on the right path." 

Behavior modification is the goal of corporal 
punishment, Mandni said. "Ideally, it would be best 
to never have to even scdd a child, but that is not the 
way life is," he said. "The primary purpose is to 
ensure the child learns from ft, and accepts the 
consequences for his actions." 

Mandni questioned why discussion of corporal 
punishment is being introduced to the schod board's 
agenda just two years after revision of the dd pdicy. 
"I don't know what the rationale is except there must 
be some pec^le whoTwl very strongly about it one way 
or another," he said. "I rather doiAt there will be any 
fundamental philosphical changes in the pdicy. If we 
conducted andher survey, I'm sure the results would 
be about the same, which is to say overwhehningly in 
support of corporal punishmwit." 

Mancini went to say "there is no reason why any 
poacy should not be reviewed periodicaUy. It is the 
right and responsibility of members of the schod board 
to question and investigate any pdicy they see fit." 



The first co-sponsored 
Sunkist/Morey Boogie 
Contest in >^|inia wiU be 
i»ld in Mrginia Beach on 
Saturday ttKl ^UKliqf, 
August 7 and 8, on tlw 
beach tt Sth Str^t. 

Cki &uurtey, August 7, 
tlK day begiai at 10 a.m. 
with a demottstratiGn d 
Moiey Boogte ridii^ by 
ai» erf California's higl^st 
rmked prt^ssional rid- 
ers, Roger Walter and 



North Ckrdina's only 
AAA rider. Stuaitl Hay- 
ward. Rc^er uid Stuart 
will be avaikibte all day to 
IM-ovide instruction. 

Satutttaiy's ft«e contest 
begins at 9 a.m. with 
check-in at 8:30 a.m. 
Bntry forms are availat^ 
atiril Morey Boogie Board 
(teaters and be^i sun- 
ups will y» Mx:peted. 
There wiU be four age 
group divisioia and boys 



and girls <rf idl ages are 
eacoun^ed to join the 
fun. A custom Sunkist 
Morey BoogK Board and 
trophy wiM be given to 
eadi <d the. first place 
finkters and tropes and 
achlitional prizes wiU be 
awarded to the second 
ukI third i^aM finaters. 

On both Satuitiay and 
Suday, free samfrtes d 
Sunkist Oange Soda will 



be avaitobte for those who 
iHiiM 19 a Uiirst. The 
liud^ wmners d a free 
(hawing will receive Sunk- 
ist gdf caps, Morey Boog- 
k Boanls, or ChurchOI 
swmi fim. Free Sunlnt 
T^hirts and Morey Boog- 
ie Boud posters will be 
given vo aU registered 
putki(»nts. Boutto and 
swimfins will be avidlabte j 
on the bewi for every^ 
one's use. 



attttaM 



■■■ 



mmt 



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IMBH 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1^2 



Beach Entertainnieiit 



-I * 




Swinging at the Cavalier 



Music for Nostalgia Niglit was provided by tlie 
'King's of Swing." 



ByGregGoldfarb 
SunEdittM- 

Between the years of 1958 and 1975 the 
Cavalier Hotel held no oceanfront open air 
dances. Before and after those years moonlit 
serenades were commomplace. 

Brown bags and big bands performed at the 
Cavalier Beach Club in 1927 when the hotel 
was first built. The dancing was interrupted 
by trouble overseas, but continue until the 
late '50's. The dancefloor stayed dark until 
1975 when Mary Sands, now deceased, and 
Kay Crutchfield worked to bring back the sen- 
sations, and passion of leisurely seaside living 
and dancing at the Cavalier. They began the 
Cavalier Beach Club Nostalgia nights. 

After seven years, and seven dances, last 
weekend's starlit strolling at the Cavalier en- 
ded. The beach club is being demolished to 
build a Cavalier convention center. 

Boyd Colgate, executive vice president and 
director of the Cavalier Hotel Corporation, 



said such musical greats as The Dorsey 
Brothers, Harry James, Guy Lombardo and 
Glenn Miller performed previously at the 
Cavalier. 

"The people came here for a good tinie and 
dancing under the stars," he said. 

The dances are attends! usually by over 400 
people and lure sellouts. 

After Sands and Crutchfield got the dances 
underway, it became a chore. The Cavalier 
Corporation decided to underwrite them. 

Last weekend over 500 people attended the 
last nostalgia night. The price was $38.50i foi" 
dancing, setups, and a traditional Cavalier 
breakfast served on china dinnerware. The 
menu featured many of the same items the 
Cavalier offered years ago. 

Music was provided by Richmond's "Kings 
of Swing." 




i 



Mr. and Mn. Boyd Colgate, 
preddent of the Cavalier Corp. 



He Is vke 




Virginia Beach Cooncilwoman Meyera Oberndorf, 
front, was amongst the 60 people attending Forward's 



Beach Music Weekend 



recent meeting. 



Virginia Beach Forward Trying 
to Raise $100,000 for Museum 



' In an effort to raise 
mcve than $100,000 for 
the prc^KJsed Virginia 
Museum of Marine Scien- 
ces, a group of pditicaliy- 
motivated Virginia Beach 
businessmen announced 
last week it will sponsor a 
three-day "Beach Music 
Weekend." 

Bruce Thompson, pres- 
ident of Virginia l^ach 
Forward, said the event 
will take place the week- 
end of September 24-26. 
Hewing to attract between 
^,000 and 10,000 people at 
the various activities, 
Thompscm said the featu- 
red attracticns would in- 
clude a pig roast, a 
$25,000 shag dance cont- 
est, and concert perform- 
ances by the Drifters, the 
Castaways, the Fat Am- 
mons Band, Bill Deal and 
the Rhoidels, and many 
others. 

Ed RufGn, owner cH a 
Virginia Beach nightclub 
and a member oi Virginia 
Beach Forward, saul rest- 
aurants, hoteb and night- 
clubs throughout the city 
had agreed to open up 
ti^ir pUuxs <A tasiness 
that weekend to showcase 
the varkxis activities. The 
group plans to charge 
each person who attencb 
the musical weel^iui a 
standard fee d $20. 
Thompson said be hq>ed 
each ticket sold would, in 
turn, go towani tte mtu- 
eum. 

The museum, skMd to 
oxt more tl^ $6 miUan, 
is stiU in tte wMt-oae^' 
tion st^e of dewkipoMnt 
at its Owl's Qeek site 



south of Croatan. Tlie 
project is in serious finan- 
cial straits because of 
General Assembly acti<x) 
earlier this year which 
produced cmly $150,000 
for the museum. Rejected 
by the states legislators 
was a request fen* $1.5 
million. The city had 
prcxnised to dcmate $3.5 
millicn to the museum, 
and private donators had 
pledged about $1 million. 
Both figures were promi- 



sed with the state's $1.5 
million used as a match- 
ing target figure. 

Virginia Beach Forward 
wants to assist in the 
museum's ctxnpletion be- 
cause it will boost the 
city's cuhural and econo- 
mic bases, Thompson sa- 
id. "The museum will 
affect \%ginia Beach's 
tourism more than any 
other single project," he 
said. "It will have a 
tremendous impi^ on the 



ecoiomy. If we can raise 
that $100,000 we can be 
the catalyst of making this 
dream into reality." 

"We're not' trying to 
attract a bunch of cdlege 
kids l<x the day," Rufiin 
added. "We're serious 
about raising money for 
the completion ctf the mu- 
seum." Faith Beach, 
another member of the 
group, calted the event "a 
weelttnd for the teenybo- 
ppers of yesteryear." 



Tou deserve a floe meal expertly 
served in the relaxed atmosphere of Old Virginia. 

That's just what you get at the Aberdeen Barns. 



> PRIME BEEF 
> SEAFOOD 
•COCKTAILS 
• FINE WINES 
•BANQUET FACILITIES 




»f' 
^ I 



OPEN 

EVENINGS 4-12 
SUNDAYS 12-10 

S^5 Northhampton Uvd. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

tNOUR COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
William BtirneU 

Mqjor Credit Cards Aaxptmi 




mum 



A Dance for 
Special People 



A dance fen- physically 
and mentally handicapped 
poeple will be held &itur- 
day, August 21, 1982, 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
Locatic» will be at the 
Bow Greek Recreation 
Center, 3427 Qubhouse 
Road, \%ginia Bieach. 
The dance will be sponso- 
red by the Conununication 
Workers of America - 
AFI^aO - Local 2202, 

AU Special F^10 ai«r*'*: 
t&e Virginia Beach Depar- 
tment of Parks and Recre- 
atic«. 

Participation is free. 
Refreshments will be ser- 
ved and door prizes will 
be given. Pvents and 
guardians are welcome, 
however, cfaaperones are 
present at all times. 

Transpotation is avail- 
able -from your area; how- 
ever, fa- planning purpo- 
ses we must know by 
August 12 if you desire 
transportation. Please 
call Joy Stinnett at 499- 
7619 week-days from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 



For further infwmation 
call either idm Ditty oi 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
on 486-3110. 




ON THE AIR 
AND IN THE SUN 

WITH DANNY McCLAIN 



cafood 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY 
WITH RAY BROWN 
ON niE PIANO 

COCKTAILS 
OihiMr Scrvwi *ti 2«0 Mfc 



; Y>ku're Coins To Love Our 
2" THICK 

NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 



FOB 
ONLY 



lf*j 



.Tiy«M*|Wi1 



:Sr,««. ""^^ir^! LIVE MAINE L(»STER 

««o^tt** / ^-^ — UA 1 'A lb Lotwli itiiiltd with 

20 mm. trip to Portsmouth! iwAo Ctth MMt 

3010 HIGH ST.-PORTSMOUTH ^" «!/• •■ mk^ 

397-8196 a?v'l3'* 



Ptona catt fw directions. 
Opca ■ mm^ ■.m. tdaacd Mon^lays) 



VomIi 



iill»] 



VALUE'S 
SHORE DINNER 



f, w^^^ 



If you diought you coiddn't afford a^reat seafood dumer, 
vouhaveirt been to ^^e^slatd.y.S^ti^t a difference i_ 
bu3f!ng lobster and dams by the boadoad can do fof the price/ 



'Owin Maine 
Lobsters 

Shore Dhmer 

Maine Lobster 

Golden Fried 
y^adk dams 



$795 
$595 




— OMimwith 
fiurmmpeetOim- 



&dced Steffi c» 

aaendl^i^dff _ _ _ _ _ 

b,yiPt OTO O^ Slaw and 
o^Ri b^d RcHig 7CW a 
!. (For ewe p«scm cHuy.) 



caa 



OMtrice of Boiled or Baked Sbified 
LdsMer M^ Gokkai 9^ dams. 
Commvitfi all die «me fixim 
above 



aa 



0^<rfour G«tt ^Aihm. Baked 
StvfftA M BoOed. Om^te «ridi d- 
3»^au«rt Oxn-oo-ti»0^, bcMi^ 
oMde Co w Mw ^k1 ovei bak^ Rofla. 



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fixlna 



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VH^OA K«CMf «M ^iM« BeKA Mi^., Jet If^cmendence Hvd., I^wte §8 
ktlHI,tfMai.0p«nevei7 diylrtMi 11 ijiL 




/ 



^glnia Be«* Sun, Aufust 4, 1982 5 



^ 



\0- 



To the Area 



Toto, Steppenwolf Coming 



Wginia Beach's Whis- 
per Concerts, Inc. is ccm- 
tinuing its summer coi- 
cert series this week mth 
a perfonnance by Toto. 

Toto is a six-member 
rock and rdl band which 
started as high school 
classmates in Los Angel- 
es' San Fernando Valley a 
decade ago. Toto first hit 
the charts in 1979 with the 
single "Hold the Une," 
which sdd over 1 million 



copies. Since then, the 
group has scored big tuts 
with 'Tli Supply the Lo- 
ve," "99," "Gcorgie Por- 
gy." "Ckxxlbye Elanor," 
and their biggest singte to 
date, "RoMuma", The 
band is led by the Foccaro 
brothers, Jeff who plays 
drums and writes the 
songs, and Steve, who 
plays keyboards and sings 
leiid. MikelHsrearoMcen- 
tly joined Uie group on 



CRUISE 

TO BERMUDA 

FROM NORFOIK 

AND SAVE 



bass, rejdadng founding 
member David Hungate. 
David Paich, Steve Lukat- 
her and Bobby Kinnibell 
fill out the band. 

Appearing with Toto 
will be the ftoducera. a 
new vfV/9 rock quartet 
with a large foUowhig in 
Atlanta. The concert will 
take place this Friday at 
Chrysler Hall. 

Other upcoming coo- 
certs from Whisper are: 

• The Police, Monday, 
August 9 at bkjrfolk Scope 
at 8 p.m. 

• Ihe Main Event feat- 
urii^ Kansas, Blue Oys- 
ter Cult and Aldo Nova. 



Thursday August 12 at 
Norfolk S«)pe.'Ooors for 
the 7 p.m. general admis- 
sion showopen at S p.m. 

• Steppenwdf, Tues- 
day. August 17«t Rogue's 
at 8 p.m. 

Tickets for all shows are 
available at all Mother's 
Record Stores, Bftr's Mia- 
Ttaxy at 17th Street and 
Atlantic Avenue, Birdland 
Records at Providence 
Square, Naval Operations 
Base ^ciid Services, 
land Tracks Records and 
Tq>es. Further informa- 
tion can be obtained by 
calling Whisper at 428- 
4451. 




i 

f 
I 

I 



The rock group Toto b comlBg to the area. 



New Album Sales Up to Snuff 



$ 



Now you can 
cruise to Ber- 
muda on the 
"Fun Ship" tss 
MardOrasand 
save $200 off the 
cost of your cj^a 

\4rtua^ eveiy- 
tWngs Included 
for one low price! 
AN nnealsarid 
snacks (eight of 




I 



them each da^)u 
dazzling cabAiet 
shows... dance 
bands... a hiH 
gamblr>gcasina~ 
jffKl dozens of 
sNpboardac- 
tMties. You can 
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Don't miss out on this "Fun Ship" crube 

leaving from Norfolk to Bermuda — 

make your reservations naml 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun staff Writer 
If local sales during the first week of release of an 
album are any indicatioo of a band's fiiture success, it| 
may be that Virginia Beach's country's rock group, ^ 
Snuff, is well on its way. -. . . ^ 

Track's Records and Tpes in Norfolk reported brisk 
sales of the bands debut l.p. during its initial week of 
sales two weeks ago. The album finished the week as 
the top-seUer, outpacing new releases by Fleetwood 
Mac, Led Zeppdin's Robert Plant, RED Speedwagon,^ 
Asia, and Paul McCartney's "TUg of War," the 
number one-selling album in America. 

"You've got to remember the sale? arc so good m 
this area because Snuff is from Virginia Beach," said 
TVacks' purbjiasing agent Dama Agresto. "But to 
finish the week at number one ahead of Fleetwood Mac 
and McCartney is doing pretty good." 

Agresto explained that much of the band's uutial 
success may stem from the fact that record is receadng 
considerable airplay on country stations, particularly 




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SaafTs New Album 

WdWS, the area's top-rated station according to the 
latest Arbitron figures. ""By crossing over to the 
country market, Snuff is touching in on a whde new 
breed of listeners," Agresto said, adding the album is 
selling well in other markets, too. ^ c «r 

Mother's Records at Lynnhaven Mall says the bnuti 
album is making waves there, also. "After the first 
week, the l.p. is in our top ten," said Sue Noel, the 
stwe's buyer. "We're selling around 10 to 15 of them 
every day, so we have had to order some more from the 

company." ,, 

If the album is to becane a success naticwiaiiy, 
marketing and promoting will be necessary from 
Snuffs record company, Elektra, An offspnng of 
Warner Communications, *hic., Elektra joins Warner 
Brothers Recwds and Atlantic Records to make up the 
wcM-ld's largest record company, grossing mwe than $1 
billiai last year. 

Merchandising of the Snuff l.p. will cost Warner 
$100,000. Recording and production costs talUed more 
than $200,000. The act was signed by Jimmy Bowen of 
Nashville, who has also produced records for Frank 
Sinatra, Eddie Rabbit, Hank Williams. Jr., and Mel 
TlUis Producing the Snuff album was Phil Gernhard, 
who has masterminded such hits as "Stay" by Maunce 
Williams," "Ut Your Love Flow" by the Bellamy 
Brothers," and "Wildwood Weed" and "Spiders and 
Snakes" by Jim Stafford. 

The band, which was named by a girl m the audience 
during Snuffs first professional club appearance more 
than 10 years ago, writes much of its own material. 
One member of the band, guitarist-vocalist Chuck 
Larson, recenUy won the American Songwriters 
Caitest in the professional division for his original 
tune, "Everybody Wants to go to Heaven." hi tmal, 
Snuff members have penned more than 60 songs. 

White ihe former Linda Ronstat hit, "Willing is 



getting some air time for Snuff on the rock and rdl 
stations, country hit "So Tliis Is" was broken by 19 
country stations in the southeast last week. Although 
other country stars such as the Oak Ridge Boys , J(*nny 
Cash, Barbara Mandrell, and Kenny Rogers, released 
new songs last week, the Snuff single was listed as a 
recanmended top pick by Billboard, the leading trade 
publication. 

The band is p lanning a number of local appearances 
soOTi, including an i4)pearance at the first annual 
f'Rockin' in the Woods" concert in Surry, North 
Cardina in August with the Allman Brothers and 
Robbing Thompson. On August 8, Snuff will play at the 
Record Bar convention with Alabama, Jdin Cougar and 
Marshall Crenshaw. Snuff is also slated to headline at 
Norfdk's TWcentenial. 





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6 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1982 

Community News 



Newt BfM$ 

Fishing 

The womens' and girls' 
catches outweighed the 
mens' and bttys* in the 
19th Annual Virginia 
Beach-Norfdk Bluefish- 
Bluefin "Hina Tournam- 
ent. Prizes were awarded 
recently at the tournam- 
ent's annual award outing 
at Rudee Inlet. 

The wcxnen's largest 
bluefish, which weighed 
in at 14 pounds, 12 ounc- 
es, was caught by Dawn 
CarlsMi of aifton Park, N. 
Y. The largest men's 
bluefish, caught by Mich- 
ael L Reed of Craigsville, 
W. Va.. weighed 14 po- 
unds, 3 ounces. 

The trc^hy for girls' 
largest bluefish went to 
Amy Wilson of Virginia 
Beach few her 15 pound 
catch. Kent Carter of 
Manakin-Sabot, Va., took 
the trophy for boys' lar- 
bluefish with his 13 
pound, 4-ounce catch. 



Reunion 

The Maury/Granby Al- 
umnus of the 40's will 
hold a reunicm and dance 
at the Cavalier Beach and 
Cabana Qub in Virginia 
Beach on Saturday, Au- 
gust 21, with a 17 piece 
orchestra, the "Super 
Jazz Band." 

Letter of invitation may 
be obtained at Doumars 
Drive-in in NotMk or Mr. 
LeRoys at London Bridge. 

Call 340-9137 for infor- 
mati<Mi. 



>' 



'Cinnamon Skin' One of MacDonald's Best Literary Works 



Courtesy: FiresideNews & Book Store 

In his new^t novel, John D. MacDonald 
takes us ona a harrowing search for a man who 
has brought tragedy into the life of Travis 
McGee's long-time friend, Meyer, 

Meyer has lent the John Maynard Keynes to 
his niece. Norma, and her new husband, Evan 
Lawrence. But out in open water in the 
Florida Keys the boat is destroyed by an ex- 
posion. Apparently Norma and Evan are 




alone with one crew member when it happens. 
An anonymous phone call shortly after the ex- 
plosion claims that a Chilean underground 
organiziUion is responsible. Some say the ex- 
plosion is connected to drug traffic; others 
remember Meyer had been in Santiago three 
years earlier. But small seeds of doubt about 
the number and names of persons actually 
aboard the ill-fated boat plague McGee. Soon 
he's following a faint trail back to Evan 
Lawrence's past. We're drawn into a strange 
tangle of identities that takes Meyer and 
McGee from Florida to Mexico on an in- 
vestigation which will alter irrevocably both 
men's lives. 



Cinnamon Skin is another superbly crafted 
tale from a favorite novelist. 



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A Frank Sinatra fan 
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Call Eric Stevens at 
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information. 



$1,000 Offered for Information 



Virginia Beach Crime Solvers is looking fw two 
subjects who have felcMiy warrants on file fw Virginia 
Beach crimes. In attempting to locate these people, 
Crime Sdvers wUl pay up to $1,000 cash reward to 
anycRie who can provide infcH-mation that leads to their 
apprehension. 

The first wanted perscm is Charles W. VanhoTi, III, 
who is a 23 year old white male, 5'7" tall, weighing 160 
pounds, with green eyes and shoulder-length wavy 
blcMide hair. Warrants are on file fw Vanhcx-n for a 
June 30, 1982 burglary and grand larceny that occurred 
on Woodbume Drive in The Lakes section of Virginia 
Beach. He is known to frequent the Triangle Trailer, 
Park. 

The secMid wanted persoi is Wilbcrt Rudolph brown 
who is a 28 year old black male six feet tall, weighing 
167 poinds, with black hair and brown eyes. He has 
used the alias of William Nathaniel Brown and Michael 
Davis. Brown is wanted by the Virginia Beach Police 
Department for felonies related to credit card fraud, 
fOTgery at Sears in Pembroke Mall, and for failing to 
appear in Qrcuit Court. 

Anyone who has infOTmaticxi about these people or 
any other wanted person should call Crime Solvers at 
427-0000. Oime Solvers also will pay cash rewards fw 
information about any crime, the recovery of drugs or 
stden property. 



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Tidewater's Tc^J 13 
presented weekly as a courtesy of: Dnuy Mcdnln n 
WGH radio. ^^ 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 
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Hdd Me - Fleetwood Mac 

Take It Away - Paul McCartney ' 

Eye Of The Tiger - Survivor 

Rosanna -toto 

Hard To Say I'm Sorry - Chicago 

Even The Nights Are Better - Air Supply 

Love Will Turn You Around - Kenny Rogers 

Wasted On The Way ~ Crosby, Stills And Nash 

You Should Hear Hov/ She Talks About You ~ 

Melissa Manchester 
Blue Eyes -- Elton JcAn 
Personally - Karla BonotT 
Keep The Fire Bumin' - Reo Speedwagon 
DEBUT. . .Michael Murphy ~ Whats Foreverfor? 



Robert B. Laibstain, M.D. 

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Wginia Beadi Sun, August 4, 1W2 7 



Campbell Gets Virginia, Beach's Mail Through 



Postmaster concerned that more 

Vtrginia Beach residents don't use thg 

new main post office on Lynnhaven 

Parkway; he's also excited by the 

future. 

ByOregOoldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Hie new $1.8 million Virginia Beach Postal System 
main (rffice is located en Lynnhaven Parkwwy, mklway 
between lynnhaven MaU and ^^inia Beach Boale<- 
vard. 

\l\s aesthetically pleasing, sfMdous, and even offers 
24-liour customer sejvk^. So why aren't more Vkgiii» 
Beach residents aware (tf it? 

"Virginia Beach should be proud ct their new post 
(rffice." said Virginia Beach Postmaster Joe N. 
Campbell. "When we first came on line two months 
ago. 80 percent to 90 percent <tf the people fai Virginia 
Beach didn't know where we were loctfed. Who do you 
blame? llie press? Tlw post office? The city? I don't 
know of buflding cA this magnitude that Ins ever been 
built in Virginia BeacA with any less coverage." 

Hie new noin office houses 103 to 110 of the city's 
458 postal employees, and is responsible for covering 
58 ctf the city's 174 different mail routes. Ibe entraiKX 
to the 20,000 square foot building is on Viking Drive, 
which, because of city ordinance, requires the public 
address to be Viking Drive even though the fsdlity and 
its 700 foot frontage feces lynnhaven Parkway. 

Entering and exiting the new post office is easy. 
After you get in there are four service windows phis a 
complete self-service unit. 

"The public is very critical <rf the post office," said 
CampbeU, who arrived in Virginia Beach onty 10 weeks 
aga after serving four years as postmaster in Newport 
News and for 26 years in varying capacities in 
IHnlsmouth. 

•!^e biggest compkdnt is over the service customers 
rective when they come to the post offiwe to buy a 
stafap." he continued. "Generally people don't want 
to come to the post office, they have to. Then after they 
get here they are confronted with long lines. Tne 
customers get discruntled." 

Hiat's why the postal system has installed 24-hour 
self-service postal centers in four of the dty's 11 post 
offices, and at Pembroke MaU andtheCoiooy Building. 
Lolations of the post offices featuring the postal centers 
are the main office, Atlantic Station, Acredale, and 
London Bridge. Nine post offices offer 24 hour stamp 
machines, at regular prices. 

jhe self-serve postal centers allow customers to 

pefform any of the foUowing fimctions: Purchase 

st^ps, envelopes, and insurance; mafl att types of 

^^ parcels; make change; and calculate shippfaig costs 

with a rate charge. , \. i * i 

"This way, the customer can toke care « their postal 
needs when they have to and not during the structured 
hoirs of the post office," QmipbeU said. 

billion annually. ProteTwH range between $1 and $2 
miBion. Nationwide the number of postal employees is 
about 600,000. 

hi Virginia Beach, the postal system tm^osi about 
459 people and generates about $10 millioo annually. 

"In the last five years, the postal system is the only 
m^jor employer hi the U.S. that showed back to back 
productivity and efficiency ino^ases of 2 percent for 
each of the years," CampbeU boasts. 

bi feet, the postal system was mandated ui 1974 by 
the Congressional Postal Reorganization Act to be 
self-supportive. Postal (^Bcials agreed but insisted that 
the postal system then be fiwe to set its own rates, no 
longer provide firee services for government agencies, 
birt be aUowed to provide ftee services it wished 
like free mailing for the bUnd. 

Virginia Beach postpersons deliver maU to 100,267 
stqps a day; Tlwy process maU by tte foot, aUowing 
\95 peices to a foot. That computes out to 20,247,000 
peices of mail haiKlled per week. 

Virginia Beach Postal System employees can be 
broken down mto two categories, then fiirther 
subdivided. 

Craft employees number 430, which compares with 
28 supervisors. WitWn tl« rwla of craft emidcvees we 
239 letter carriers, 149 clerks, 21 mamtenance people. 




Virgliila Befch Postmaster Joe N. CampbcB woadcrs . why moi* Beach rcsidento don't me the city's new mahi post offlce on Lynnhaven PaAway. 




24-hoar postal service Is provided tt the Acredale. London Bridge and at the main of- 
following post offices: Atlantic Station, flee. 



17 mail handlers, and four special delivery people. 

Supervisees can be placed in three functional groups: 
manager of customer services; manager of mail 
processing, and supervisor of suppwt services. All of 
these positions are under Ctoipbell. 

When analyzing one aspect of postal efficiency, given 
a carrier complement rf 238, it takes 1,489 hours of 
carrier wrtivity a week to deliver the mail. Plus untold 
hours of support he^p.- Much of the mail is processed by 
a letter sorting machine called a LSM. which consists of 



a console, manned by 12 operates. This letter-sorting 
work is now being performed at the mail handling 
umex on Parker Road, located off Virginia Beach 
Boulevard near London Bridge. But, when the new $18 
miUion Tidewater Mail Facility opens in Norfolk at the 
comer of Church Street and Brambleloo Avenue in 
March of next year, some 'V^ginia Beach Postal 
workers wUl have to work hi Norfdk. 

Qptic iea(ters are threatenmg the jobs of LSM 
operators. They are computers, capable of twice the 



work of conventional LSM's and occupying half the 
space. The number of optic readers the postal system 
receives for the Norfolk center will affect the number of 
Virginia Beach postal workers to be relocated in 
Norfolk. 

"No one wiU lose then: jobs," CampbeU said. "Any 
personnel changes wiU be handled through attritim, 
such as people change jobs, retu-e, quit due to health 
reasMis, ot die. If seniority is affected when we move 
to Norf(rik, it wiU be dealt with as provided for under 
unicm guidelines . 

CampbeU said there have been prototype optic 
readers avaUable, but it's an "unknown" factor as to 
when they wUlbe available economically nationwide., 
By the tune they are, ihost letter-senders wUl be using a 
nine-digit zip code, if Congress approves the proposal, 
which is expected by Oct., 1983. This wUl aUow maU to 
be deUvered from a sectional center directly to 
somecme's home without mtemiption. EventuaUy, it 
wiU also mean that labor once required by humans wUl 
be performed by madiines. 

"It's the most exciting thing we can look forward to 
In the post office," CampbeU said. 

Hie nine-digit zip code actuaUy presots the mail 
whUe the mail is being processed. Not during or after. 
The extra four digits refers to "groups of houses" not 
individual ones, CampbeU said. 

"like CBN (Christian Broadcasting Network)," 
Campbell used for example. "They have a large 
maUing. Their addresses are on computer. All they 
have to do is update thefr maUing Ust to mclude the new 
zip code, and their maU is already presorted. That way 
you can send a letter from here to CaUfomia without a 
break in the service. We are hanging our hat on it." 

CampbeU said the price of a regular stamp wiU not 
exceed 20 cents for the next two years. After that time, 
CampbeU hopes. Congress wUl have dlowed for the 
new zip code, and the post office wUl be free to raise its 
rates to fund new techndiogical advances in the postal 
system. 



K3 



•,i- 




TTic Harper's 
Return From Far- 
Ri^chini Cruise 




resUe^ Mr. ttA Mrs. Ocertc 

tt«M MttHah« iran a raeeal New 

oiriM AMvd tke Royal VIdng ^ar. 

BtanragtaB-lkg vessel saled r«^ 

YoitlBre* M AUfu, CknrlotlcMNm, 
INitaa nd Newport. 



Fifth Annual Awards For Handicapped 



The Qty <rf Virginia 
Beach Ma^ir's Committ- 
ee on the Ifendicapped is 
spcxisoring its fifth annual 
ayanl. The award is 
presented for outstaixiing 
aocompUshn^nt in unpro- 
vmg the Ufestyte d the 
hfndicappe^, , 

Noaunatioos^can be 
made by individuals, rec- 
ognized coporations lega- 
Uy doing liwiaess m the 
cky <£ Virginia .Beach, or 



an organization, i.e. club 
or society^with active pro- 
gram for the welfare oi 
the citizens of Virginia 
Beach. Nomination forms 
may be (Stained by conta- 
cting ^he Mayor's OfBce 
at 427-^81. 

A nominee can be eM- 
ble for only one award a 
year. Nominated accomp- 
lishments must have tak- 
en place during the itfevi- 
ous 18 months or must be 



in progress at the time <rf 
the ncHnination. There is 
no limit on the number of 
nominees that can be 
named by one nominator. 
Award nominations are 
to be screened by the 
MayOT, the Award Comm- 
ittee, the chairperson of 
the Mayor's Committee 
on the Handicapped, the 
Secretary to the Mayor's 
CommitOec on the Handi- 
capped and one person at 



large not a member of the 
Committee. The final 
selections are to be appr- 
oved by the entire Coinmi- 
ttee. 

Nomination foms must 
be returned to the May- 
or's Office no hiter than 
August 15. Presentation 
of the award or awards, no 
more than two individuab 
may be selected in any 
one year, wiU be m«le in ; 
Octc^r. 



East Coast Surfing Championships Announced 



IF 



The 20^ Annual East Oiast Surfing Championshii» 
ii# be heU in^e surf at Qmip Pendleton in Vu-gmia 
Bewdi on August 2S aiKi 29. 

Traditionafiy one d the biggest specutor sports <A 
^Ot ^ar, the ftCSC itttiw:ts many (rf ^ top surfers 
fi^m the soutiMastem part d the United States as 
competkors. ;][^«|irfing begins at 7 a.m. on Saturday, 
the 28 ami listt until Sunday afternoon of the 29. 
T^jfriiies wUl be awarded to the top five finaUsts in each 
di^ion. 1, 

The surfing ouegorfes this year are: Mini-Huni, 
(umler 12 years); B<^, (12-14); Jr. Men's (15-17); 
ivfcn's, (18-24); hteMr*s. (25-30); Sr. Men's, (31 and 
owr); Women's. a*> Age limit); Loogboard, (No Age 
Lonit); Jay<»es, (For Jayoees only); &iperheat, 
(Wmners d Divnioos); awl ftolessionals. 



Anyone uiterested in entermg the surfing competit- 
ion must have their api^cations filed by August 22. 
Entry forms are avaUablc tx aU surf shops m tiM 
Tidewater area. 

The East Coast Surfing Cham{»onship is sponsored 
by the Virgiiria fo^fa Jaycees, K-94, ^ AUegheny 
Pepsi-Cola BottUng Co^any, aiui MdXnald's. 

There wiU be free wUnission and parking for the 
pubUc at Camp Pewlteton. Qtn buses wiU provkk 
transportation from tlw pvkfaig lot to Um bcKh area, 
hi addition to the surfing (xmpetition, other levities 
uidwie windsurfi^, saiUng, aenMc dandi^, body 
butkUng (xmpeiAn, gymnastics, ami karate exhiMt- 
ioo. 

Fa- ftuther inform^oo, oasttact Tom Kem^dy of t^ 
Jaycees at (804) 340-1591 . 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1982 



r Services 



Ih 



Jf^ 



Lean po 
the Family 

By Greg Goldfarb 
Sun Editor 

Naoni Warder is one of several Virginia 
Beach residents recently appointed by Gover- 
nor Qiarles Robb to the State Board of Social 
Services. 

But while Warder, a 27 year Beach resident 
and head of the Norfolk Department of Social 
Services, is thrilled over the appdntment, she 
is now much more aware of its importance. 

"It's a tremendous honor to be able to serve 
in siich an important position, and have an 
impact (Ml Social Services at the street level," 
she said. "But I never realized the 
responsibility I would have until now." 

The board is basically a poUcy making 
board, which will deal with such taxpayer 
supported programs such as fuel assistance, 
family- focus, child welfare, adoptions, and 
state and local hospitalization. 

Warder's term is for one year. She filled 
the seat of Hugo Curly, whose term expired on 
June 30. He served eight years. The board 
meets six months out of each year in 
Richmond and the other six at social services 
departments at various localities statewide. 

Warder says it's imparative to keep the 
from some traditional views of social services 
to more family-oriented philosophies. 

"When we see we have a patient with an 
illness, it's just not the patient that is ill, but 
the patient's surrounding family also," she 
said. "We are looking for more of a family 
approach to cure. There will be less of an 
emphasis on institutions." 

Warder says it's imparatiave to keep the 
family unit intact whenever possible. 

"We don't want the child to be used as a 
wedge to separate parents,'' Warder comme- 
nted. 

Warder said the state is planning to reduce 
the revenues social services offices across the 
state receive. Specifically, she said there will 
be less spent chi programs for abused 
children, foster children, and nursing homes. 

"I don't approve of a lot of this," she said, 
"especially the cuts for the elderly.*' 



Y ly lie Adams 

\ ClH.X'iH, BEAUTY 



BEAUTY SALONS 



•I"" Off Any Service 



AT ANY SHOP 





NsQinl Warder 



Fort Story 
Swimming 

The Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Paries and 
Itecreati(m announces th- 
at the public swimming 
area at pOTt Story beach 
will be closed to the public 
on August 20 - 22, due to 
training requirements of 
the U. S. Army. 

For any additional inf- 
ormation call the Parks 
Division, 467-2027. 

Stargazers 
to Meet 

The Virginia Astrologi- 
cal Association will con- 
duct their monthly meet- 
ifig at 8 p.m. on Mcmday, 
August 9, at the Pancake 
House in Princess Anne 
Plaza, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 

There will be a panel 
discussicn entitled "Ev- 
erything You've Always 
Wanted To Know About 
Astrology But Didn't 
Know Who To Ask." 

The public is welccnne. 
For information call 486- 
3731. 




Eliminate the worry 
of 'What's in our water . . . besides water?" 

Itanovw OiMrictfi ft Oiguda (Chlorine. Pesticides. Detergents. 

Bad Itete. ete.) Hmkiim UnOMOlMd PUtidM (Ri^ sediment 

dtacokxatioa etc) bMMti BKtwtai (kewdi 

\bur most positive step toward dean (Mnking water ttvixjghout 

your home, PLUS these added benefits: 

W«er-felated appliances last longer-clean tissh tasting ice cgbes- 

fluffler clothes firwn your wadw---dlminatestsrtJiti*«ndlavato(y 

njst ring-plants gftjw better-aquariums ace healthMr-lessarffee 

and juice concentrates required and they taste better— reduce spots 

on^KS and glasses. 

■asytohi^ain bwtaNIt 
b— I— th yoMi'«hifc 

CaU today for a free home 
demoratrationl 

Beach Water Systems, Inc. 

428-2237 




Extra Tennis 
Camp Planned 

The Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Parks and 
Recreation will conduct an 
additional tennis camp f(x 
youth at the Virginia Be- 
ach Recreatim Center- 
Kemps ville. 

The tennis camp will be 
held Monday, August 9 
through Friday, August 
13. Each child is to bring 
a can of new tennis balls, 
a tennis racquet, and a 
daily snack. Ages 12-15 
will meet from 9 a.m. - 12 
noon and ages 8-11 will 
meet frcxn 1-4 p.m. 

For regisitraticxi and 
additional information call 
467-4884. 



Edic Adams 

Ctl l#^(Jirb BEAUTY S 




BEAUTY SALONS 



COM€ TOGGWGR 
TO CUT & CURL! 

All days are, a family allair al Cut & 

Curl/Halrcrallers Wa have styling 

(Choices lor everyone & lor all ages 

PRECISION PROFESSIONAL 

HAIRCUTS PERMS 

$5.45 $12.95 up 



silt V«.Bnck Blvd. 



S3*HiUliv 
41(-M97 



tSTTAakaniDr. 



4MI-ESbeKDr. 
4(«-3133 



1734E.UIII*CMkU. 
5tM««3 



Open 9-6 Dally 9-9 Thors. 
No oppomtmenti n««d«d 






<^- 



Leisure 

Away, 

Ltd. 

We are the Factory 

that Specializes in 

Quality Hot Tubs ' 

and Waterbeds 

Custom Built to your 

Personalized Design, 



Pre -Opening Sale!! 

All Merchandise and Accessories at Special Below 

Factory Prices. 
Also $50.00 Sheets Free with Purchase of Waterbed. 

Leisure Away, Ltd. 
Phone: 484-9540 3586 Town Point Rd. 

Portsmouth, VA. 



-t;| 




'1 


i 




1 



I 




I 



')} 





Ripples do not move water— tfwy are wly the marks of a momen- 
tary disturbance. Neat, orderly, symetrical as they appear— they're 
I'ust the remains of a splash. 

How often we've tried to mate waves ... and ttt^ turned out to be 
merely ripples. Our efforts brou{|ht no new flow of thought or action 
We simply interrupted ttie tran0uiljfy. Or was it ttie stagnation? 

There are new Mrrents Erring todiy-<^ositive, refreshing, hope- 
ful currents There are reverent, lespoMiw people who believe it can 
tecomc a better vwrtd. 

Why don't you join the folks wfw aHfirtd of making ripples . . 
who when they see a n^ or a probhun plunge in to help? 

You'll find many su^ praple exptorirHJ the spiritual wells and 
springs. Their earm^n»s w4 eithusiasm is giving lenewed energy 
to our churdws. TNy wouM like to share with you their Christian 
opportunities and cluM«i(^. 



CopyrVM 1982 KinWr AdvanlMng Sarnn 
P 0. Bm torn. Ch mktmrM» . VirgMa ZZKfS 



TbeBar-B^ImfBani 

• Daily UuchMHi Spedaii 

• Daily Lundiera Specials 
• MM.Nite-Bar-B-QM 

•W«i.Nte-Uta 

Catertiig-Spectaliiing 
In "PigPick'ns" 

487-7407 , 

Rt. 17 at the Bridge in 
DeepCraek 



Au'n Judy 'f Boutfqiic 

• F^of Pond • Barclay Square 

• I^vey Bast • DeWeese 

• Jeraoe BiMbeven 

426-2800 

At Judy's Hair Designen 

Pungo Square Shiqiiiig Center 

Pungo 



Charilc'iScitfood 
Rcitsiinuit 

JlWShore Drive 
Vvgfai^BeaA 

May E. Rxhpetz 
and Employees 



IIm cm General Store 

CaUco FabricB. Haadkn^fts, 
HamOergfl&^^UaaidOyts 



MajB.to<p.a. Ck t mA TuM. 
MOdWi Bhri. «». UMaa M. 

SI.1 



TteHikPc^e 

Mm... WmneH...CMdrm 

Pemaamla. Coioriag, &yBng 

Daily l-S 

Tua. ad Thtn. Evenings 

^l-S350 

5300 Ptawideiiee Road 
nknOdSqaut 
^^qiaiaBeadi 



Ib^'i flair Dcg^Mn 

• Seta Cm« • Redkn ^oductt 

Puw> SqiMfft ft^^i^ CeMer 
Pui«e 



Sunday 



^S'V ••# 



S:«^ 



Monday 
RonMTtt 
12:9-18 



Tuesday 

ICorinttNans 

13:1-13 



Wednesday 

Eph^ans 

4:1 f^ 



Thursday 

f^il^aris 

4:5-13 



Friday 
6:9-12 



SahJit^ 
riaorowa 






^^ V m^ v'^m^ "^PW^^'^^^^m? ^/ ^' 



im-^it 






6 Co nyemkHi Locations 
To Serve You 






1419 



5494^90 

TlmOvaHM'wmid^^hytm 

ToMBaiMeCo. 



Backstage Boutlqae, Ltd. 

Dance-Gymnastics 

Fitness Apparel 

Theatrical Props and Supplies 

Mon.-Fri. 10to6 

Sat. 10 to 3 

497-4579 

323 KonpsviUe Plaza 

topping Onter 

Princess Anne Road 

Near Witchduck Ro«l 

Virginia Beach 



^nl's Place Haircutten . 

Men A Womoi 
6 Days |dus Wed. A Thurs. Nites 

424^1987 or 420-8840 

2 Blocks west of Indian River 

SHt^ping Center 

Next to Solar Car Wash 



Babyland 

• New and like new baby 
furniture & accessories 

• Child Line & Jenny Lynn Cribs 

• Children's Pre-Owied Qothes 

Oto6X 

We also Buy, Pick-up 

amlDcttva' 

420-3344 

Imlian River Shopping Center 
Chesapnke 



Pniuo Pown* iiqalpfient 

• Waiver Saks ft 9eri:e 

•UveBaitATKkle* 
■ Lawo Mower Rqwin 
• Betkling Plants ' 

I'm Pitapat AuMltoMi 
Pi^> ' ' 

AW-J^d 

4t«\^qMiBetoABM. 
Vi^akBeai^ . 

«^-4lW ' 

Fi^Aw B. Cmf: '■' 



Mn'tPlMercrafts 

•MMyi^Bs 

• Haiifaedttem 

• MMtUydMct 

Mon.-M. 10to9 

468^3416 

IIU <kwm Hun Square 
8M.M-4tai.l.4 



mnintftftare 

L.H.Buim^Siaff 



T¥% 



Yugum Bea<A &in, Aagvat 4, 1$^2 9 




Financial 
Guarantees 

Madeline Fortunato 



OccasioiiaUy, peopte tdl us that Uiey are rductant to 
invMt iB mon^ marked tvaaOa because "it isn't guvan- 
Hed" In vtew of usual roctton to die woid 'guanui> 
imd,* we can understand tUs hesitation. But, we won- 
der U tlwe pe(q>le really undostand the prin^pal that 
uadcriics any guwuttee. 

With a guanuitee must come restriction and 
taita^MM 4uU ]»rcrtect the pawn issuk« the guartai^ 
tie...ud fanpose certtia diswlvantages cm the person 
«ecq^tfn| die guarantee. ^i 

■jJpSfa— II "' ' ' "^'' I I lia— Bllim— x^ f i\ m il — lajaia^iaNai— 



For instant, consider money market certificates, 
such as Certificates of Dep<Mit (CDs). CDs guarantee 
3ni»nr{Hinciinlaiul a specific rate of intoeit. But, inor- 
da" to receive that guarantee, you must also accept some 
rMtrictions and limitations. 

Your money must be tied up for a spedfic period such 
as six monUis cw a year. The rate of int^est k ftcmm for 
that period or, to put it anotho- way: it's guaranteed 
not to grow during diat period, as weU as not to drop. 
If you want to withdraw your money before that period 
npires you must pay a substantial pcmalty on die in- 
ternt. 

Now, let's consider United Cash Managenent. None 
of tlM restrictgions and limitations mentioned above 
apply to United Cash Management. United Cash 
Management is not a 'guaranteed investment'... but it 
does guarantee your mcmey is nevw locked in... it's free 
to ke^ abreast of day to day economic conditions. 
Your money is tdwsys available for withdrawal ^tHh no 
interest poulty at all. Ymir mon^ earns the current 
high jdidds off^ed by money market instrumeats. 



from your friends at 

Waddell & 




INCORPORATED 



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WE ALL NEW DODGE 400 CONVERTmLE. 

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Pins Opttons and Destination Charge 




CALL-4^kepO 

3443 Virgmia Beach Blvd. ""TXTraScess Anne Plaza)' 



^-^ife- 



A Personalized Financial Plan 

tailored specifically for 

your family 

Are you really satisHed that your family's fmandal program is totally adequate for today 
and for the future? Have you realistically considered those bothersome, confusing 
details that can seriously affect your plans— inflation... taxes... Social Security? Does 
your present method of savings, investments and life insurance ownership allow 
you to make maximum use of our after-tax dollars? 

Now there's an easy way to create a realistic financial plan for you and your family 
through our personalized Financial Planning Service. 

Here's How It Works 

1 . We collect data from you concerning your assets, your 
needs, your objectives. 

2. This information is procedded through our computers- 
programmed by specialists in the fields of investments , 
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3. You receive a confidential 15 - to 25 - page report offering 
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FOR MORE INFORMATION 

CALL 

463-3081 



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■/ 



2953 Va. Beach Blvd.-Va. Beach 

340-7975 



4 LOCATIONS I 



Wards Comer 

(nada Shonrfm Omer - Ontiy St) 

Norfolk 

588-6666 



871 N. Military Hwy. 

(Aaw from KOtey Ckde - Nesa ID Fncha) 

I Norfolk 



Tower Mall-Portsmouth 

488-4467 



4(>6-7300 



•DrVORCE- 

New 6 Montii Law Includes 

Mandatory agreement $175 

•DIVORCE-Uncontested $175 

•LECUL SEPARATION 
AGREEMENT $11^ 

•CUfflPODY AND SUPPORT 

^Je^rad District Court) ... ....$125 



•BANKRUPTCY (Personal, 

individual or wage earner plan- 

Chapter 13). $2(M) 

•SIMPLE WILLS $35 

Over 65 Years of Age $25 

•REAL ESTATE ^ 

Assumptiona $150 

Buyers Fee (up to $45,000) 

Buyers Fee (over $45,000) 




•PERSONAL INJURY- 
ACCIDENTS 

(Settlement prior to suit 25 9b) 

•ADOPTIONS $150 

•CRIMINAL & TRAFFIC 

(General Etistrict Court) $125 

•CORPORATIONS $175 



4' 



ALL LEGAL SERVICES AVAILABLE INCLUDING: 
NAME CHANGE- JUVENILE-COURT MARTUL. AK>VE FEES DO NOT INCLUDE COURT CC^TS OR CX)mKTED CASES 



OTENDAILY 
EVENINGS & SATURDAYS 



The Legal CliNIC 

nir 

s 




TUART 



R.G 



ORDON 



■ 



■aaaai 



iM 



mmmm 



■■■ 






mmai 



^i^p^ 



m^mm^^^^i^ 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1982 

City Council 



Ocean Eddie's Spending Over $15,000 On Quiet 



(Continued from Page I) 

some of its appeal. Lach- 
man said that the rest- 
aurant had 21 rdl-out 
windows which allowed 
the clear, fresh air to 



come in. He said the 
place was "rustic" and 
that the management was 
reluctant to close the win- 
dows. But since some 
pec^le object, he said, the 



windows will be closed. 
The cost to the manage- 
ment will be $3,800 to 
$5,900 for the electrical 
work and $9,800 f(x the 
air ctMiditioning. He said 



Jones Wants Wheels Heard 



By Lee Cahill 

Sun Reporter 

Virginia Beach City Co- 
uncilman Robert G. 
"Bob" Jones wants the 
city's "squeaking whe- 
els" to be loud enough to 
win Virginia Beach a fair 
share of the state's road 
funds. 

Jones will represent the 
city at a public meeting of 
the Joint Legislative Audit 
and Revenue Commissi(Mi 
(JLARQ August 6 from 10 
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the 
Norfolk Qty Council Qu 
mbers. JLARC is study- 
ing the existing formula 
for distribution of state 
highway construction fu- 
nds. 

Jones was appdnted by 
Mayor Louis R. Jones to 
chair an ad hoc committee 
on roads, trafHc and park- 
ing with the make-up of 
the remaining members of 
the committee to be left to 
Robert JcMies. 

The mayor also appoin- 
ted JcHies, who is an 
attorney, to the Advisory 
Committee on Legislati(Mi. 

Robert Jones said the 
"whole name of the game 
is squeaking wheels." 

He noted that it is 
"very striking that 50 
percent of the entire ur- 
ban growth during the 
70's was in Virginia Beach 
but that "but by no means 
have we gotten compar- 
able funding." 

He said the problem 
was the allocatic«i formula 
used by the state. He said 
that 50 percent of the road 
money goes to primary 
and interstate matching 



funds of which the Beach 
receives naie; 25 percent 
is for secondary roads of 
which the Beach receives 
none, and only 25 percent 
is for urban roads. 

He said that Virginia 
Beach is the only city in 
the state whose main 
throughfare is a tdl road, 
while the city has spend 
over $20 million cm roads 
during the last seven 
years and approved by 
referendum $21 milli(m 
in b<»ids for roads in 1980. 

He expressed displea- 
sure at a statement from 
Richard G. Bridges, high- 
way ccxnmissicmer, that 
the city was getting its fair 
share of the highway 
funds. 

Councilwoman Reba 
McQanan ccMnmented 
that it was misleading to 
include revenues from the 
toll road as part of the 
State Highway Funds. 

The councilman noted 
that the Qty of Newpwt 
News is receiving 'during 
the next five years 
$607,694,000 in funds for 
the interstate system 
while the Beach, with 
only a half mile of inter- 
state, receives nothing. 
Among the 1 1 cities in the 
SufTolk EXstrict, Virginia 
Beach ranks fifth in con- 
struction funds which will 
be received per capita 
over the next six years 
while the city was second 
in population to Norfolk in 
the 1980 census and will 
probably be first in an 
update. 

Robert Jones, in report- 
ing on a July 22 meeting 



North Beach League Meets 



of the Legislative Commit- 
tee of the Virginia Munic- 
ipal League in Richmond, 
said that Norfolk Mayor 
Vincent Thcxnas is spear- 
heading a committee for 
intergoveiii.nental tax e- 
quity. Both Norfolk and 
Pcfftsmouth have contri- 
buted around $20,000 
each to fund the program. 
He said that two lobbyists 
are wcxrking in Washing- 
toa, D. C, and that the 
group is particularly ccni- 
cerned about government 
real estate which is not 
taxed. 

He said that new feder- 
alism also was discussed 
at the meeting especially 
in relation to the federal 
government's mandated 
programs for the state. 
He said that responsibiUty 
for funding the programs 
is passed on to the states 
and the state, in turn, 
passes it on to the munici- 
palities. He said that 
JIARC has identified 70 
areas where state man- 
dates require action by 
municipalities. Nobody 
knows how much this is 
costing the cities, he said. 

Rd>ert Jones said that 
he hoped Virginia Beach 
could make a significant 
impact on the JLARC 
study. He said that 
everyone is welcome to 
attend the August 6 meet- 
ing. The Mayor plans to 
attend. 

Councilman Jack Jenn- 
ings asked that the city 
get its legislation package 
ready early this year. He 
suggested two meetings 
with legislators, rather 
than <»e, in September 
and November. 



that this summer, the 
restaurant tias kept its 
windows shut and the 
ndse has dwindled down 
to a minilntam. 

Lachman siaid an archi- 
tect will Work on improv- 
ing the acdi^tics. 

Eddie Lachman began 
working on the iisstaurant 
ten years ago, and has 
been operating since 
1977. The pier was built 
by the late Eddie Lach- 
man in 1950. 

Elkan Lachman told 
council that Ocean Ed- 
die's, like other bars and 
rcstau. -'' in tU. '^esort 
area, hds been "elimin- 
ating the less desirable 
clientele. Everyone is 
giving the cdd shoulder to 
the undesirable types of 
pec^le," he said. 

He pointed out that 
over the past five years, 
the city attorney's office 
has received only four <x 
five ccxnplaints about 
Ocean Eddie's. He said 
that the musicians emplo- 
yed do nd use big ampUf- 
iers. "It's not Ukc TV 
where they are jumping 
up and down and kick- 
ing." He said that cm 
Monday and Tuesday the 
restaurant employs a com- 
edian. 

Richard G. Brydges, at- 
torney for Eddie Lachm- 
an, said that the restaur- 
ant contributes substanti- 
ally to the employment 
situation at the Beach and 
in taxes. He said the 
music there was not much 
different from music at 
other Beach establishm- 
ents. He said the restaur- 
ant will be enclosed and 
air-conditioned and now 
has an instrumental trio 
and no dancing. He 
objected to a proposed 
franchise which would 
have eliminated loudspe- ') 
akers, live entertainment 
or dancing on the pier lon 
or after December 31, 
1982 when the restaur- 
ant's lease with the pier 
owners expires. The pier 



is owned by three fiunii- 
ies, the lachmans, the 
Murdens adn the Bonn- 
eys. 

The whde issue of Oce- 
an Eddie's was brought to 
a head during the budget 
process when the acting 
Qty Manager Giles Dodd 
started to Ibok for money. 
He discovered that the 
pier owners had nd paid 
their fees which amounted 
to $15,000. When the 
lease came up for renewal 
last spring, Vakos asked 
fcH- the franchise. The big 
problem, he said, was the 
noise. 

AttOTney Grover Wri- 
ght, representiitg the Vir- 
ginia Beach Fishing Pier 
said that his first interest 
was for his client who 
wanted the franchise re- 
newal without the noise 
stipulaticm. The tenant's 
interest to him is seconda- 
ry, he said. 

Brydges said the resta- 
urant was 150 feet from 
the nearest mdel. He 
said that at one time the 
restaurant had a rock and 
roll band. 

Virginia Beach Coun- 
cilman William H. Kitchin 
maintained that the 
changed on the uses of the 
pier changed over the 
years without accom- 
panying permits. He also 
pointed that the restaurant 
management made no im- 
provements to the 
building until the fran- 
chise was in jeopardy. 

He said that there were 
places in the floor where 
"a pers(Hi with skinny 
legs" could slip through. 

Brydges maintained 
that the rapport with the 
police has been excellent. 
He said that the (^ration 
fits under the "amusem- 
[ent and concessions" fea- 
ture approved for the ^ier, 
■and that at some time the 
rounds can be annoying 
but to scHne they are 
amusements. 

Lachman admitted he 
"re-did" the structure as 



needed. ' If ti^o boards 
needed replacing, he'd 
replace them, he said. 

"I'm the bad guy in this 
thing," Kitchin said. 
"Over the years, the uses 
have changed, not by 
right but out of growth 
with no real contrd." 

He said that each year 
he has received letters 
about the ndse spedfical- 
ly fr«n three moteb en 
the south side of the pier. 
He said boards were nois- 
sing from the ceiling and 
that in two or three years 
the management has nd 
made any attempt to elim- 
inate the ndse. 

Lachman conceded, 
"We did have A loud band 
and we fired them. We 
actually had to turn the 
power off on one group. 
They wouldn't get off the 
stand." Lachnum's md- 
her Mildred Lachman is 
the majority stocldiolder 
in the pier. 

A request by Stanley 
Phillips, Vakos' attorney, 
to require the restaur^ 
to close, was ignored. 

Hie Pier has paid its 



$15,000 in back fees and year under the new fran- 
will b« charged $5,000 a chise. 




^^^ "f THE 

PINK PANTHER 

reminds you 

'Have Your Eyes Examined 
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The North Virginia 
Beach Civic League Meet- 
ing Will be held on Tues- 
day, August 10 at 7:30 
p.m. in the auditorium of 
the Association for Resea- 
rch and Enlightenment 
67th & Atlantic Avenue. 



Thomas H. Muehlenb- 
eck. City Manager of Vir- 
ginia Beach, will be the 
guest speaker. 

All residents and prc^ 
erty owners of North Virg- 
inia Beach are urged to 
attend. 



Correction 

On page 62 of last week's special editicm, "The 
Virginia Beach Story," there was an error in a headline. 
The Virginia Beach Department of Public Works 
performs such services as removing trash and dead 
animals, not the Department of Public Utilities, which 
provides services ranging from sewer system inspect- 
ions to engineering orderly development of altjernative 
sources of water. 



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Vufinia Beadi Sim, i^V^t 4. 1982 11 



> 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



rHMteMirtiV 



¥ 



3 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINO 

Hw ntnlar oMeting of the Gty CoiaK& ot Viiyiiiia 
Bei^ will be heanl in tbErOnindl Cbaaktmjbf^Giy 
Hiril Bottdlng, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Vbtfnia l^ai^ Viivala <» Mond^, Autuift 
16, 1^, at 2:00 P.M., ti wUdi tinw the following 9P- 
pUatkMis wiD be hevd: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSmCAtlON: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance iqxm Af^p^ea&m of R. O. Mo«e 
BuQdinf Corp., for a Change of Zcadng Oi^rict 
Classiflcation from R-S Residentid IXstiict to ^-9 
Raridential IM^ict on certain property located 100 bti 
Buxt OS tess Scnith of Re^«re IMve b^inning at a point 
4170 fee more or less West of Salem Road, runidng a 
cUtfanee of 1102 feet along the Noitiiem im^eity iH^ 
running a distance of 728.96 feet akwg the WWtfrte 
ivcqierty Um, nioniag a distance of 803.86 feet^^mig 
the EaMem propotjr line. Said parcel <»ntaim 19,737 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An OnUnaiue upon ^>piication of R. O. Modre 
Buikfing C^nrp., for a Change of Zomng DistrikA 
Classification from R-5 Residimtial District to |l-6 
Residential District <m certain property located a^ &e 
Southeasfera tenninoe <^ Pteasast Ys^ey Drive, run- 
ninng a distance of 1S17 feet alcmp tlw Northern prtqier- 
ty Une, running a distance of 642.26 fert hi a 
Southeasto-ly direeti<w, running a distance oi 661 feet 
m a Northwester^ directkm, running a distance of 612 
feet kk a Soudiwesterly directi(», running a distance of 
617.61 feet hi si Northwesterly direction^ running a 
distance of 171.70 feet in a Southwesterly direction, 
runnmg a disUuwe of 454.40 feet in a Northwe^erly 
dtae^icm ud runahig a dtonoe of 882.20 feet alongthe 
We^emiMopertyUne. SaU pared contahu 34.4 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. An CMinanoe iip(m Application of R. G. Moore 
Buildkig C<»p., fnr a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-S Residential District to R-8 
Residoitial District <m certain prtqierty located 430 feet 
more or less South of ^Ik^UiamantK Drive beguming at a 
pcrint 5272 feet more or less West of Salem Road, run- 
ning a dtttance of 661 feet n a Northwesto-ly dh;ection, 
nuudng a dtoaiue of 612 feet in a Southwe^erly ^rec- 
tirai, running a distance of 617.60 feet in a North- 
westerly directiffli, running a distance of 171.70 feet in a 
Southwestely dlrecti<»i, running a distance of 2201 feet 
hi a Southwea^erly dkection and running a distance of 
1301.84 feet hi a Northwesterly dkection. Said parcel 
contains 22.9 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

JSBBFS rllJJyWJxXnJKMn. 

« .^An QidiBance-upQirAp!pyfation*qf l^ifi^ 
Auttsiuftive. Inc., T/A Tteadqiuiit^, ft* "a* Xcm- 
ditifflial Use Permit for mstallatioii of tires on certahi 
property located on the Nwdi sUe of Princess Anne 
Road beghinmg at a pdnt 330 feet more or less Ea^ of 
WitdKhidc Road, running a distance of iS9.8 feet ahmg 
the N(ffth dde of Princess Anne Road, runmng a 
(finance of 188 feet aloi^ the Eastern property line, 
tuwk^ a (Ustance of 69.8 feet d<»g tlw Nortl^m 
prt^erty Une tad runnhig a distance of 188 feet ak»g 
the Western propoty fine. Said pared is located at 5128 
Princen Anne Road and contams 12,^2 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. i 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT' 

OASOFICATION: 
BAYSnSBOROUCW: 

5. An Ordfasance upon >^|^ciUion of R. G. Mome 
WirfMiiig Cotp., for a QmD$t of Zowng District 
OasdHcatira Utm B-2 Community-Busbiess Dtarict to 
Art Apartment District on Lots 1, 2, 3, 4v 5, aw^ por- 
tion of Lot 6. BkKk A, and a p^Om^lMh Wtek B, 
Northri(lie,Sectk« Three. Said pared Is known » 300, 
302,304, $», 310 a<fai 312 Hanier Street and contains 
22.956 stiMve feet. BAYSIDe BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

6. Motion of the Planning Oanmbdon of the uty of 
vjrjhtb Beadi. Virgil to mad the Ma^cr Steeet 
and M^iw^ i^n by hioeash^ die right^cf-way fm- a 
portion of Dam Neck Road east.of Oceana Boulevard to 
110 fed and by adding Culver Lane with a width and 
as diown on plats avaOaUe hi Oie Phuniiag Depwtmeitt 
and 1^ a&U^ a 66 foot r^-of^ray from Dun Neck 
Road to FerreD Parkway east of Oceana Boulevard. 
More detifled hif(»mati<m is avaihOrie hi the Dqwr- 

tmentofPluafav. \„a,t*t^" 

7. Moti(» of the Plannhig Conuninion of the 0I^(^ 

Virghite Beadi, Vk^si^ to amend certaui dements (tf ' 

die htatta Stred and ^iway Plan hi the Pen^rokd 

Ana. More detailed hiformatian is availd% in th^ 

|>qMBtaMnt of Pbuudngi 

fUU wttli m(H« (tetafled mformaticm are avaiUUehi^ 

DqMtttmatofnaniilitf. f 

All faiteKded p«s<Htt are hivited to attend. 

RuthHod^Sndth 

C^Oerk 

2T ^ 

8/4VB ^ 

455-13 



^fbe Vlitfnia Beach f^matag GommistioB wiB te^K 

Pliblk: Hearhig en Ttm^, Angust 10, 1982, at 12:00 

^Tta^CtoMicfl ChaB*«s or the Oty Hdl 

ftdltfng. Prtwess Aime Oonithoase, Yirginia Beach 

i^SS: AMeft«msiaa#IBT>rhckirt9:30A.M. hi 

iuT aCY A ffiOOMMHCATKJN TO TOE CTIY 

Ooiofl^ON. FINAL DBTERMWMION or TM 
S^^^ B TO m MADE BY CTTY OQWICIL 

S^bBR HAVING C^^^Q^y^T^ 

wmo4 THE an. ti* mmm ^>p*^obs wm 

gSl^^rS'DAYS BY PLANimO a»««. 
ll£tle» or At ("teM^ GoBWUssion ef the C^ of 

^i^MM pertt^M wcomme^ vtUralar parktag. 
^^^ MMMtfn to «nMrie tai ae Depvt- 



ment of Plannin||. ,.;, 

2. Motion (tf tlw Planning Commissiaa of ^tCtty of 
VIrguua Beach, Virginia, to amend and reorddn 
Section 7 <rf the Subdivision Ordmance pei^tmnrag to 
bonding requirements. More detailed u^fofpmation is 
available in the Department (rf^ Flannhig. < . v. 

3. An Ordinance upon Applicatkii<^C. ii» Km Kic. for 
a Cbnditiond Use Permit for an automt^vk; ^uad small 
engme repair establishment on certain prqpe^ located 
on the South side of South WitchdiKk Raa(|.}>ejgittnmg 
at the point 130 feet more or less West c^ t^iyjfiuknce 
Boulevir4 running a distanx of 95 feet, iB<ffeiQr less 
akmg theSouth side (tf Soutii Witchduck IMiad, qnvung 
a distance <tf 190.84 feet along the Wes^m jsroperty 
line, ninmng a distant^ of 77.09 feet^ idoog the 

'^outhei^ I«<9erty line, running a distance cif 35.33 feet 
in a Northerly direction, runnhig a distance of 6.70 feet 
m a Westerly (hrectkm, runnmg a distaiKX of 17 feet m 
a Northerly directkn. running a distance of 6.70 feet m 
an Easterly direction and runiux^ a distance of 156.41 
feet in, a Northerly direction. Said pared contains 
16,988.4 square feet. BAYSIDE BORGUGH- 
RE(;i^JLARAC£NDA: 
SUBDIVISK»4 VARIANCE: 

4. i^peal from Decisions of Adnunistrative Ofi&xrs in 
regttfd to certain elements (tf the Subdivision Qrdinan- 
ce. Subdivision for Home Buyers Properties, hic. 
F^perty located on the Nortii side of Southern 
Boulevard, ISO feet nrare or less East oi Oceana 
hooky fod. Rats with more detailed information are 
avaliaUe in the Department of Planning. LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OP ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
3. An Ordinance upon >^lication ai CL. I^her for a 
Change of Zoning Dbtrict dassificatkn from itr7 
Residential District to A-1 Apartment District on the 
Southeast corner of 27th ^eet and Bdtic Avenue, Lots 
26, 28, 30, 32. Block 97, Virgmia Beach Development 
Go. Parcel locded at 2611 Bahic Avenue uid contauis 
16.800 square feet. VIRGINAI BEACH BOROUGH 

6. An Ordinance upon Applicatioo of Thistees oi Sir 
Gdahad Cbmpany for a Change of Zoning District 
Oassificadon from R-6 Residentid District to I-l light 
Industrid District on the East skle (rfHoUan Road, 200 
feet more or less North <£ Landstown Road on Lots 1 
thru 20 and 23 thru 23. StarUng Farms. Sddjvoperty 
cootams 80.6 acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Apjdkation of Mrs. G. J. 
Qilbranson and Mrs. Nancy Vest for a Change of 
Zoning District Oassificatioo from R-3 Residentid 
District to R-8 Residentid District on property located 
360 feet Northeast of the intersection of Providence 
Road and Indian River Road, running a distance of 
733.18 feet along tiie Western {vopertylme, running a 
distune of 1001 .66 feet along the Eastern property line 
a n d iuuuhig a distance of 740 feet akn^ tiie Southern 
rrnrrrt] JMnr 'itii'* pared contauis, 9.91 acres. 
KEMPSmii BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ai^lkation of Mrs. G.^ J. 
Oulbranson and Mrs. Nancy Vest for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification from R-5 Residentid 
District to B-2 Conununty-Business District on certain 
property locUed on Ae North side of Providence Road 
begmnmg at apoid ^0 feet more or less East (tf Indian 
River Rod, runnmg a distance of 368 feet dong tiie 
North skle df Provulence Road, nmning a distamx of 
290 feet dong tiie Eastern property Ime, running a 
distance ctf 740 fed akng tiie Northern property Une. 
runnii^ a distance of 40 feet m a Southerly directkn, 
running a distance of 143 feet in an Easterly direction 
and runnmg a disttiKX oi 210 feet hi a Southerly 
direction. Saki parcel contauis 4.44 ao-es. 
KEMPSVSLE BORCUC». 

9. An Onlinanoe upon Applicatioo of Clifton N. and 
Barbara A. Hobnquist and Kenneth D. and Kathleen S. 
Barefoot for a Change of Zoning Distrkt Classification 
from R-6 Resifkittid Dbtrict to B-1 Kismess- 
Residentid District on property kxated on the Emt sde 
(rfKempsville Road beginnmg d a poutt 100 feet more 
or kss Soutii (tf bdian River Roul beghuung at a point 
1000 feet more or less Soutii of Indian River Road, 
rundng adistamx of 193.17 feet akng the Wtfstakfe of 
Kempsville Road,runnuig a (Hstancc ot 359.53 feet 
akng the Southern jntsperty line, running a dntonce of 
184.78 feet dong the Eastern property Une and runnmg 
a dis^nce <tf 31W.09 feet dong tiw Nortiiem {Hroperty 
Un». iSakl parcel contams 1.59 acres. KEMPSVILLE 

B<^ouaH. 

10. An Ot^Daace tqion Applkation oi ^^ginia 
{^tiobd 9ank, Trustee of Pd W. Atwood for a Change 
t^ioma^tatact dassiSeatkn from AlO-2 Agricuhurd 
'DjatrKtli^ Bt2 Oonmiun^Business Dte^k^ on the East 
side of ^bKttiridge Road b^humg at a pdi^ 372.6 feet 
North MAtwoodtoim Road, rwuung a^tadtt of 254.1 
feet aktag tiie East side of Sandbrk^e Rn^^n^g a 
distUKe (rf 66.2 feet in a NartbeasteflP.iti^Hon, 
numing a distance <rf 276.2 feet m a Sotfh^terly 
direi^ian and running a distance ^244.8 fe«t hi a 
Soutfiwestef^ cUrectkn. Parcel is lo^|ed^M. 1628 
Sandbr^ie Road and contams 38,3^.8 M^ius feet. 
PRINCESS AIWE BOROUGH. ^w- 

11. An,$lduiance upoa AppHcation <€ IlDiaad W. 
Stcrbed^ a duuge of Zomng District. 0ia i firarinn 
teww ftisiKss-Resi^ntid IXstrkt to Ba Oppmim- 
hy-toMM<^ I^Ma on property kxded o^l^' North 
^de ^mcess Ame Roid B^uhih^ d a poim 1150 
feet Wetf rf debe Ro^. runnhig a distaiMX of 114.20 
^t akng the North side of Princess Anne Road, 
runmng a distance of 160.56 fed doi« ^Western 
l^jperty Une, runmi^ a ^ttnce of llS.Jf^^t akng 
tlw Norttem property Ite awl rwmmg a Stance ct 
160.27 feet aki^ tiie Eastern prop^tyliae. SM pared 
coBitahs 17,859.6 square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 

12. An Ordinance upon AppUcdkn of John T. 
KUunoudb for a O^i^e aS ZonuiR District Cbssifk^- 
tkn from R-7 Resktentid OUtrkA to B44 Resort- 
C^nuMndd I^trict on Lott 1 thru 15, Woek 9, 
HnewoodPark. Property tekicued at 301 and 323 Ldee 
Drive nid coMte 36,154.8 sqnve feet. VnOMA 

13. M OrAnmee qpon ^ipte d kn of Oidani 
DevekspmeA OsrporHka for a C^m^ of Xmtm 
nstrict dMsifiedkm froa A-1 j ^afta^t MqM m 
Ap2 i^arMem Osttfat oriUiU 1 On 12. aoA 7, Lfltt 6 
ten 29, moA tjAi fl 0* 34, WeA 9. Lott 1 tten M. 
mck lOaiKi Ldtt 13 thra 17, Hbti: 11. nut ofMdiray. 
SiM pan^to ve k»m^ bet««cn Fhst teeet mad 



Second Street, West of ThaUa TYace Drive and contam 
8.64 anes. KEMPSVEIfi BOROU(»i 

14. An Ordinance upon ^n^ication of Oxford 
Develoimient Corporation for a Change ot Zoning 
Distrtet Oassi&ation firam B-2 Community-Business 
Distrkt to A-2 Apartnwnt Distrii^ on Lots 1 timi 32, 
Block 2, Lots 1 thru 32, Bhxk 3, Lots 1 thru 32, Nock 4, 
Lots 1 thru 10 and Lots 14 tiuii 19, Bkxk 6. P^t of 
Midway. Sak| parcels are tocated between Bonnieiy 
Road and First Street, West ot ThaUa Trace Mve and 
oontdn 12.02 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

15. An Orduumce upon An^hcatkn oi Jdm A. 
Vaughan, Jr., for a Change of Zonmg District 
dassificUion from R-8 Resklentid Distrkrt to O^l 
Office Distrkt on Lou 1, 2, 3, 4, and a portion of Parcel 
A.Bkx;k9.T1iaUaViUage. Property is located at 4356 
Booney Road and contains 2.261 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOR<UJCiH. 

coNDmoNAL USE permit; 

16. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of C Gordon CMiver 
for a Conditiond Use Permit for a self-senoce gasoUne 
station and car wash fedUty on property located on the 
SoiUh side of Haygood Road begmnmg at a point 150 
feet East of Aragona Boulevard, runmng a distance of 
150 feet dong tiie South skle of Haygood Road, runnmg 
a distance of 250 feet dong tiie Eastern property Une, 
running a distance of 150 feet dong the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 250 feet akng 
the Western property Une. Said parcel contains 37,500 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUCSL 

17. An Ordinance upon AppUcation oi Rosso and 
Mastracco, hic, for a Conditional Use Permit for an 
automobile service station in conjunction with a Tinee 
Giant convemence grocery store d the Southwest 
comer of SlKve Drive and Starfist Road, on Lots 1 thru 
8, Block D, Lynnhaven Park. Saki parcel contains 1 
acre. LYNNHAVEN BCSIOUGH 

18. Ajd Ordmance upon AppUcation oi NeU C. McCloud 
for a Conditiond Use Permit for a residentid kennel on 
certam property kxated on the South sidr oi MiU 
T ffnriing Road beginning d a point 1500 feet more or 
less West of Morris Neck Road. Property is know as 
1665 MiU Landmg Road and contains 8 acres. PUNOO 
BCHIOUGH. 

19. AnOrdmance upon ^pUcation of Anita Pdon for a 
Cbnditiond Use Permk for a home occupation 
(babysitting) on site 7, Lot 6, Pembrdce Shores 
Townhouses, Sectkn Om. Property is kxated at 4500 
St. John Court and contauis 4639 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

20. i^Ordimmce upon AppUcatkn(tfCdonid Baptist 
Church for a Conditiond Use Permit for a church on 
certam property kxated on the West skle of CenterviUe 
Turnpike begmnmg at a point 1000 feet more or less 
{South of Lynnhaven Parkway, nmning a distance of 
3IO6O feet more or less dong the West side of 
GenterviUe Turnpike, runmng a distuice of 870 feet 
akx^ aknt the Soi^hem property liiw, running a 
distance of 405 feet along the Western property Une 
and running a distance of 645 feet akng the Northern 
property Une. Said parcel contams 10 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Application of Level Gteen 
Baptist Church for a pnditiond Use Pemut for an 
f i^i^ew\ to an existing duudi on the Southeast side of 
Level Green Boufevard begmning at a point 90 feet 
Northeast of dear Springs Road, runmng a distance oi 
272.67 feet dong tiie Southeast skle of Level Ckeen 
Boulevard, runnmg a distance of 1^.75 feet m a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 453.03 
fMt in a Southerly direction, running a distance of 
341 .38 feet in a Northwesterly direction. Saki parcel is 
located at 5869 Level Green Boulevard and contains 2.3 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BQROUCHL 

22. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Ranald T. Brock 
for a Conditiond Ihe Permit for retail safes ai garden 
siqqdies, equipment, and materid as a subsidiary use 
ton plant nursery on property located on the West side 
at Princess Anne Road 1016.38 feet South of Vaughan 
RpMl, running a distance of 544.19 feet akng the West 
s^ of Nncess Anne Road, running a distance of 629 
feet akng tiie Southern i»^operty Une, running a 
distance of 638.46 feet akng tiie Western property Une 
and runnmg a distance of 612.59 feet akng the 
Northern i^operty Une. Property is kxated at 1255 
Princess Anne Road and contains 8.33 acres. PUNOO 
BCKOUGH. 

STR^TCLO^IRE: 

23. AppUcatUB of Amerkan Realty Ttust for tiie 
dis«ntinuance. cksure and abandonment of a 15 foot 
wkk pareel on tiie Nortii sk}e of Laskmg Road 
begmning U a poiitt 860 fed more or tess East of Oriole 
Drive and running hi an Easterly directkn a distance ai 
1010.46 feet. Saki parcel oontahis 15,157 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

24. i^^cation (pf Davki F. and Tina L ElUs for the 
dacontinuaiMe, ^ure and aban d o nme nt at a portion 
<^ an undevek^ed 30 foot right-of-way as shown on 
tiiat idat entkted "Ckrdanne Farm-Sectkn Oie" aid 
recorded m t^ OlBce of tiie Clerk of Circuit Court m 
Map Book 47. P^e SZl-A, runnhig mvth from Hatteras 
Road to Chati^i Dri^. Saki paroel cottaim 7^)0 
square fed moiW% tess. KEMFSVUE BOROUGH 

25. Awrtkattioft'of Lee-Paul hivestments for the 
dtecottmuance^jrialwe uid abuidonment of a 15 foot 
afley bdween sit ^red and 53rd Street beghmmg at 
the Eastern boi^Ury of Aitemk AiwniK aiKl ninning 
m an Euter^ Jlic^Skn to the Western boundary d 
Oo^m Front Rout SakI parcel contams 5250 square 
feet. LYI^^lAVl^ BOROUGH 

26. Motkn of the Plamusg Qmmttskn oi the dty of 
^rginki Bm^ ^i^hua, to unend ud reonkmi Artk^ 
9, Sections 902(0). 912(c) and «2(c) of tiie Com^hen- 
si^ Zonoig OiAHUHe perttiUng to nrnrimum yard 
requvements in tiie B-1. B-2 and B-4 (Usfrkts when 
ai^ntoim an agrkukurd c&trkt. More detailed 
ioixindkn is avdtebte hi tiie Departmett of Flannu«. 

27. Motai of the PUuml^ Commkskn rfthe dty of 
\1rgkda Beach, ^^mia, to aiMiid and reorckun Articte 
1. S^ten 111 oftke Cdiqirehawi^ Zorag QR^anoe 
perUdd^i to defidtion of attoiKibite lervtoe staAn. 
More dddted tafenmtion is avdtebte m the Depet- 

ment of Fk^o^. 

28. Motion of the P^^ta« Ooonnkskn of te CSty of 

VvgiwaBcudi. Vugfa^ touneadnd reonttta Artkte 

4^^4edkn 401(b) of tiie Onpidi^ve Zo^ 

OiMnanee pertaining to use regutakns for roa<blde 

. stfate in the agrio^vd (Uttrkts. Ktac dettO^ 



:i'j 



information is availabte hi tiie Department of Pfamning. 

Plats with more detailed information are availabte m - 

the Department of Pfauming. 

AU mterested persons are mvited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott ^ 

Director of Phumhig ''- ' 

2T 

8/4 VB I 

157-1 ^^t 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



>%ginia: 

Tlie reguter nweting at the dty Goundl of Virgmia 

Beadi wiU be heard m the Council Chandlers (rf the dty 

Ikdl BuUding, Munidpd Center. Princess Anne 

Station, Virguua Beach, ^mia. on Monday, August 

23. 1982, at 7:00 P.M., U whidi tinw tiie foUowmg 

appUcations wiU be heaid: 

CHANGE OF ZC»4ING DISTRICT CLASSIRCATKM*!: 

KEMPSVILLE BCAOUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Hunt Contracting 
Co.. hic., for a Chaise ctf Zonmg District dassificatkn 
from R-5 Resktentid District to R-8 Residentid Distrkt 
on certain propertykxated on the North side of 
Fariament Drive beginning at a point 400 feet nrare or 
tess West (tf Yoder Lane, running a distance at 600 feet 
more or tess dong the North side of ParUment Drive, 
nmning a distance at 72.47 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 63.43 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 513.21 feet dong the 
Western property Une, running a distance erf 693.15 
feet dong the Ncxthem property Une and running a 
distance (rf 838.69 feet akng the Eastern property Une. 
Sdd parcel contains 11.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

OONDITIONAL U^ PERMIT: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

2. An Ordinance upon Application (tf W. M. Gunter for 

a Conditiond Use Pemut for UmdfiU on certam property ^:. 
located at 1105 Seaboard Road, runnmg a distance of 
872 feet more or tess dong the West si(te <rf Seaboard ; ; 
Road, running a distance of 786.43 feet in a;.: 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 935 feet , 
in a Northwesterly directkn, running a distance ot 
1432.70 feet akng tiie Western property Une and 
running a distance of 1184.44 feet along the Northern 
property Une. Saiil parcel contains 39.9 aa-es. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH v ' 

BAYSIDE BOROUCH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Apidication (rf C B. K., Inc., for ; 
a Conditiond Lbe Pemut for an automobUe and small : 
engine repair estabUshment on certain i^operty located 
on the South sicte of South Witdiduck Road begmnmg a 
point 130 feet more or less West <rf Indepeidence 
Boulevard^ ranning a distance of 95 feet more or tess 
akng the South skte of South Witehdudc Road, running . 
a distance (rf95 feet more or less akng the South side of 
South Witchduck Road, running a distance of 190.84 ; 
feet dong the Westem property Une, running a . 
distance of 77.09 feet akng the Southern property Une, 
runmng a distance of 35.33 feet m a Northeriy 
duection, runnmg a distance of 6.70 feet in a Westerly ,. 
direction, running a distance of 17 feet in a Northerly ' 
direction, running a distance <rf6.70 feet in an Easterly 
direction and running a distance of 156.41 feet m a ^ 
Northerly dkection. Said parcel contauis 16,988.4 ' 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGR 
AMENDMENTS: 

4. Motion of the Planning Commission of the dty of 
Vu-gmia Beach, Virgmia, to amend and reordam Artide ; 
1. Section 105 of the Comprehensive Zonmg Orduumce . 
pertaining to nom:onforming uses. More detaited 
information is availabte in the Department of Planning . 

5. Motion of the Planmng Conunission of the dty at 
^ginia Beach, Vuginia. to anwnd and reordain 
Sectkns 4.4(b) and 4.4(]) ot the Subdiviskn Orduumce 
pertainihg to nonconforming lots. More detaited - 
information is avaiteble m tiie Department of Pluming . 

6. Motkn (rf the Planmng Departntent Commisskn of 
the dty of Virgima Beach. Virguua, to amend and 
reordam y^tkle 4, Section 401(c) otthe Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance Ordinance pertaining to sheHer for 
farm employees. More (tetaited information is 
available in the Departnunt of Planning. 

7. Motion at the Flaniung Commission of the dty of - . 
^lyini* Baxht Virginia, to amend and reordain { : 
/^cte 2, Section 233 of tiie Comprehensive Zonmg ^ 
Qlrdinaiux pertaming to shelter for ferm empteyees. ^ 
llore detaited mformatkn is avaitebte m the Depart-r^j 
daent {rf^PUmnmg. ^ 
P^ with more detaUed information are avaUabte m^ 
the Department of nannmg. .> 
AU interested persons are invited to attend. \ 
Rutii Hodges Smitii ^• 
Cky dcrk 
15^6 
2T 
8/11 VB 






NOTICE OF PUBUC Iffi^UNQ 

The ^ginia Beach Board of Zonmg Appeals will 
cd^net V Pubfic Heariiw on Weteescfay. ^lgust 18. 
1962, at 7:30 p.m., m tiw Coundlduudxrs of tiie dty 
Ifall'BuUdmg, Munidpd Center, ^^kiua BeuA, 
^i^qiia. The staff brte^ wiU be U 7K)0 p.m. m tl^ 
Cby Manager's Confereux Room. The folkywii^; 
iqqriiiukns wfll ^H^eur on the a^nda. 
REGinj\R AG&€3!A: 

1. Davy S. Wuw requests a variance to allow parimvj 
<rf m$yx re<7ei^nd etpiqment m from of a b^dfa|i| 
insteul of beUuBd the nearest portkn of a bid&if |r3 
adjiKem. to a puMc street on Lot 1, Sedion 1, Euterttft - 
;ftrk, ^68 N. Unmhaven Road. Un^aven Borough. |: 

2. Thomas D. PanpHts Reqi»sts a vaiiimce of 2 J feet u>l 
a 7.2 foot skte ynd setl»ck {w^t aide) tetead ot lOf 
feet as re^sk^ (Moood stery ackUtuj^ on Lot 4, Moeki 
17, Stedflwlawn Heights. 408 Norfoft Avenue, ^gida] 
I fed^ Jtaongh. 

3. IteA V. Park re«w«ts a ^waaoe of 8 fed toa 2 tat j 
s^te yard setback (north skle) htttead of 10 Atet aai 
FNiuved (Mxessory 1^UUi« • gsv^a) on Lot 31, Btod(] 
2, S«:tkn 5. An«ona ^^|e, ^B tewon Arch. 

4. GeargeR.I^flkimp»tsav»MoeafSf^ttia5 
foot rev a^ skle yard MtiMda (north si^ histead of 



' J-p*-p-»**^ 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1982 



•«vi 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



PuWicHMring 



pHbNcHMring 



10 feet each as required (swimming pod) oa Lot 18. 
Block B, Phase 3, Part A, Chatham Hall, 1061 
Kempsville Road. Kempsville Borough. 

5. Ingram J. and Marie M. Bensoi request a variance 
of 5 feet to a 3 foot side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 8 feet as required (second floor deck) c»i Lot 16, Block 
7, Ubermeer, 103A 57th Street. Lynnhaven Bwough. 

6. Harry J. Tennien requests a variance of 6 feet to a 9 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Jeanne Street) 
instead of IS feet as required (steps and deck) cm Lot 1, 
Block 40, Section R, Pembroke MancM", 400 Betsy Ross 
Road. Bayside Borough. 

7. William Castle requests a variance of 17 feet to a 13 
foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as required 
(deck) on Lot 12, Block 13, Diamond Springs Homes, 
5608 Odessa Drive. Bayside Borough. 

8. Arthur J. Zachary requests a variance of 7 feet to a 
13 foot side yard setback (west side) instead Of 20 feet 
as required (deck and steps) on Lot 33, Prc^rty of L. 
H. PeterscMi, Birdneck Point, 796 Oriolf Drive. 
Lyimhaven Borough. 

9. Jesse D. Veazey requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as, 
allowed in a required frcmt yard setback (Breezy Pdnt 
Road) on Lot 15, Block G, SecticMi 7, Lake Placid, 1960 
Decathlon Drive. Princess Anne Bwough. 

10. Jdin T. Atkinson requests a variance of 22 feet to 
an 8 foot frcmt yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required and of 13 feet to a 12 foot side yard adjacent to 
a street (Atlantic Avenue) instead of 25 feet As required 
and of 6 feet to a 9 foot side yard setback (east side) 
instead of 15 feet as required on Lot 12, Block 3, 
Ubermeer, 54th Street and Atlantic Avenue. Lyimhav- 
en Borough. 

1 1 . L TorgerstMi requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(swimming pool) cm Lot 3, Block A, Section 1, Stratford 
Chase, 5109 Stratford Chase Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

12. William E. and Beverly J. Link request a variance 
of 6 feet 8 inches to a 3 foot 4 inch side and rear yard 
setbacks (southeast ccM-ner) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (access(N7 building - storage shed) on Lot 166, 
Section 1, Westrnweland Estates, 3533 Hilber Street. 
Lyrinhaven BOTOUgh. 

13. Th«nas P. Cannon requests a variance of 5 feet 6 
inches to a 4 foot 6 inch side yard setback (west side) 
and of 1 foot 2 inches to 8 foot 10 inch rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet each as required (accessory building - 
storage shed) oa Lot 167, Section 1, Westmoreland 
Estates, 3537 Hilber Street. Lynnhaven Bwough. 

14. Richard L. Vetra requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
foot side and rear yard setbacks (northwest corner) 
instead of 10 feet each as required (through lot - 
swimming pod) on Lot 738, Secticm 11, Malibu, 652 E. 
Coral Key. Lynhaven Bo-ough. 

16. Thranas C. Broyles requests a variance of 12 feet to 
a 3 foot rear yard setback instead of IS feet as required 
cm Lot 3, Lake Shore Park, 704 Crystal lake. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. C. H. Byler and Stanley WiUner d/b/a B & W 
request a variance to allow a perimeter driveway in the 
required 10 fcxjt setback where prcrfiibited when a 
ccmimercial zcming district adjdns a residential district 
and to waive the required screening and landscaping in 
this setback on Lots 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30, Section 2, 
Boulevard Mancx^, Virginia Beach Boulevard. Bayside 
BcH-cxigh. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Texaco, Inc., by M. C. Criscitiello requests a 
variance of 163 square feet of sign area to 375 square 
feet of sign area instead of 212 square feet as allowed 
m Parcels F4D and F4B, Parkway Shopping Center, 
Green Run, Corner of Lynnhaven Parkway and Dahlia 
Drive. Kempsville Bcx^ough. 

2. Allan and Susan Donn request a vaiance of 22 feet to 
a 28 foot front yard setback instead of SO feet as 
required (deck addition) on Lot 15, North Area. Secticm 
1, Sandbridge Beach, 2216 Sandfiddler Road. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

3. David L Thompscm requests a variance of 1 .8 feet to 
an 8.2 foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 10 
feet as required (residential additicm - garage) cm Lot 
3C, Parcel C, Subdivision #3, Baylake Pines, 4076 
Shore Drive. Bayside Borough. 

4. Susan L and William E. Hinton, II request a 
variance of 6.S feet toa 3.5 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 10 feet as required (deck) cm Lots 5 and 
7, Block 13, Section G, Cape Henry, 2273 KendaU 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPUCANTS MUST APPEAR BEFC^ THE 
BOARD. 

W. L Towers 

Secretary 

157-9 

2T 

8/11 VB 



:•;/. 



PwHc AhcuCM 



NMc AuctioM 



Take notice that cm Aug- 
ust 12, 1982 at 9:00 a.m. 
(XI the front steps c^ 
Banner Buick Inc.. 1800 
Las kin Road ^^jinia Be- 
ach, Va. 23454. Banner 
Buick Inc. wfll sell at 
public aucticm, for cash, 
reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the fdlowing 
motor vehicle: 
1975 Cadillac 6D49S5E51- 
7584 

Banner Buick Inc. 
Banner Buick Inc. 
DMV7317 
2T 

8/4 VB 
157-2 

TAKE NOnCE that on 
tte 13(h day of i^gust, 
19^, M the office ot 
Rixey.Hia^AMcKenry. 
Mottey P<siM Center, 700 
Nft i towwi ReMl, NorMk, 
V»., « 10:00 t.m., we 



shall expose for sale, re- 
serving to ourselves the 
right to bid, aiu) with 
reservation, oik (t) 1978 
(Xdsmobile Cutlass 2 dtxx- 
Identification No. iMTF- 
82406363, tided m the 
name of Derrick Hance, 
seized and repossess«f by 
virtue of a breack at a 
certain security agreem- 
ent dated April ^, 1981. 
Terms of the side are $100 
in certified Aimb as down 
IMjnnent, with the bataace 
diM in4f boun. 

Donald F. Bennn 

Co^el for 

PhillgK CXdsmobiles, tac. 

Very truly yours, 

Rney, HeiUg A McKenry 

157-S 

IT 

8/4 VB 

Gwalyn A. Day 

Gotectwn MuH^er 



PiibNcAiKtioas 



PiMcAuctfoM 



Take notice that on the 
13th day of August^ 1982, 
at the office of Rixey, 
Heilig & McKenry, Ston- 
ey Point Center, 700 New- 
town Road, Norfolk, Va^., 
at 10:00 a.m., we shall 
expose for sale, reserving 
to ourselves the right to 
bid, and with reservaticm, 
one (1) 1974 Ford 2 door 
Mustang Identificaticm 
No. F4F032439223, titled 
in the name of Dcmald G. 
Weimer & Barbara A. 
Weimer, seized and repo- 
ssessed by virtue of a 



breach of a certain secur> 

ity agreement dated July 

29, 1981. Terms of the 

sale are $100 in certified 

funds as down payment, 

with the balance due in 48 

hours. 

Donald F. Bennis 

Counsel for 

niillips Oldsmobile, Inc. 

Very truly yours, 

Rixey, Heilig & McKenry 

157-7 

IT 

8/4 VB 

Carolyn A. Day 

Cdlectcm Manager 



In a Little Over 1 8 Months, 
the Library Department's 
Delinquent Accounts Collector 
Recovered $25,709 in Late Fines 

At erne time cm- andher everycme checking a book out 
of a Virginia Beach library has probably returned it 
late. It appears to be a relatively simple procedure to 
return the material, pay the fine, and be cm one's way 
in a matter of minutes. 

For the library staff, however, it is far frcmi simple. 
In a year's time the Virginia Beach Public Library 
devotes approximately 12,500 staff hours at a cost of 
$56,250 for procedures relating to nearly 107,500 items 
which may be overdue during that year. In other 
wcM^ds, each overdue costs the library ahnost $2 to 
process. Less tangible mcmetarily, but no less costly, is 
the inconvenience caused for other library users who 
might be waiting for the item. 

Secticm 17-6 of the Code of Wginia Bicach (with 
similar provisions in Sectiwi 42.1-74 of the Code <rf 
Virginia) provides the legal basis for dealing with 
overdue materials. "Any perscjn having in his 
possessicm any book or dher property of any public 
library, or any of its branches, mobile units or 
cdlections, which he shall fail to return within 30 days 
after receiving notice in writing frcmi the custodian,' 
shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor; provided, 
however, that if such books should be lost or destroyed, 
such a person may, within 30 days after being so , 
notified, pay to the custodian the value of such bcx>k. 
the value to be determined by the public library 
board." 

The library, in fact, makes a great effcMt to contact 
Ubrary users and remind them of overdue materials. A 
week to 10 days after the materiid is due, a library staff 
member selects the cards identifying overdue items, 
checks the shelves to determine if they have been 
inadvertently "*eturned to the shelves, identifies the 
library user having the materials and then telephcmes 
to remind the user to return the material. 

If the user is not at home, a pc»t card is mailed. A 
month later, the cards for those materials still 
outstanding are selected, the shelves checked once 
again and a letter is mailed infcnming the user of the 
overdue material, the date due and outlining procedu- 
res and fees in effect. The end of the letter states: 
"Failure to return or pay the replacement cost of these- 
materials within thirty (30) days of the date of this letter 
will necessitate (1) action by the Delinquent Accounts 
Cdlector, (2) assessment of a $6 cdlection charge and 
(3) the automatic revocation of library provileges of the 
hdder of the card number listed above." 

The Delinquent Accounts Collector is part time 
Ubrary employee who since Jantuuy. 1982. has spent 
20 hours per week gdng to the homes of citizens with 
overdue materials and ccdlecting those items. In a little 
over 18 mcmths, this work has resulted in the recovery 
of 1,574 items worth $25,709. At the time of the 
pickup, the user is charged a $6 fee which is payable at 
the branch library owning the books cc^ected. 

With the installation of an automated circulation 
syltem within the next few months, the task of 
identifying and tracking overdue materials will be 
greatly reduced for library suff members. The system 
will automatically identify overchK items and wiU 
produce overdue notices to be mailed to the library 
user. It will also prevent users with overdue materials 
from checking out additional items until the outstand- 
ing items ot fines are satisfied. Wblk the librafy will 
dmtinue to provide reminders, it will be the user's 
tesponsibility to return items promptly to avoid the 
automatic curtailment (rf check out privileges. 

It is important to remember, that {he library is most 
interested in the return of items. The library's 
co^ec^ons are intended to serve all Virginia Beach 
residents. When a bock ot record is not returned on 
time, not only does the library staff Tiave to divert its 
energies frcxn directly hel|Mng the u^ in the library, 
but the dtiun loc^ng and waiting fc^ that material is 
denied service. 



Sheriffs Music 



The Virgiiua BeKh 
SherifTs Associatioa will 
{Mresent an evenliv ctf Uue 
grass mittic to be held on 
SuMby. Sei». 12 at tl» 
Ce^r far Effective Lea- 
ning on WitcMuck Ra«d. 

The featured wtistt wiU 
be The Oibome Brotten. 

"ftoweds wU help tte 
^riiTs ^socMtion to 
better iMet ite Meds oi 



our area's senior citk- 
ens." saM an assodatide 
spiAesman. Also, the 
associatioD wiU seodar# 
haadicanied and und^' 
IHivikuri chikfaen to te 
(xmcera^t^ed on the 
numberoT MtvMce tkkM 
sates. 

Hckeu mKf be oMaM* 
ed by calBi* 464-4242. 



Classified Ads 



Index Of Post Classifieds 




il. ivtlntM Equipment 


2. PtrioMli 


32.aii»im*sFwll«iit 


3.UstaFMMd 


33. Apartintnts Ftr Rtnt 


4.IMH 


34.llMiinF«rRMt 


S.TnMftt 


35. H«MM F«r Rwit 


•.Vam 


38.llMlEtlst« 


It HottfCydM 


37 Ut* For Sal* 


••■Mtl 




•.CaMNrt 


39. PraftitiamI Strvtett 


10. Ntllp WmHn 


40.SMvkn 


11. FsdtlfM Wtnttd 


41. C«v«ntry 


llluiMttOwortiinity 


42.ClilMCara 


13.Nt« 


43. Cwwrtta/MasiHiry 


14.iJvMtock 


44.EI«:trieal 


&«• n^pNINOM 


4S. Extainiinatbig 


l«.Ai1iciMFfrSate 


40. Firaptacat 


n.fmiitm 




ll.iWi«iM 


40. hntoiKtiaii/EOiicatlaN 


It.McyciM 


40.llllaviR|OHaHllRg 


20. Ihnical ImtnmMflts 


50. Masic Latsans 


21. TtltvMM/StwM 


51Paintii« 


22.Jtw«lnr 


52,niatagra^y 




53. nana Tunlngfltapair 


24.Wmtt4T«0qr 


54. Rafrigtratiaii 


2S.6«o4IMiipt«bt 


55. Ramadallflg/Daearating 


21. IirtwIalMMiit 


50.Sawln|liAltantlans 


27.eanft/YsriSalM 


ST.SaiarEaainr 


20.FlrawM4 


50.T«Sarvica 


20.Uiniai0wiM 


59. EnargyCanaarvatian 


30. FtnN C^uipMMi 


SO. MIscallaiiaam 1 



l.Ai 



WANTED TO RENT-Rctirad 

lady on fixed income needs 2 
bedroom cottase or ground 
floor apartment in Chesapeake. 
Must Iw reasonable. Call S4S- 
6476. 
l-lT-^4 

CUFIO STUNDT-Let us And 
your mate or date. Sent '2 for 
information to P.O. Box 9323, 
Norfollc, VA 23S03. 
MT-S-lg 

WE BUY ALL (rades of paper, 
steel beverage cans, and 
aluminum beverage cans. 
UdewatCT nbre Corp. 1958 
Diamond Hill Road, 
Ches^xalce. 543-5766. 

HH/4 

LADIES WANT To look years 
younger? - Let me show you how 
with an Aloe Vera fackl for you 
and your friends. Call 420-1892. 
l-4T-g/4 

UFE AFTEB LIFE introduc- 
tory program at the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion August 7, 1982, 
10:30 ajB. Sponsored as a 
pubUc service by EOCANKAR. 
CaU480O661. 
1-3T-J/4 

HOUSESITTEItS - Christian 
married couple available star- 
ting in S^tember. Bonded, 
refoences available. Contact 
usatl.616-873-28S7. 

1.4T-8/11 



2.Port«Mis 



CREDIT PROBLEMSr- 

Recdve a Mastercard or Visa 
with no credit check. Guaran- 
teed. For free brochure, caU 
Houw of Credit, TOLL FREE 
1-800-442-1531 anytime. 
fc£Ltl« 

CMEMXt rmOKMMK Receive a 
Mastercard or Visa with ' no 
credit check. Guaranteed. For 
firee brochure, call House of 
Credit, T(%,L FREE 1-800-442- 
1531 anytime. 
24T8-18 

WANTED: UNVSUAL Ideas 
on aiqr subject for puUicatioa in 
book form. Share appor- 
dooatdy in royahia received 
over an extended period of time. 
No inveitment necessary. 
C.O.I. , P.O. Box 5054. 
Chesapeaka.Va. 23324. 

2-I0T-9/15 



lUttftFiMi 



REWARD IM.00 - Mottled 
broam tptytA fimale cat, loat in 
die vicUtyaf Noioova Eitates 
ud (keaiMcr nuns. Qdl547- 
1846. 

3-<T-i/4 



DATSUN • tm, 240Z, 4 
veed, AM/IM radio. Fair 
cottdilioB. Call 623-1191 
before 12 aopK «MI aqr time 
we^caaA. 

»4T-a/25 
TBVNMI^aiD - 1976, 

ooam^a. 13^0. Qdl 423- 

7675. 

*^4/2S 

AOM-ifSI, 3000S, aa/fm 



MataA Caa«l- 
OMO. 

4.1T-M 

iUQtl97», lapri, 2 deor, 



4.AbIm 



VOLESWAGON-1965, beauti- 
ful, 34 miles to the gallon. 
•950. Call 483-362). 

44T-8-25 

VOLKSWAGON-I966, ex- 

cdlent condition. '800. Call 

428-4736. 

4-1T4- 4 

CHRYSLER-1980 LeBaron, 
excellent condition, power 
brakes, 6 cylinder. CM 461- 
2731, after 6 «all 420-7289. 
4-41-^-4 

CADlLLAC-1972, Coupe de 
Ville, fully loaded, am/fm 
stereo, need minor repair. 
'500. CaU 467-6584. 
4-1T-8-4 

VOLK8WAGON-1978, Con- 
vertable, air, am/fm stereo, ex- 
cdlent condition, only 40,000 
miles. n.OOO. CaU 421 -9725. 

4-4T-8-25 

pbNTIAC-1974, Grandville, 
new tires, new exhaust system, 
n^ battCTy, new water pump 
and new ignition system. Very 
good condition. *700. CaU 
547-1673 any time. 
4-4T-g2 5 

CHEVY-Citation, 1981, 4 
door, 4 cyUnder, 4 speed with 
warranty, •6200. CaU 463- 
4138. 

4-1T-8-4 

CADiLLAC-1973 Fleetwood 
BroughaU, 4 door, tUt wheel. 
spUt boich seats ijrith 6 way 
powCT, am/fm 8 track stn-eo, 
electric antenna, plus much 
more. '1,295. CM 545-7880 
f<w more information anytime. 
4-4T-8-2 5 

1976 MONTE Carlo Landau 
Perfect running condition. Air 
conditioning, power brakes, 
powR- steCTing. Burgundy with 
tan vinyl top and interiw. Low 
mUes. $2,400. CaU 422-8868. 
, 4^T-8/4 

HONDA - '81 Accord LX, 
sUvcr, 5 speed, air, AM/FM, 
20,000 mUes, $7,000. CaU 8-4. 
Monday-Friday at 423-1270, ext. 
313. 
f4T4 /4 

OLDSMOBILE-1977, Toro- 
nado BfDogham excellent ccm- 
dition. AU power, am-fm, 8- 
track stereo. CaU 855-7768. 
Mr±l8 

MGB-1967, Classic, conver- 
table, spoke wheels Uke new, 
back speaken, new seats, ex- 
ocfleitt condition. CaU Dd)bie 
466-7278. 

MT-t-IS 

GALAXY FORD-1968. Good 
ConditioB. •700 cash. CaU 
467-5011. 

4-4T-IH8 



4.il|llM 



10.iMpWaetMl 



1971 OLDS ENGINE - 350«bic 
indi. BxceUent condition. 1250. 
547-7645. 

4TFN 



S.Tnwlis 



SAUS REPRESENTATIVE- 

Commisrion, ideal part time 
situation. Regional distribute 
of Satellite TV Antennaes, 
need ambitious local represen- 
tative to market this entol^- 
meitt system. CaU I-804-7SS- 
8193. 



WHEELS - 5 deluxe white. 
Styled for Ford FISO Ranger 
XLT15"x51ug. Brand new. 
$125. Hub caps, 16: Chevy 
4WD Brand new. $5. each. 
421-9725. 

MT-8/4 

TRUCK CAMPER SHELL - 
Leer Deluxe. White fiberglass 
with sUding front window. 
Like new, used only 4 months. 
$500. 421-9725. 

- 5-1T-8/4 

FORD-1966 pick-up 
Econottnc, new tires, idr con- 
ditioning, vCTy dependable. 
'350. CaU 547-1673 anytime. 
5•4T-^25 



10.4T-8-lg i 



7. M«torcyelts 



SAUS-Exclusive new product 
Une not soU h) stores. Ground ' 
floor snxwtunity to ear '100 a ' 
week port time. CaU 420-1892; ' 

- lO-T-8- 4 ' 

— ) 

HELP WANl^^ - Camp 
ground h^ wanted, Spring an^j 
summer appUcations now bongn, 
accepted for our registrati«s > 
desk, sto^s, swimming poob,T 
maintenance, outside grounds^- 
and recreational faculties. Apptf'* 
between 10 am. and 2 pm. Mon- 
day thru Thursday, Holday 
IVavd Park. 1075 Ooieral Booth 
Blvd.. Virginia Beach, dr caU 
425-0249. 

1017TS-25 



] 



YAMAHA-1979, 750 special, 
red tear drop tank, low 
mUeage. '1400. CaU anytime 
425-5528. 
7^T-8-18 

79 HONDA GL 1000-Black 
with gcrid trim. Complete tour 
kit. AM/FM stereo radio & 
cassette tape player. Cruise 
control garage kept. 11,500 
mUes '3,500. CaU 547-8413. af- 
ter 5 p.m. 
, 7-TFN 

MOTORCYCLE - '74 Honda 
CB360, very low mUes, $650. 
CaU 428-7531. 

7.4T-8/11 



HELP WANTEa>-DeUvery in- ' 
stallation pasonnel needed, t ' 
Male oi female, students 
welcome. CaU after 8 p.m. 
daUy 497.6188 (M- 495-1051 . 

• KMT-MS 

PART TIME Hdp - In return for 
boarding your horse. CaU 421- 
3020. ■, 
: 10-4T-8/4| 

6 LADIES NEEDED - for saidi j 
work. Car iwcessary, flexaWe j 
hours. Ideal for young mothers. J 
Earn exceUent profits. CaU 499- i 

6734. ; 

lOTFN I 



8. Boats 



GLADSTONE-16 foot, with 
Johnsons 100 horse power 
motor. '850. CaU 482-1236. 
8>4T-8-2 5 

SAIL BOAT - Coronado. 25 
foot. 2 sails, 7.5 Mercury elec- 
tric start outboard. fuU gaUey, 
sleqjs 5, roU^ reefing boom, 
an dl US Coast Guard required 
equipment, many extras. . 
$9500. CaU 408.4204. 
MT^ 

BOAT - ISVi fiberglass, 35 hp 
Evinrude motor, with traUer. 
AU for $1500 negotiable. CaU 
463-4550 

8-4T-8/11 



HOUSEKEI7ER • Uve-in. 
Salary and room and board for 
mature single adult. Non- 
smoker. CaU 420-5600. 
. VHl-im 

•50,000 to •80,000 -peryear 
Are you bored with your job? 
Tired of working for the other, 
man? National Company 
looking for qualified ^ and 
part time dbtributors in two- 
county area. Investment 
covered tqr inventory. CaU 1- 
800-354-9594. 

l(MT-6^ 



11. PosKioRS WoRtos 



9> CMRpWS 



APACHE MASA - All 

fibe^lass pop up. ExceUent 
condition. Forced air funuue, 
gas, electric, running water, 
sleeps 6, insulated, electric 
brakes. MustseU. $1,600. Ex- 
tra wiU be thrown in. CaU 623- 
5827. 

9-4T-8/25 



NURSES Afl>E - 8 yens ex- 
perience. Private i^rsing. . 
Prefer day hours. CaU 857-66Q;Z. 

'. IHT-y4 

HOUSE CLEMWER -bouse and 
office cleaning, daUy or weekly. 
References. CaU 855-9614. 

n-n^M 

CARET AKER-Professi(mal 

couple. Any area. CaU 1-804- 

232-7341. 

"-«T-8-18 

RN-RESPONSmJE and dQwn- 
dable for iKMne healdi care. ICU 
and privtte duty ei^Mrience. 
Fkxlbie hours. Ooeoaoeeeut. 
CaU 588-4548. ANYTIME Otj 



caUS87-07?«. 



H-4T-S/4 



bo peep 

found her$h0ep and a lot more 
In the clasnlfled ad$ . . . 

You'll find what you're looking for. too. Our daily 
classifieds can help /Ow 'md a job, sell' a car, buy a 
boat, hire a babysitter even give away the cat's 
kMtena* Call the classifiess now. 

Sun/Post Ciassifiods 

486-3430 




oMm^tn. 



We want you td discover high quality, name 
brand fashions at reasonable prides!! To 
accomplish this we are offering you a very 
special bonus not available to the 
general public: 

Pr^nt this coupon and receive a special discount of 
off the original price of any oiu item 
from our &kUxt stock 



Vi 



— OFFER AVAILAU£ AT -nffi POLLOWINO LOCATIONS 

WILLNER'S 

ODU— 1076 West 47* Strtet, Norfolk, VA 
CHURCHLAND— 3130 Wst^n Bnndi Blvd.. Omuftt^t, VA 
FAmFmLD~3222-4 F^fWd Aen^ GiMr. Vk^t WmiA, VA 
PLAZA ONE- a^l^Stt«rt,litetfol^VA 



44T-S-^ 



«♦ 



Beack Sub. Angmt 4. 19«2 13 



Classified Ads 



ILHti 



IS. 



Sin. 



QACU- 



tljm. CMi42l- 
lHT-y4 



■de by 
ade •19S. 1 two door 'IIS. 2 
air cammaam, MBO nu. 
*1S0 Hd 11.000. *1I3. KoH 
waster *t3. Aaaaa 

r*iis. cuisn-noi. 




vns. 



Good 
abnM. S3S. 421- 

15-IT-S/4 



CIBCBmC {S|BEB« ai^B B9B HiB SBBf * 

■d dnfcn. 



KAGU nnm-Puc uood 

p«^ 7 weeks aid. m AMC 
Om< te kiHlan or pels. 
rwiiii «J^ aariw ««. G» 
MMHS or S«7-2ns alkr's 



lS^-1^* 

SjOBO 

toMgOOOnUs. SlQOloSltS. 
OdlM9liw304mS. 

15-«T-«/4 



13-«r-»-l« 



U. 



li. 



try 
io^ '123. Dcycr. 



•US. 



is-cr-8-2s 



,•558. 

■d»a.'35. 
rbedrafls.*5B. Gril 
fin-«310aflcr3pjL 

1«^T«2S 



K 3. 

riiidHihmMi.HBaaew. •250. 
Ctfl4C7409O. 

15-«T<»^ 



THEV mYLLADY 



• Gks 



ALSO 

■•^^ptelMay* A«r Material 



40-5227 



■DIG 

pkle. '125. Lafies 10 tpeeA 
lfte.1S. GtfdJMOM. 
lfr^-0-25 

TBST 4 raST-ShemoB Sqde 
Qocca wx bed. Mriid 
by 
Om 
of a Uad. •3300. Maayi 



85V0171. 



tma. Cd 
16-7r-S-l« 



BBOTHES SEWING 
MACaiNE^nth calnct. cx- 
cdhat condhioB HO. Odaf- 
ter5pjL«S.9G2. 

1<^<T-«^11 



ATTENTION!! 

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 
FULLTIME EMPLOYMENT. CALL547-MT7, 
Mr. Hcpfcr BETWEEN 8 ft 9 AM. 



jk#l«HM>* . 



Wbca SoiMttiiV Needs 
BidMiiv or Bcpdicd. Ym Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

HonK Iiiii»t>veiiient 

spedalttt 

• BoAim Gooliaclor • Koo6 • OKporii • < 
• Bath Remodeled • RooiB AdtttioBs 
• Ahmiimai syinp • Kftdien RcBMdded 

545-73U 

H^E.BMfc,ar. 





la 



fv 



Mwlilfclii^Sliii 



lAn 11, fat«i2 Am 
Woodi I. 3 - 5. 
oovcra. Ex- 
S300. «0- 
2t72.»-2S40. 

ic^rjai 

CBwilk 




plByp(K.hi^< 
Attelaiiy*»i 

Qttan HmA JbM%tc (New 
>.)Q««M944. 




41. 



47. 



cffecu. ^aipfcoBji 
.4SM391. 




S75. Staleit 



17. 



2LT< 



TRT 



J.l«" - 2W. 0.1" 

■iiiiwa .S75.faral. Od 

3I»4»16. 



m»arCM 



ACT TAKE 

■■d iMam d Kc aew. S290 
ford. CSa 4224424. 

iMLiai 



110 fliillWMII 



I BASS IJ 

* 1 S po 



VATEBSIVTraai. 

■took, perfect 
fiSBjOOQdi 34^5719. 
l»^-«/l l 

■ABY ITEKB - Low prices oa 




GMKr SCREEN IV 
BBC - TV pnyectia 

■y TV iMo t foot 
Crest for ciU^ wpat- 
U. S29.99. Dealer — iil 
CUiS4S-Z393. 

21-4T^11 



OUTSTANMNG OTKHI- 
TUNITV-Ia wte teati^ 
H^ ^ofit. 
•MjOOOl 
423-719(2. 

^£L!^ 

LOUNGE MMI SALE-^SjQOe 

oa|r.cal4Z7-«ei. 

32-«r-o-a3 

STOEES AND STIMbkCE 

AEEAS - Al sias. fto pei l i B 
■aBwHrrt M»viB CoMEaib. 
39M)90.«4>127S. 

ntPN 



CAE«nT«Y. PAINTING. 

aad al ^pa of 
Stena 




Vnt 
itr«ctiaa.4aM433 




C^UICAEE • OCEMIA. 

Neck Ana. 



IT*Bif 



Nrl 



Davs. 



OBI. 



<HT-y4 



Ckcat teidfe. 4 



lOIVTAL 



play peas. kiH 
SKxe. At dhe ■aby's 



■«d. aai 
ffiearWe 
CS4«. 



LIVING EOmt •WTE-4 



423-7923. 



Neck 
AMo.)Crii406- 

lfr<r-l/ll 



12^-M« 



for a knri 
asHK. CM 
3i3l after 64» p.a. aad 

24-41-1/1 1. 



office. 402-3373. 
14i2.30J 



33TFN 



Very 
CaE4«»-2ZM. 



.lots OS 



^upimiKt. C02 cjdiadcr. 
n^ahttr. kec ap- M25. PVC 
FSpe 




3 

SlewoCSkiaef-lS"l 
aorage qiace for 
lepnrd*. Itas 9asqr fcd.n>-feei 
tape deck aad SiMy letcivtr 
SKASO. 30 w«B per cftaaaeL 2 
siKabrs. SP2000. ^poe 
for tvaoUe. Al for 

•sn-Caisn-stii. 

,17TFN 



CASH PAID - Yw^ 

Co. pays cask for aa- 

oid faiai iai e, fkwk*. 

.oipasa- 

oUi 

! toys. Wc bay 

Abo, pood 
CSI 4224477 

24TFN 



CaSMK BON - ADULT 
LIWIG aear Ooeaaa * 
Neck. 1.2 ft 3 



4MT-04 




DATCAJBCca- 

■cau 2 
field trips. 



42«-7if2. 



33TTN 



■ ABIMIIING . Moifeer of S 

*• * » ■ 



u. 



Ctf«M29St 



G-fT-t/\ \ 



anhqispiand 



tTHwS sel for S40O. 

1171. 



lfr^-0/4 



HAVE TO MOVE 

tracks, took, aad 
radios, 344 diy copjr 
Cd399<M22. 




4S7.0IM. 



dale. ISO. Es- 
•3g000. Cd 



MALEDANCEB-A riath far 
€23400. 

BACXBBWfG-arek; 

aolS Saleai Bowl. 
Ctf 4M-32fi2 




BABMIIUNG - ia b; ei- 
: by the day or 



iS3-2»53. 



3t-lT-»4 



JMLH* 



HANTS. ^UkUnrVL. fal 

W bsapae pliais. S4A1. 
Laise variety to dnoee ftoas. 
Seei^ is bcfieriag! OB 406- 
€703. 
l»-4r-t/4 



nrOBV CULLECT10N - 

Statacs. Netsike. Orieatal 
scre^, silks. Ctoisoaac 
; Vases aiMlBaaesl IBM 
F Si.. 623-9119. Daly 10.3. 
ItTFN 



for 



PECAN fSABIWia 

ivibaih 

niiiwi ~7 — •" 



2612TO-11 <^l422-aS33. 



u 



36-4T-&^ 



UJ IiN T BK DAY CABE - Ot- 

cu 

■SUMMER 
FUN" protiaai! Two 
bmioas, Grcea Baa (427- 
1»1) aad ladHB L^ (467- 

42-4T-S//1I 



AQUABllM. CUSTOM 

approxiHtf^ 33 galloas 

HeJ^S'lO^.depaiT*. 

3'ir 



19. 



FBSWOOD - 3 corIi of bar- 
dwood blocks Cbeecb aad o^ 
S173. defivered - ia loo loBilhs. 
r to 14' SISO. Cd 235-2205. ' 
2S-<T^4 



aad gravel iadaded. FsHfcat 
lioa. COO. 3^4101. 

164T-S/4 



HUFTY 15 SPEE2H9 
ans B^ bkK. 26lBcb. o^r 
yew old. very pood i 
■63. OwiaeaceBa 
no. Cd4tl-074». 

I94T»'1I 



2iLUOTiA 



Opea yov owa Jeaa Shop- 


Laife Wew-iaCsatfrCUUrea 


or Wcstcra Wear Store. 


•12.300. Coopkie suae te- 


dadng fiAares. sappies. ia- 


vcaUJiy. Over 200 aaae bna- 


diavaBaUe. BuaaduyMiftre 


w Appard Center (Party Piaa 


PackMC •6300.) Taince 


1000 074 4700 iJd. 4. 




JOYNEB PBOFKSIONAL 
LA.<«QSCAPING awl tawa ss- 
vice.;^M csOBMcs. 543-««i. 
f 'S 29TFW 

■MnXS-MTTLEB AlW SC» 



dwood, chKkioad, mf siee. 
Proiea year shndis. Ge* aow 

■Me oa sde. We driver ia oae 
day. l334S30ar 035-7467. 

29TFN 



fjf ffiv^ , ratffaif orlur^? 
San/l^otdoirififdiaiethe 

Ptoce yon km cost, tinick actn« danified ad 
to^. QA 446-3430 or md^hndycoiqxm. 
We're here to hc^yoo with TOW Bd. i 

20 wofds or less. 1 week, only •4.00-4 weeb. 
oi^y'lliW (The fourth week is free). Youradwffl 
IBB to CBch issue of the Vn]pBio Beach Sod aad 



MyChoslfltiAd 



ATTENTION 

Scfimis Job Scdc«rs! 

Would yon like to set your own hoars wtth 
I^actically no Hmit on earnings and have' 
vacaticHis as deaicd? If so. then why not 
conveniently work with us SMting/lMindMi^ 
mail. Receive work and payments by mail. 
Start imm^iately! For information, a 
self addressed, stamped envelope assures 
aprtmqxrqriy. 

Maa Marketing Services. 
P.O. Box 2590. Oscala. FL 32678 



BEPdsSESSED SIGNt- 

fia&a^ dowa! Take over 
paynMOts *50.^ aaiatUy. 
4'a|-flasbB« arrow ^a. New 
buBs. ktten. HaleSiias. Cal. 
l-O0O-227-l617.Eja.6p. 

31- 
31-1T-0-4. 

BBSTAUBANT EQUIP- 

k^VT-Q^ew-BscoadUoaaO 
saf^plies tad pvts. "We ser- 
vice wbtt vre seO." Dixie 
E4hlpaMat Coaspaay, 316 
W«t 21st Street. Norfc^ 
VapaM 23517. 623-7073. 

31-4r-»-lS 



SUBBOGATE WIFE wiO 

deaa, oooc, nop. caacr. na 
b-nsals, care far plaan aad 
pets; caretaker. QmBfifd ^di 
refiereaccs. OrilSaS-7Bi6. 

WtiS^m 

BOOKKEEPLNG-MoatUy 
baiaace sheet. P A U 
trial bdaoe froa y< 
■id iwriiWi, s t a b s, or i 
^MS. 94rs aad VA-rt. Vf 
to 200 dKCkhoiA tmsadiaas 
wMthly; '45. PayaUcs. 
receivable, null payrofl. 
r^WTTT**^" 0^- Cril 420- 
6623. 
39-TFN 

BOOKING SEBVKZ -iMdaiiiV 

9Bartaly p^roO reports aad 
baak accoaat recoadlialiaa. 
SfjecBBzag B wd proprciUir- 
s^». Pick wp sad delivery. 
Bctired prafesrioaaL Cd 420- 
5624. 

39TTN 



47. 



ADDITIONS. BOOMS- 

carpcatiy. roofuf. sidiag. 
low, itorai doors, 
thiiiii . ooacrcte 
work. 




TYPING »BVICE 



Fw 



bmisrt. iifetiaM 
t of Vagos Beach. Oast 
A resBodeliag, carp«>>try. 
BMSOory, etc. Plaas drawn. 
Qaality workaiaaship at 
ficmoosDw pfiocs. GOV^ViBBO. 
No job MO sanril. Ckl Jofaa 
Gatf. D at 464-4392 or 463-2287 
after SKDp JO. 

47TFN 



days a week, IBM Selectric 
Reawaiah ic rates. Cd eMMr 
467-7112. KeapsvOe area, or 
463-0236, lfilui|vl>cadvake ar- 
ea. 

40TFN 

BOOEEEEPiSB - WB do bopks 
ia say hone. Experieaoed*. ia 



A-1 



ADOITHW 




I 



o 

roB ad for ( ) 1 week, ( ) 4 weeks or ( ) 
Wifl stopped. Co«is*124IOfor4weeksfor&st 
WOT^. 20*fweBA addMoiMil word. 



mm 






NOW OPEN! 

Tidewster TnidHi^ Gnter 
14^] 



^Ktioas. Bnymc S^flf. 1 
Amk^es Wanted. O m s^ u nci^ Aceqitod. 
Now Rettii« 9iap SpBoe. 



Di^ 543-21tf 3r7-«54S Ni^ls 




420-91106 



Pkk-v aad defivery servke. 
Cd S4S-40W after 3 pja. for 
; nf orattioa aad latos. 

40TFN 



ADDITIONS - lUxMas. i 

coavert gara^s. decks, etc. 
tjaabty work by a Kccascd 
bdder. Ftec cstiaBttes. Cd 340- 
23llaayiiaBe. 

47TFN 



» 





Soath Drivel Thelitee 

FleaB^ke 





ETery Saturday, Sbi^ay & Holidays 



I'Mm^^m 



Frecsinccffori 

0^422-3104 9toS iw54S-«ll 



BARNS 

Free deUvery 
inTidewaiar 

QuaHty buMt by: 
STilTf 

9lf|43M«aBw. ISO 




train 



• isnus 

•MfSOE 




OfmAPkceMllieisUttd 



!■ Brigwid's Buy, IMko, N.C. 



PBrcd 23 Heavify BFOoded with huge live 
OBks. Aven«e ckvBtioii 10.7*. Survejped 
with cow:rt^ markers 120* x 107'. 
Located on canal. Ready to build. 
•23,000. SooK owner fii^idi^. 
Pared 19. Ob anal pfaoted ^niroximatdy 
U* X 120*. Siqiafo vkw. Pvdoo Sound. 
•17.300. Gooqileie owner mmtm. 

fl. E. McOadcM 



ADOmONS AND OS- 



yasdioplar. Cd425- jan. 



kiteb^, batlvooais. etc. 
Qadty work aiicasoadle raKs. 
fVee csliHMes ^ad idcrcaoes 
MiapeA.AIwack 
I by stale boosed eoa- 
iracur. Cd Ml Moaene. «l- 



47TTN 



B«es.AI 
types of carpcairy repair. 
1 liaii. frae desigi 
tree ettiaHies. Alaayi 
bst. Cd 543-0«6 far a 



47TFN 



WALLPAPEBING - Be^tiM 



Nojobuw 
a«ht. fne 
4r-3S!3. 



Cd day or 
Cd 



47-4r->/l8 



AWNI Wta. STtMtM WIN- 
DOWS, doors, pabo covers, 
wteg. siiftiiiag Hsd feaciag. 
Order now before the ipriag 
nsh. Awricu Awai^ Cb.. 
4231 Ponsaoath Blvd. 4gS- 
0000. 

47TFN 



GUITAB LESSONA- 

Begiaaers. Private iastrac- 
tioBS. Low rales. Lcai^ is 
relaxed anaosphere. Cd 4(0- 
2)90. 

304T-S-H 



51. 



WALLPAPEBING AND 
PADrriNG - Fan and friemOy 
service, local refereaeat for- 
Bobed. Call as for /a free 
rttiaiMr Anlair and CooHMBy 
Bedecoratii^ Coturacton. 420- 
34Tt. 
5nFN 

PAMTING - Lsve or satd 

jobs, latenor ^ad extenor. Free 
estiwates. Very reasoaable 
prices. Rdiereaces avaflable apoa 
rcqaesL CoauBcrdal vforfc ^so 
doee, and fi^i carpeatry aai 
wallp^xriag ex pcri eace. CaO 
397-54S3ar484-l42S. 

51TFN 




BATBBOOM BMOI^UNG - 

Old aad adw. SpediMntm in 
ceraauc tik walls aad floor 
ooveraig. Kfawwable rales. Ftcc 

Tidevraier sea. StaaD aad large 
jobs. GawBtee afl work. Cd 
547-4774 nytine. 

55TFN 



SEAMTBESS-Tbe fcdknriag 

aad or origjnd 
^^VOOtBeatoidy. 
!cd 390^194. 

36-rr-«-25 



5S.bNfty 



IKK' Aiffi LOSNG SO 

yoor a i ad ow s - we cma nop yxma 
great eaergy loss. Cd us at 482- 
5464!! 

59TFN 



ADDITIONS 

Remodeling RepUce- 
mcBt Windows. Any 
Type <rf laqxovcinatts. 

nccBHlBMNek 

R.H.BLACK ' 

3*7-7171 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for st^ 
for 

Hwr»%ACmtwm 
Buikkn 

SALES OFFICE 

mi 



CALL4M-m7 



~. 1. * X ^ 



mmf' 



P 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, August 4, 1982 



Leigh Memorial Looks At ** Wellness" 



The recent Parcourse opening provided"^ Wellness involves accepting responsibility 
Leigh Memorial with an opportunity to let the for one's own health status and therefore 
public know about their intention to develop making choices to engage in behaviors which 



an integrated wellness program. Parcourse, 
however, addresses just one aspect of wellness- 
physical fitness. 

A committee is looking into other aspects of 
wellness, both to define possible programs and 
design ways-^to market those programs. Bill 
Burcham and Sandra L. Colville head up the 
committee. The other members are: Jane 
Nohava, Martha Robertson, Karen Ward, and 
Fern Carr for marketing; and Shirley Fran- 
cisco, Dee Spivey, Fred Osgood, Ray Torres, 
Sue Dunkel, John Carlson and Gene Gramlich 
for program development. 



promote optimal well-being, in its physical, 
mental, emotional and spiritual aspect^: . 

Wellness is a way of life which centers 
around an individual's desire to aeate positive 
health (rather than to just seek treatment for 
disease) and thereby enhance his/her overall 
quality of life. 

Wellness has been defined as having five 
dimensions: Self-responsibility, stress 
management, physical fitness, nutritional 
awareness and enviromnental awareness. 
These serve as the initial basis for the program. 



"Nation-wide interest in fitness, nutrition, providing physical care to our patients," she 

and developing human potential developed in stated. 

the 1960's and 1970's. The integrations of Leigh Memorial is concerned about the high 

these concerns into the wellness concept is a costs and high total expenditures on "health 

more nscent trend but one to which we at care" as it affects patients and employees. 

Leigh feel we can contribute in a pro-active Many of the diseases which account for the 

way, as^ part of our overall social respon- greatest amount of morbidity and mortality in 
siblity,^' said Sandra Colville in a recent inter- 
view. . 

"As m hospital, we already have a 

philosoi|ify of management and patient care behaviors as a way of affecting health status 

that embodies the wellness concept. Our Leigh Memorial Hospital is becoming in- 

philosophy recognizes the necessity of good volved in wellness programs as a part of their 

health to the well-being of every individual, acceptance of their continuing role as a com- 

and a^^pusizes the importance of meeting munity health care provider and coordinator 

mentai,J&otionalandspiritualneedsaswella$ of health resources. ^ 



this country today have a behavioral com- 
ponent in their cause or course of treatment, 
and it makes good sense to try to affect these 



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Leigh Memorial Says '^ -Add Fitness To Your Future'' 



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There *s a new way to make fitness fun. It*s the Parcourse Circuit on the 
grounds of Leigh Memorial Hospital. This new exercise designed to give 
you a complete physical workout. 

How much does it cost? It*s absolutely free and no registration is required. 
The course is open to the public everyday during daylight hours. 

Each of the 18 stations is medidally designed for stretching, strengthening, 
or cardiovascular conditioning. In fact, the entire family can participate 
because each exercise has three fitness levels. 

Try Leigh Memorial's ne\y Parcourse and add fitness to your life 




AT- LEIGH MEMJRIAL 



Leigh Memorial Hospital • 830 Kempsville Road • Norfolk 

Near the Koger Es^Mtive Center 



"Man Running" 

Photo Credit: 

Eadwmrd Muy bridge 

mo- 1904 



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tm 



2953 VIRGINIA BEACH BOULEVARD 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

340-7975 



TOWER MALL 
PORTSMOUTH 
488-4467 



WARDS CORNER-NORFOLK 

(In Tracks Shopping Ctnter-Granby St.) 

588-6666 



The Legal Cainic off Stwart R. Gordon 



Volume 1. Number 1 



Published Quarterly 



The 

Legal CSinie 
Concept 

The Legal Clinic of Stuart R. Gordon is among 
the first of its Itind in the Eastern United States. In 
our society of high priced law firms and no cost 
legal aid programs, only the rich and the poor 
have ready access to lawyers. People in the 
largest sector of our society— the middle income 
—must either do without lawyers and give up 
their rights or, when lawyers cannot.be avoided, 
pay much more than they can afford. The Legal 
Clinic has, for the first time, adopted a common 
sense approach to providing high quality, low 
cost legal services. 

The Legal Clinic has copied much from 
medical clinics. It is a system of combining the 
efforts of attorneys, staff and paralegals. 

In much the same way as medical clinics Use 
nurses, the Legal Clinic iiMkes extensive use of 
par«legats, specially trained to^aaist the attorney 
on a case by case basis. However, they do not 
give legal advice and every client of the Legal 
Clinic wilt be individually counselled by an 
attorney. 

Carefully planned and detailed systems have 
been devised so that with the combined efforts of 
attorneys and paralegals, and the use of ad- 
vanced computer age technology, the Legal 
Clinic can operate with the utmost efficiency and 
give the highest quality services at substantially 
reduced pricM. 

The attorneys with the Clinic have 1>een 
practicing for many years and have extensive 
courtroom experience. The system utilized by the 
Clinic to handle routine matters gives the 
attorneys time to handle the more complex 
contested matters including criminal, contested 
divorces and civil trial. 

A special feature of The Legal Clinic is its low 
cost counseling service. Many problems can be 
resolved by an explanation of your rights, or by 
advice as to where to go and what to say to 
enforce your rights yourself. This initial consul- 
tation is $15.00 If this interview results in further 
arid imnmedjate legal sen^icro, then there is no 
charge for the initial interview. 

Recognizing that many people are unable to 
take off from work. The Legal Clinic has con- 
venient office hours t>eing open daily, in the 
evenings, and on Saturdays. The Legal Clinic has 
opened three officM in the Tidewater arra to be 
more available to those in need of services. The 
office are located at Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach; Tower Mall, Portsmouth, and 
Wards Corner, Norfolk. 



r 



.^ 



Law cannot stand aside 

fn>m ^e social dianges around it. 

—William J. Brennan, Jr. 



Left to rigfat: (bottom raw) 
Debbie Hogarth, PatU 
Keenahan, Ellen Tuiner, 
Eknma Rohl<^; (second 
row) Gwen Lovett, Donna 
Beig, Qerlece Blanton; 
(third row) Julia Hutdier- 
son, Ed Saigeant, Qyde 
Killer, (fourth row) Stuart 
Gordon, Stephen Test, 
Russell Robertson. 



Fhoto by Manoos 




Tour fWends In Lour 



(^onfUetiiigf Prineiples ^y Stephen 



Test 



IL 



J 



Just as in any pro- 
fessional occupation 
that carries responsi- 
bility, being a lawyer 
requires making deci- 
sions and judgment 
calls that are often dif- 
ficult. The most sensi- 
tive and complex of 
these usually involve 
the rights of your cli- 
ent, and the use of a 
technicality or "legal 
loophole" to protect 
those rights. It raises 
the ethical question 
whether a lawyer de- 
fends his client know- 
ing he is guilty. 

All lawyers receive 
training in this sensi- 
tive area of practice, 
and in addition there is 
a written "Code of Pro- 
fessional Responsibil- 
ity" that guides our 
actions. Nevertheless, 
a lawyer's own sensi- 
tivity and moral con- 
science will always 
color his decisions. 
Having rw:ei\^ my 
legal education in the 
"post-Watergate" pe- 
riod, when widespread 
public concern over 



legal ethics was good 
press, i have always 
agonized over how I 
would deal with the 
situation when my turn 
came. Although this 
incident was on a small 
scale, to the partici- 
pants it was real human 
drama. 

The defendant, my 
client, was accused of 
indecent exposure in 
the neighborhood 
where he lived. As it 
happens, there were a 
great number of chil- 
dren in the area. A 
group of indignant par- 
ents, concerned for 
their children, brought 
criminal charges 
against the man. but 
only after repeated 
warnings. My client, 
with a clean record and 
sterling reputation, 
professed his inno- 
cence. He claimed his 
neighbors were un- 
justly harassing him. 
When the time came 
for the trial, I was pre- 
pared with testimonials 
and witnesses to de- 
fend this man's liberty 



and reputation against 
his accusers, four 
adults and one police- 
man. Fortunately, the 
judge never heard the 
evidence. 

The novice police 
officer, anxious to do 
his duty, had hurriedly 
filled out the arrest 
warrant and failed to 
list the code section 
identifying the crime 
my client had commit- 
ted. "Motion to quash 
the summons," I alertly 
stated, anxious to vin- 
dicate my client. 'This 
is a clear violation of 
my client's right to due 
procoss since he has 
not been properly in- 
formed of exactly what 
charges he stands ac- 
cused." The judge 
agreed with me and 
dismissed the charges. 
The policeman was 
emt>arrassed.'The par- 
ents were infuriated. 
As I left the courtroom 
titey pointed at me and 
said, "How does it feel 
to know that you have 
allowed that man to 
walk free?" "Typical 



lawyer's trick," said 
another. I was even 
asked if I had children 
of my own. 

I never knew if the 
man was legally guilty, 
a crime' for which he 
could have gone to jail. 
But I know his accus- 
Ors thought he was, 
and I know their esti- 
mation of a judicial 
system that can allow a 
criminal to t>e free. 

Fortunately, some 
good may have result- 
ed. Next time, the po- 
liceman will be more 
diligent. The client, if 
he was legally inno- 
cent, was vindicated. If 
not, he stood before a 
crowded public court- 
room that came within 
seconds of hearing evi- 
dence that would have 
shattered his reputa- 
tion and branded him 
for life— a wry sober- 
ing experience. 

Once outside the 
courtroom the parents 
and I had a very frank 
discussion of what had 
happened. Underlying 
all of the exclusionary 
rules of evidence and 
due process require- 
Sm Page 3 



«£» 



Comer 

1. Is It a good Idea to get titi* iMuranc* wh*n you 
purchaM a homa? 

Yes! When a lawyer does a title search he is 
liable for any error if he is negligent. He is not 
an insurer. Therefore if there was a forgery in a 
deed or a f ai lure of one of the heirs of an estate 
to sign a deed, the lawyer would not be 
responsible. However, your litle would be 
defective. When you puchase title insurance 
the company insures you against both errors a 
lawyer may see but miss, and those which a 
lawyer^ would not be expected to find. The 
premium for the covergae is a one time charge 
and is a reasonable charge when you consider 
the value of your new home. 

2. Is there any way that a woman can get child 
support If her husband lives outside the state? 

Yes. In the past it was difficult to enforce the 
order of a court in one state if the party to pay 
the child support lived in another state. 
However, most states have enacted the Uni- 
form Reciprocal Enforcement Act which 
permits you to file in the Juvenile and Domes- 
tic Relations Court for support. This petition is 
then sent to the state where your husband 
resides. He is then brought before the court, 
and after receiving your petition and his 
financial status, the court will award you 
support which will be paid to you through the 
court where you filed the petition. 

3. What is a "^age earner plan" in banicruptcy? 

It is a method permitted under the Banicruptcy 
Act where a person with the approval of the 
court, deposits with the court a certain sum 
each month to pay all or a portion of his debts. 
Even if you are permitted to pay a portion of the 
debts, when you have paid the portion which 
the court has required, the remainder of the 
debts are discharged and you are not required 
to make any further payments. 

4. May my husband adopt my child from a previous 
marriage without my previous husbands consent? 

Yes. The law permits this if, in the courts 
opinion, it is in the best interests of the child. 
After filing a petition for adoption, the natural 
father is served with a copy, or, if his where- 
whereabouts is unknown, notice is satisfied by 
publishing a copy of the notice. The matter is 
referred to the Department of Social Service 
which investigates the matter and renders a 
written report to the court on the advisability of 
the adoption. If it is favorable, the court, in 
most instances, will approve the adoption. 

5. May an employee sue his employer if he Is injured 
by the employers negligence while on the Job? 

No. The only remedy an employee has is 
workmen's compensation, which reimburses 
the employee for medical expenses and a 
portion of his salary. An employee may sue a 
third person, who is not a fellow employee, or 
the employer, if he was injured as the result of 
the negligence of that person. 

6. it is a good idea for a business to incorporato? - 

Each case must be looked upon individually, 
but there are many advantages to having a 
corporation. A corporation has limited liability 
which prevents creditors of the corporation 
from suing stockholders. It also permits the 
tHJSiness to continue indefinitely since the 
death of a stockholder does not affect the 
corporation and the shares may be sold by one 
stockholder to another person without ending 
the corporation. 



A Tieur of Bankrstptesr by stuan r. Goidon 



Historians note, that a people at a particular 
moment in history are judged in part by the laws 
they enact or fall to enact and the effect this action 
or lack of it has on the less vocal and unfortunate 
citizens of that society. 

In most instances, the battle centers not upon the 
moral Issue but the economic one. The persons 
most affected and of which little or nothing is heard, 
are in large measure, victims of circumstances not 
of their own making. They are presented as faceless 
masses or cold statistics. 

The enactment of child labor laws; statutes 
requiring safe working conditions for the employed; 
a program of unemployment insurance for those 
unable to find employment; social programs for the 
elderly and the disabled are just some of the 
economic struggles which resulted in enlightened 
legislation which, if originally received in any 
context except economic, would have resulted in 
legislation long before their actual enactment. 

One such controversy which is shaping up is the 
debtor-creditor relationship. At one time in England 
and the early colonies, as incredible as It may seem, 
the failure to pay a debt resulted in imprisonment. 
The nineteenth and early twentieth century was 
marked by the lack of debt by the working class. The 
working man, who for the most part, lived from w^ek 
to week, with little or no available credit, did not 
participate in any real measure in the economic 
commelrce of the day. 



". . .the real values 

Upon which a 

meanitigful life can be 

fotinded are not 

for sale." 



Bankruptcy was available, but since debt was 
neither encouraged by the lending institutions or 
available to the great mass of working persons, 
bankruptcy was seldom utilized. When economic 
conditions were poor, the worker's life became 
more difficult and in some instances, intolerable, 
but having not been given the opportunity to 
accumulate debts when conditions were good, 
there was little advantage to bankruptcy, since there 
were no debts 1o reduce. 

All this changed wheri, after World War II, we 
entered the age of consumption on a scale as never 
before in history, introduced to every product 
imaginable, from a new home to a new electric can 
opener, the age of Utopia had finally arrived. No 
longer did we have to save for tomorrow when we 
were able to purchase what we wanted today and 
pay for it some time in the future. 

The art of communication t>ecame the indis- 
pensable tool of industry offering through news- 
paper, television and radio those products we 
needed,— and 



order to meet the monthly payments incurred while 
partaking of the age of consumerism. 

Credit cards were given without request; consoli- 
dation loans made to reduce monthly payments— 4 
only to Incur more debt; second mortgages were 
obtained upon the hope that the home would 
Increase In value; and the length of automobile 
loans were extended beyond the life of the vehicle. ^ 

All systems appeared to be functioning properly 
and all seemed well in the land. Occasionally a short 
period of economic difficulty would provide a few 
anxious moments but soon all was well again. 

However, not since the great depression have all 
the economic indicator been so bleak' With the 
downturn of economic activity also comes the loss 
of employment, reduction of hours worked, or the 
elimination of the second job. Since the financial 
circumstances of the average family was so ~ 
delicately balanced, the smallest disruption created 
economic crisis. 

My office has experienced a substantial increase 
in the number of bankruptcies over the last year. 
Who is at fault? 

Some suggest that the increase is due to lawyers . 
advertising. For most of those that I see. it is a 
difficult decision, which is the result of many hours 
of soul-searching. All the advertising in the world 
would not encourage persons to file bankruptcy 
except as a last desperate act to maintain some 
family cohesion. 

Others suggest it is the bankruptcy act itself 
which simplifies the procedure and gives the 
bankrupt substantially more than a "fresh start". A 1 
person, while eliminating his debts, also jeopardizes 
his assets. 

Except for certain basic necessities, such as 
eating utensils and select items of furniture, a 
person may only exempt from the creditors $5000 1: 
worth of items. This is hardly the incentive which , 
would encourage a family to file bani(ruptcy except ) 
in the most difficult of circumstances. 

The culprits, if there are any. is a society which 
encourages, with every device possible, the 
purchase of meaningless, unnecessary, superficial 
items with monies not yet earned. 

It is an educational system which fails to instill a 
value system in which thrift and conservation is 
more important than obtaining glittering, dispen- 
sable possessions. It is an educational system 
which does not teach even the most basic economic 
principle that there is no free ride in life. 

It is a government which can embark upon 
economic policy designed to cause massive 
unemployment and which can callously read the 
unemployment figures as if they do not represent 
individual families who are suffering the fears and 
uncertainties which are occasioned by unemploy- 
ment. 

It is the lending institutions which for years 
encouraged the use of credit beyond ail normal 
bounds and which now are encouraging thrift and 
advertising that bankruptcy is bad for your credit 
rating. 
It is industry which Is only concerned .with 



It is the spirit 

and not the form of law 

that Iceeps Justice aAve. 

Chief Justice Eari Wiinren 



those we did not need, but only 
appeared to need. In order to satisfy some moroen- Increased profits, expanding markets and growth at 
tary desire, a craving for s^-identification or some any cost. 

other equally useless purpose. A'^ finally. It Is the Incttvldual, the consumer, who 

The one necessary ingredient to accomplish both ^^ adopted a misplaced value system which seeks 
the insatiable appetite of industry and the consumer snat materialism In the hope of obtaining greater 
was credit. The financial Institutions* seeing the satisfaction and contentment— only to realize that 
opportunity for unbridled growth for their industry, i* only achieves momentary happiness, and tha 
stepped forward providing the most liberal and ^^ real values upon which a meaningful life can be 
creative credit plans yet conceived. Almost any- founded are not for sale. 

thing could be purchased with "no money down and History will acknowledge that our laws granted 
monthly payments". Consumption was presented persons deeply in debt a second opportunity 
as an entmement. which each citizen not only had a thereby placing a greater value on the individual 
right, but an obligation to demand. Men took second ^^ "PO" property. Sadly, however, history will 
jobs and the woman of the family went to work In ^»o *P^^ of this time, when so many \yere so lost. 

WiUJcnlca dhmnx Ertc? 
«m Eric dMi^ his oamc 
to Gomtiicjr? 
...aad adopt AUcta? 

LcgrilVobtems? 

Come Bee 

YOUR FRIENDS IN lAW 

at 

Hk Legal CStalc 

of 
Sbiait R Gofdoa 




v.. 



Attoniey of 
tlteNoirtli 

Stuart R. Gordon arrived in the city of Virginia 
Beach In Septemt>er of 1975 with his family— his 
wife, Linda, his son Seth, two daughters Amy and 
Jessica, two dogs and two cats. 

After practicing law for fifteen years, Stuart, 
with Unda's support, had decided that the quality 
of life in their New York suburb was different from 
the direction in which they wished to grow. 
Therefore, they had pacited up, sold their home 
and major belongings, and travelled to the coast 
of Spain where they settled into a Spanish villa 
overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. For two 
years they travelled, relaxed and re-evaluated 
what they wanted out of life, finally deciding that 
they wished to live in a small forward growing 
community in a warmer climate. They felt that the 
pace of life had been too fast in New York and yet 
they wished something a little more active than 
the sleepy Spanish village on the Costa del Sol. 
After several months of discussion over various 
city brochures they made a short trip to Virginia 
Beach and decided that it seemed to fit the bill! 

Within a few weeks of arriving Stuart joined a 
Norfolk law firm, Linda joined a realty firm and the 
three children were enrolled in school. 

Virginia Beach proved to be a very happy 
choice for the Gordons. Within a short time they 
found friends and new interests in their adopted 
community. One of their major interests became 
the growing Virginia Beach S.P.C.A. Being 
animal lovers, they soon became active on its 
Board of Directors. 

One of the acquaintances that the Gordons 
made was Wade Bettis, an attorney who opened 
the first Legal Clinic in Virginia Beach, and was 
interviewed extensively in the media. There was a 
recent Supreme Qourt ruling that attorneys were 
allowed to advertise. The Clinic concept was 
based on advertising to bring in a volume of 
clients who would be seen by lawyers, but the 
legal paperwork would be done in a more 
computerized fashion, thereby allowing the 
cutting of fees for routine legal services. 

As an attorney working for a traditional law 
firm, Stuart discussed the clinic idea with Linda 
and felt that it was indeed a necessity for the 
future, as legal fees, like other professional costs, 
were beginning to sky rocket. 

And so it was with little hesitation that Stuart 
Gordon took over the Legal Clinic in September 
of 1977, when only a few months after its 
inception the Bettises decided that they wished to 
return to their native Oregon. 

From its embryonic stage, the Legal Clinic 
started to grow steadily when the former Com- 
monwealth Attorney of Virginia Beach decided to 
test an ancient Virginia law which made it illegal 
to »Jvertise for divorces or wills. 

Suddenly Stuart Gordon found himself in- 
dicted on an old law that if upheld would mean 
disbarment and loss of his livelihood. 

The putMic and legal response was immediate 




and supportive. All legal opinion, including that 
of the State Attorney General was that the old law 
was unconstitutional and the indictment was ill- 
conceived. After several weeks, it was brought to 
court and the judge dismissed it with a severe 
admonishment to the Virginia Beach Common- 
wealth Attorney, (l-le has since t)een defeated for 
re-election.) 

The publicity during the indictment brought to 
the attention of the community the concept of 
lower costs for routine legal services and The 
Legal Clinic started to grow. 

In the years that followed, Stuart Gordon found 
himself taking in a partner in order to share the 
responsibilities, and opening two new of^ces, 
one in Wards Corner and one in Tower Mall in 
Portsmouth. . 

During these years he also discovered the need 
for relaxation very vital. Driving out to Pungo one 
day, and seeing the open spaces and natural 
beauty, the Gordons decided to buy a farm. This 
past November they moved into the home that 
they feel will completely satisfy their needs, a 
passive solar home with land for a huge garden 
and future horses. 

~ In the meantime, Stuart found the philosophies 
of he and his partner totally different and he again 
has sole proprietorship and responsibility for the 
three offices. 

In addition, in the past year he has been in the 
forefront of a fight to have a low cost animal care 
clinic at the S.P.C.A. As president of the S.P.C.A. 
and one of the initiators of the Clinic, it has been 
of vital concern to him that it remain open to serve 
the public. 

Today, the Gordons live happily on their farm in 
Pungo. eagerly awaiting their first summer 
garden crop. Their son Seth attends Old Do- 
minion University, their daughter Amy is a junior 
at Keiiarn (High School and both also work after 
school at The Legal Clinic. Jessica is in fifth grade 
at Friends School. The Gordons still have two 
dogs and two cats. 

When Stuart Gordon goes home at night afte; 

See Gmrdiom, page 4 



Test Your 
Legal Kiiowledge 

1. The "Miranda Rule" requires a 

a. creditor to hold money in escrow 

b. police officer to read a defendant his rights 

c. court to exclude hearsay evidence 



2. The phrase "caveat emptor" means 

a. buyer beware 

b. sailor beware 

c. beware of dog 



3. A person may receive a divorce in Virginia|for 
which one of the following reasons: ' 

a. incompatabiity ^ ' ; 

b. desertion 

c. living separately for three (3) months 

4. A felony is a crime punishable by 

a. imprisonment for more than one (1) year 

b. imprisionment for less than one (1) year 

c. exile from the state 

5. A person who files bankruptcy may not file 
bankruptcy again for 

a. 3 years 

b. 6 years 

c. ever 



/ 



6. The United States Constitution guarantees the 

a. right to work 
= j b. right to equal protection under the law 
c. right to have poitical parties 

7. A person who is charged with a crime is indicted 
by a 

a. Grand Jury - v 

b. Circuit Court Judge ' 

c. Commonwealth Attorney 

8. The Justices of the Supreme Court of the United 
States are 

a. elected every 10 years 

b. appointed for life 

0. appointed by the United States Senate for 
15 years 

9. An agreement for the sale of real estate must 

a. be in writing 

b. be notarized 

c. be witnessed by at least two persons 

10. The bill of rights is 

a. the first ten amendments of the United 
States Constitution 

b. the program started by President Truman 
after World War II 

c. the Monroe Doctrine 

B-Ol. '8-6 

:q-8 '.9-1 :q-g :q-s '.v-p '.q-£ le-g :q-i. tzmo o\ sjsmsuv 



ments of law that are 
used, and sometimes 
twisted to protect a 
defendant, ttiera are 
basic freedonns, appli- 
cable to all dtizens, 
that we chM-lsh and 
seek to protocL Spe- 
cifically— Thai you an 
hmooeiit untfi proven 
gui^ that an accused 
shall not be tried in the 
prew, and shall be free 
from lllegtf search, and 
have the right to a law- 
yer. Lately public opin- 
ion has caltod for limit- 
ing the safeguards of 
defeiKlwif s rights in an 
effort to put more crim- 
inals in prison, and as a 
result some of the land- 
mark liberal Supreme 
Court deci8i<Hts of the 



Warren Court are being 
undermined. 

Nevertheless, there 
is a basic tenet, ex- 
pressed by one Su- 
preme Court Justice, 
to which all people 
everywhere should ad- 
hwe. In a society that 
prizea individual liberty 
and freedom, it is far 
better to allow a crimi- 
nal to go free Vtwn to 
unjustly imprison an 
innocent man. 

These safeguards 
are there for the benefit 
of all citizens. Would 
you want your lawyer 
to use them for your 
benefit? If ^u are not 
sure, just imagine 
yourself, an innocent 
man accused of a 
crime. 



offtlie 
Nondi 

Cleriece Blanton is 
employed t>y The Legal 
Clinic of Stuart R. Gor- 
don as the real estate 
secretary, handling 
new loans, assump' 
tions, construction 
loans and owner- 
flnanced transactions. 
She has worked ^a a 
legal secretary, primar- 
ily in the real estate 
ar^i. for approximately 
ten years. 

She enjoys doing 
real estate closings be- 
cause she likes dealing 
directly with the cli- 
ento. When asked why 




she likes the client con- 
tact, ^e stetes, "Buy- 
ing a home is gerteraiiy 
a happy occasion for 
people and I enjoy talk- 
ing to the folks and 
sharing in their excite-, 
ment and anticipation. 
Often, a buyer is anx- 
ious or concerned 
about closing costs, 
title problems, and 
other related matters. 



especially if it is a first 
home. I get a feeling of 
satisfaction if I can an- 
swer some of their 
questions. It helps to 
put their minds at ease 
and alleviate some of 
their worries so that 
they can begin to look 
forward to the excite- 
ment of moving into 
their new home." 

A Norfolk native. Ms. 
Blanton owns a triplex 
apartment in the Co- 
lonial Place area of 
Norfolk, residing there 
with her two dogs and 
three cats. "Ifs a good 
thing that I'm the land- 
lady, because I don't 
know too many land- 
lords who would let me 
keep that menagerie in 
an apartment," she 
says. 



Reading and travel- 
ing are favorite pas- 
times. During the past 
year she has visited 
Kentucky, West Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee, New 
York, Pennsylvania 
and Canada. She and a 
friend hope to visit the 
World's Fair in Tennes- 
see this summer. 



Where 

law ends, 

tyranny 

b^ins. 

— wSliam 

Pitt, 

1770 



L-iAis _iaia. ^=^^M 



i 



Lawyer Finds 
A ff^endly Image 

Stuart R. Gordon was a lawyer with a problem. 
He wanted an image to promote his legal clinic, 
and he wanted the kind of image that the general 
public would rememlier. 

Gordon took his problem to Sharon Bailey, of 
Nebula, Inc., a local advertising firm. 

"We agree that a definite emphasis was needed 
on the fact that your lawyer is your friend," Ms. 
Bailey explained recently. "Too many people are 
afraid to take their legal difficulties to a lawyer," 
she n^d. "It's an unjustified fear." 

That needed emphasis was successfully met 
with a deceptively simple phrase, "YOUR 
FRIENDS IN LAW." Now came the important 
step, conveying that message to the public. 

"Soap operas are really hot these days," Ms. 
Bailey pointed out. "Soap characters have the 
same problems as everyone, and since this was to 
be a continuing concept, that seemed the ideal 
way to go." Indeed it was. 

With the help of some familiar local person- 
alities "Your Friends In Law" has become one of 
the most entertaining series of commercials to 
grace the local airwaves in recent memory. 

"Response to the campaign has been most 
gratifying," said Ms. Bailey. "People are quickly 
picking up on the ongoing story, and best of all, 
the message is getting through." And it reflects in 
increased business for The Legal Clinic of Stuart 
R. Gordon. 

Gordon 

long, tiring day at The L^gal Clinic, he takes out 
his tractor and plows his garden, or takes a walk 
with Linda to Back Bay. or just stands outside 
looking at the stars that seem to shine so brightly 
in Pungo and he feels blessed. He works hard but 
he is doing something of value for his fellow man 
during the day, and on days off and at night he 
can find peace by being close to Nature. 



YOUR 
FRIENDS 

IN LAW 

5 Experienced Attorneys providing quick 
efficient indivkJual attention! 

3 LOCATIONS! 

2953 Va. Beach Blyd.,-Va. Beach 

340-7975 

Tower Malt-Portsmouth 

488-4467 

Wards Comer-NortotK 
(in Tracks Shopping Canter-Qr8r4>y St.) 

588-6666 

• DIVORCE Unconle»l«a $1 75 

• LEGAL SEPARATION AGREEMENT $100 

• BANKRUPTCY p«««" "-."Ou- ,^„„ 

or oiagt Jtvnet plan (Oitpter 13) t $200 

• SIMPLE WILLS $35 

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• REAL ESTATE CLOSINGS 

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• PERSONAL INJURY-ACCIDENTS 

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• ADOPTIONS $150 

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• CORPORATIONS $175 

AU. LEGAL SERVICtS AVAILABtE INCLUDING 

NAME CHANGE-JUVENILE-COURT MARTIAL 

ABOVE FEES DO NOT INCLUDE COURT COSTS 

OR CONTESTS) CASES 

OPEN DAILY 
EVENINGS & SATURDAYS 

The Legal Clinic 
of 

Stuart R. Gordon 



Divoree As Drama 
InHi^iiiia 



by Qydc G. KlUcr 



This is the first of a 
series of non-scholar- 
ly, first-person obser- 
vations and compari- 
sons of divorce in Vir- 
ginia, as actually ap- 
plied: 

Having practiced law 
in Florida and various 
Federal courts for sev- 
eral years prior to mov- 
ing to Virginia in 1976, 
the first ttiing that I 
observed about di- 
vorce as a legal/social 
phenomenon in the 
Old Dominion was that 
it took so ever-lasting 
longi In Florida, I once 
obtained three divor- 
ces for one client in a 
single year, Florida be- 
ing a true "no-fault" 
state with no waiting 
requirement (more 
about the differences 
in later articles). 

As a direct result of 
the related facts that 
Virginia favors con- 
siderations of whose 
"fault" the failure of the 
marriage is and the 
requirement that no 
final decree ending the 
marriage and in some 
cases the agony, can 
be entered for 12 full 
months after the physi- 
cal separation of the 
parties, I believe agreat 
deal of social and emo- 
tional harm Is perpe- 
trated on the citizenry. 
The emotional bonds 
of two people for each 
other are not always 
severed when one of 
them moves out. Prop- 
erty, desire for income, 
children, negative feel- 
ings or desires for re- 
venge or dominance In 
most cases continue to 
exist and tie the parties 
together at least for a 
while. Like as not, 
these feelings and re- 
actions iare in some 
degree more or less 
negative ones and pre- 
vent a serene and or- 
derly "closing out" of 
the relationship. Most 
lawyers agree that as 
long as court actions 
are pending, even 
though low-key, there 
still exists emotional 
and mental bonds l)e- 
tween the parties. 

Virginia, as a society, 
says this one year is 
neectod to impede di- 
vorces as a social "evil" 
and to support mar- 
riage, but then once 
the action tiegins in 
Court, forbids people 
to attempt reconcili- 
ation under penalty of 
losing all grounds for 
divorce, including the 
one year separation. 
This, It seems to me to 
have an effect contrary 
to the one intended. 



Emotions can still 
flame during the phys- 
ical separation while 
the law fiddles. For ex- 
ample, In a one-month 
period just after I re- 
turned to the Court- 
room arena-here In Vir- 
ginia, I noted some 
eight deaths, including 
a double murder/sui- 
cide wherein the re- 
ported accounts re- 
ferred to separated or 
estranged spouses. 

A typical example 
was where a drunken 
husband was shot and 
killed by his wife when 
he attempted to break 
into the apartment 
where she and her male 
friend were staying. 
Obviously, for the de- 
ceased husband, the 
memory was lingering 
on through the legal 
waiting period. 

Due to the long 
wait, frequently one 
party will call, harass, 
continuously contact, 
or threaten with vio- 
lence, loss of funds or 
loss of contact with 
children, the other 
party in order to 
achieve some sort of 
revenge or injury to the 
other spouse. This of- 
ten acts as a catalyst 
for the spouses to beat 
or attack each other, 
break into homes or 
cars, emotionally dam- 
age their children (of- 
ten irreparably), and 
generally, in the name 
of "fault-finding," sow 
hate and discontent, 
saying all the while, "I 
have the right to do 
this; after all, we're still 
legally married." 

Even when the 
spouses part neutrally, 
there are problems. For 
example, a woman or a 
fiancee t>ecomes preg- 
nant while living with a 
person waiting for a 
divorce to become fi- 
nal. This causes social 
damage to the parties, 
ugly gossip or cheap- 
ening of the new love 
affair, the legal inability 
of the new couple to 
wed, thus legitimizing 
the child and making 
clear its lines of sup- 
port other than the 
public treasury. Per- 
haps the seeds of an- 
ger, frustration and 
self-loathing are plant- 
ed to ripen later in an- 
other divorce. 

It seems to me a bet- 
ter way is to recognize 
the simple basic hu- 
man fact that, like a 
tango, it takes two 
people to cooperate 
and make a relation- 
ship work. On the legal 
scene, this would mean 



that n6 sciparation time 
periods would be re- 
quired when the parties 
agree or one party in- 
sists, for whatever rea- 
son, that the marriage 
is over and that absent 
proof for support pur- 
poses, no grounds 
(specific "bad" acts) by 
one side or the other is 
proven. 

The present legal sit- 
uation is such that 
either party can adopt 
melodramatic roles of 
outraged husband, 
wounded wife, batter- 
ed spouse, supporter 
of the household, up- 
lifter of moral truth. 



"fair and reasonable, 
but look at the crazy 
I'm stuck with," "I'd 
forgive him/her if only 
he/she would admit I'm 
right and fair and he/ 
she is wrong and self- 
ish." etc., etc. 

Certainly, as drama, 
a non-waiting divorce 
action is more dull, but 
the quicker the legal 
bonds are severed, the 
faster and more peace- 
fully (without 12 
months of aggravating 
conduct one has no 
control over), the par- 
ties can go on about 
their lives and. other 
business. 



4 



TowWUl 

ty Ed Saigednt 

Many people assume that a will drawn up a 
number of years ago is sufficient to ensure that 
their property will be distributed acording to their 
desires. However, that is not always true. 

A will is an important legal document that 
allows you to determine how your property 
(estate) is to be distributed upon your death. If a 
person dies without a will, the property will be 
distributed according to the plan set up by the 

State Law. 

A common misconception is that if you die. all 
of your property will go to your surviving spouse. 
However, if you have any children, according to 
the laws of Virginia, two-thirds of your estate will 
go to the children, leaving only one-third for the 
surviving spouse. This situation can be easily 
remedied by having a will. 

If you do have a will, it should be reviewed 
periodically to ensure that it still reflects your 
desires. Certain occurrences may require the 
drafting of a new will in order to accomplish the 
distribution of your property according to your 
wishes. For example, the birth of a new child, 
marriage, divorce or moving to a different state 
are events which would necessitate revision of a 
will. Every state has different laws regarding wills. 
Therefore. If you want to make sure your will 
reflects your wishes. It is important that you have 
your wilJ reviewed by an attorney In the state In 
which you reside. 

One problem which can occut when a will was 
drafted more than a few years ago or In another 
state, is the inability to locate the witnesses. 

In order to probate (prove the validity) of a will, 
the law requires at least one of the witnesses be 
located in order to verify the validity of the will, 
unless a self-proving affidavit is attached to the 

will. 

In 1972. Virginia passed a law authorizing the 
use of a self-proving affidavit to replace the 
requirement that a witness must testify as to the 
validity of the will. The self-proving affidavit Is a 
notarized statement stating that all the legal 
requirements for a valid will have been satisfied. 

If there is not self-proving affidavit and one of 
the witnesses cannot be located, the Court will 
not allow the will to be probated. In such a 
situation, the result is the same a» if that person 
never had a will. This problem arises frequently In 
the Tidewater area due to the lai^ number of 
transient people. In one particular caw, the wWe 
of a Navy man had her will drawn up at the legal 
office of a Naval base In Annapolis. Upon her 
death In 1981. a search was made in order to 
locate at least one of the wltnwses. Due to the 
trensienM of the personnel In the Navy legal 
office, the search was fruitless, even with the 
assistance of ttie Navy. The result: the local Court 
would not accept the will and her property was 
distrUmMd «M»rding to the state's plan and not 
her dmlr^. 

Therefore, It is important that you review your 
will to see If there is a self-proving affidavit 
attached. Without that instrument, your will may 
be useless. 



m 



«MI 



-^Pf-fw- 



I -w* 



26 946475 g3/n/84 ^* 
VIRGINIA 5TAT£ UieRARY 
SERIALS StCTION 
iRICHMQNU VA 23ii9 



Tne Virginia Beacn ^!jwn 



Sm Yf<ur, No. 32, Vh^aWBtadi, V«. 





lA 



Minister at (Im Vir^nla Bndt Viifted Metiwdht Ckiveli, (L tn It) ntt, Robert CofieM, Dr. Eugene 
Wooiridgc, and Wlltt«m Araaer. 



Virginia Beach Un ited Methomsi 

Preaching God's Love 
On the SizzUn' Strin 



By Greg Goldfarb 

SuD Editor 
"It's a challenge," admits Virgiiu* «i. 
Methodist Church Associate Minister Roben 
Cofield, regarding maintaining a ministry only 
twp blocks from the ocean c" ^'-"-'^'^ n.^^v.'* 
staneiii 



have hetv 
here, there 

with »« th<^V'.l 



must be dealt 




18th Stn?-' 

meraberi. 

Methodi? 



locai 
Letti 
past 



•-i.fV\ ¥\K% 



ni. 



cc 

s. 
God 

rUn&l^^.^/--, -" 

"During t- 
seetdng assis 
town; young 
ioc^ttg for V 
Cofjeidsaid. 
local one-r>f; 
grocerici. aU 

Sometimes we can help. so. 

The church has a standing 
10 wliich 

unlbrtunaie ones wno aie lu uhxh -)v':'^. »T\;tion 
collections arc received monthly, i'"i?}lv totaling 
$30() and $400, Us' 

leporii, the church '' "'* 

those in sertous neet 
«all pqr'< 
iiiij, iiyi uws proviflii»i« > 
time," Cofield said, "Y 
provide reenforc 
' out a h;- 
ample 



ail) 



I tA US presei 

* <915. Mrs. 

, rs did this 

bcr of the 

>^!ii*ch. A 

•jctuary 

.nd li the oniy 

.. .horch building. 

b^inntngs, it has 






rich the 66,500 

niilion. But it 

uioitionai adjacent 

expansion were 

,)r S52,500; two 

>n IS0» tor >iwi,5uu; one mtffe in 

nnn and in 1974 for S62,500. No 

vailable for the ia.st three 

f 23 classroons*. a 

vship hall, librwy, 

jiuces- A new 9,000 

ttm? btjilt to aocorapany 



exi 



. tt\M\ji, l-ilV 



itid CAp&ni> 



offlc- 

It's a fi; 
deter"*' 



.ft oeiwcer; 
•vhHc, mcT. 



Ivanhoe Cries 



Judge Upholds Zoning Ordinance 






were not made 

i^arly contribut- 

° sample, the 

pork in its 

; so for seven 

;ials say, goes 

iut, the church 

he parking 

.unisters, living 
sed by the 
The 1966 
;9,000. 
cb may be 
) members; 
andinlW2, 



nuMhs, 
chuKA. 

■ of the 
the. 
1e1d 






ye«r 
belte 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Suff Writer 

A Qrcuit Court Edge's 
ruling last week to shut 
down the Ivanhoe Hotel's 
outdoor cafe has left the 
losing party's attorney cr- 
ying "unfBdr." The deci- 
sion has also optntdi up a 
can of wcM'ms regarding 
the liiture of other patio 
-restaurants along the boa- 
rdwalk. 

Judge Bernard Barrow 
ruled the Ivanhoe 's opera- 
tion vidated city zoning 
ordinance 711.B which 
states a restaurant along 
the oceanfrcxit cannot be 
'visible beyoid the proper- 
ty upon which it is built. 
'Owners for the Ivanhoe 
sued the city last year, 
saying the ordinance was 
unc<nistitutional and too 
vague. 

Further, the Ivanhoe 
contended the city was 
discriminating against the 
hotel because a survey 
bad found that 47 d the 09 
businesses located along 
the boardwalk were in 
violation of the 1973 ordi- 
liance. Barrow upheld the 
Ivanhoe 's claims, calling 
the ordinance unconstitu- 
tional, and gave Qty Cou- 
ncil 90 days to draft a new 
i; zoning (X'dinance. 

The city rewrote the 
I ordinance, and it was put 
effect in Nov., 19tl. 



Greenwood Hotel, he sa- 
id, will appear August 19. 
Joseph Lyle, who repre- 
seiited the Ivanhoe, said 
his client has been treated 
unfairly by the city. 
"There is no question 
they have singled out the 
Ivainhoe because ctf bad 
blood which exists bet- 
ween some city officials 
and the Ivanhoe." 

Lyle said Barrow's 
decision was "prefectly 
legal," but the lawyer 
argued that the Ivanhoe's 
restaurant was in 
operation before the or- 
dinance was revised and 
thus qualifies as a legal, 
non-conforming use. 
Barrow ruled, however, 
the Ivanhoe's was not a 
legal, non-conforming use 
because the patio was built 
without a proper building 
permit and did not 
provide parking for ad- 
ditional patronage the 

. facility would create. 

Lyle explained that the 
Ivanhoe's owners were 
unable to obtain such a 

. permit. "It was a Catch- 
22," he said. "'We knew 
the city wouldn't issue us 
a permit until we were in 
compliance with the dd 
o-dinnacx. And, we woul- 
dn't be in compliance with 
the ordinance until we had 
the permit. So, we were 
just chasing our own ta- 
il*' 



cted of assaulting a patr- 
oa. That case did not 
influence the judge's dec- 
is icm on the zoning ordin- 
ance, Lyle said. However, 
the attorney claimed the 
Ivanhoe's reputation led 
to it being the first hotel 
singled out under the 
revised ordinance. 

"The lyanhoe's real 
problem is not the noise it 
generates, but its locati- 
on," Lyle said. "It is 
right there where the toll 
road hits Atlantic Avenue 



and every bum and troub- 
le-maker in town seems to 
congregate there. If you 
didn't know better, you'd 
think the Ivanhoe created 
that element." 
> Lyle said his client wo- 
uld not appeal Barrow's 
decision to the state supr- 
eme court because the 
process "could take any- 
where from six months to 
two years. The season to 
make money is now, so 

(See ORDINANCE, Page 13) 



he first test of the maintains a bad reputat- 



was the first test o^ the 
new OTdinance. Several 
other hotels are sliated to 
appear in court for similar 
alleged vidatiom, fu:cord- 
ing to Assistant Gty Atto- 
rney R. J. Nutter. The 



maStains a~5iirreputat 
ion with Qty Council be- 
cause of several weU-pub- 
licized incidents, includ- 
ing a case last year in 
which one of the restaur- 
ant's bouncers was cojvi- 




Dogs ' Rights ! 



Dog Owners Concerned Over Leash Law 



ByLeeCahiU 
ISun Rqjortcr 

It wasn't exactly a "Born Free" chorus, but dog 
owners let it be known that their pets need a certain 
amwini of freedom which a leash law, as pr<HX)sed, 
doesn't permit. 

Etog owners are wiping to go along wtth a leash law 
but cmly if the Qty of Tirginia Beach will specify certain 



places where the dogs can romp without rest- 
raints at specified times. . Beaches, parks and school 
grounds before and after the hours they are used by the 
regular clientele would be fine. 

Qty Council Monday afternoon deferred action on 
the leash law proposed by the Qtizen's Committee 
Studying Animal Contrd Laws until Sept. 13 to give 
(See Dog, Page 8) 



Chamber Named Business Resource 



The Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce 
has been named as a 
Small Business Resource 
Center by the Small Busi- 
ness Administration. 

M. Hawley Smith, dis- 
trict directCM- for the SBA 
OfBiX in Richmond, and 
Chamber President Itob- 
ert. W. Berry, Jr. were oa 
hand for the signing of the 
agreement which pledged 
the mutual coc^eration of 
the Virginia Beach Chain- 
ber and the SBA in jwovi- 
ding infcHtnation and assi- 
stance to small business 
owners and maiuigers. 

.Also on hand for tb/t 
oixasion were Jim Krie* 
ger, chairman of the 
Oiamber's Small Busto- 
ess Ciroraittee, awl Bill 
ft-itchard, chairman of iht 
local Servi<x Corps of 
Retired Executives chi^)- 
ter. 

Among the prc^rams 
estabtoted by the agne- 
^nt are: a SnuOl Busi- 
i»ss library, (insisting of 
the SBA's most reqiKSted 
•■idll business numage- 
i^nt pubUcations; a ixm- 



mitment to a series of 
small business manage- 
ment seminars, the first of 
which will be held August 
18; and the appointment 
of Chamber members to 
the statewide Small Bus- 
iness Adviswy QMincil, 
which will meet from time 



to time to make recomm- 
endations on matters affe- 
cting small business. 

Also as part of the 
agreement, the local Ser- 
vice Corps of Retired Exe- 
cutives chapter (SCORE) 
will offer management 
advisory services to exist- 



ing and prospective busi- 
ness owners, at the Virgi- 
nia Beach Chamber office 
starting in September. 
SCORE counselors will be 
available the first and 
third Thursdays of each 
month at the Chamber 
office. 




Chamber 



Celebrating the Virginia Beach Chambe^^of Comme- 
rece's recent hOTor (teft to r^ht) are: Wenton M. 
Pritchard, James R. Krieger, M. Hawley Smith; and 
Robert W. Berry Jr. 



2 Virginui Beach Sun, August 11, 1M2 

Sun Commentary 



I 



Editorials 



A Nasty Act 



Rape. It's a nasty act. Utter the word 
aloud, and it even sounds vulfar. 

In 1981, there were 93 rapes in Virginia 
Beach. 189 in Norfolk, and 195 in Rich- 
mond. In those three cities alone, almost 
500 women were reported to have been 
raped. No telling how many rapes went 
unreported. 

Who is to blame for the rapes? Ob- 
viously, the assailants. But what is it 
about today's society that causes a man, 
or a woman to inflict their vile desires on 
other unreceptive human beings? 

First of all, there is too much freely 
flowing booze and illicit drugs, and too 
few values and scruples. Secondly, many 
Americans have too much time in their 
Hands; idle time which is used to plot the 
personal and moral demise of unsuspec- 
ting victims. And third, today's liberated 
sexual attitudes on behalf of many men 
and women have only served to confuse 
and frustrate those people with less than 
adequate self concepts. 



To deter rapes, women have blown 
whistles, studied karate, bought big dogs, 
carried Mace and Hngernail files, and 
prayed. They have pushed for increased 
street lighting, and stiffer penalties for 
convicted rapists. 

But still, unpredictably, unrelentlessly, 
the rapes continue. 

Thanks to the efforts and understan- 
ding of Ray and Yvette Iglecia, those who 
have fallen victim to rape may now be 
professionally cared for and comforted, 
not disgraced or humiliated for being the 
objectof an outraged aggressor's fury. 

The best we can hope for is a call for 
even harsher penalties for convicted 
rapists. But rape, like many crimes, is a 
crime of opportunity. And as long as 
women, knowingly or unknowingly, 
allow an opportunity arise, or places her- 
self in a compromising circumstance, un- 
fortunately, somewhere there is a men- 
tally sick male, not a man, who will take 
advantage of the situation. - G. D. G. 



Peace and Quiet 



If peace and quiet are what you seek, 
unfortunately you would be better served 
to vacation elsewhere ~ perhaps in Antar- 
ctica. But, if you come to the beach, you 
should expect that there will be a little 
traffic, music and a few kids. 

Still, to hear some of the hotel owners 
in this town tell it, guests in their 
establishments are complaining thai 
VJ^^gfitfaBeoeii^ too mrtsrtdr them. So, 

the proprietors of these hospitality houses 
are doing something about it: they are 
pressuring City Council to somehow do 
away with the noise. Noise, which some 
people pay good money for and call 
"good times." 

In recent weeks, two rather well- 
publicized cases of this nature have sur- 
faced, calling into question the nature of 
Virginia Beach's zoning ordinances. Fir- 
st, there was the time a hotel owner tried 
to put the clami^ on the music at Ocean 
Eddie's Tropical Bar. Then, last week, a 
Circuit Court judge ruled that the 
Ivanhoe Hotel was in violation of city law 
by operating an outdoor cafe. As in the 
Ck:ean Eddie debate, the chief complaint 



was noise. 



The keyword here is inconsistency. 
Why is it that the Ivanhoe must close in its 
walls, yet McDonald's and Dairy Queen 
can open up right onto the beach? And, 
why is that music can blast from the Pep^ 
permint Beach Club, but must be silenced 
at Ocean Eddie's? -i ,. ^;a< 

This all stems back to the innkeepers 
and the restauranteurs being unalbcto eo<^' 
exist in Virginia Beach. Each is depen- 
dent upon the other, but both would 
prefer that the other butt out. Compoun- 
ding all this are the city's zoning ordinan- 
ces, which are vague. Further, the 1981 
ordinance in question was literally too lit- 
tle too late. This city is twenty years old. 
It is too late to re-zone that which was 
built years ago. 

Instead, what is needed is a definite 
direction in which to head in the future. 
Vice Mayor Barbara Henley sayi she 
favors the adoption of a comprehensive, 
city-wide zoning plan for the coming 
decades. By devising one, the city could 
lay the groundwork for its future, in- 
suring that the resort area is more com- 
patable in the future. M. M. G. 



Good Grades 



Maybe it is the lilting salt water breeze, 
or perhaps it can be attributed to the 
preponderance of healthy rays of sun- 
shine which inundates these parts. 

Whatever the reason, Virginia Beach 
can boast that its school system is clearly 
among the best in the state. When the 
latest round of standardized test scores 
were released last week. Virgima Beach 
students scored above the state average in 
all catep>ries. 

The Sci«ice Research Assodates test is 
administered to all Vbgiaia {wblic school 
students in the fourth, eighth and 11th 
grades, measuring achievement in 
reading, mathematics, languid, arts, 
sc^ices, WBd social Midles. Ii^ead of 
paswig or faffing the SRA exam, students 
are ranked tai a percentile according to 
how wd they do in relaticm to thdr peers. 

I^om 1974 umU 1^1, stud«iu vof^ a 
test devised In 1971 that was n^asured 
a^nst 1971 stMdards. Thk y«ur, 
however, the ^a^ tw^ked to a test writ- 
tea in 197t» mA vm^ ivere mea^red 
^^M J978 nons, praiddmi a mwe 
current, mxm^m MHi ii nunt of studios' 



Letters To The Editor 



Enjoyed the Story, Sorry About Legislative Deletion 



EditCM-: 

I certainly appreciate and thoroughly ei^ed your 
recent special editim entitled "Hie Virginia Beach 
Story." 

I am sorry that nothing was included about the 
Virginia Beach State Legislative delegation, but I 
certainly understand that you cannot think of and cover 
everything. 



CHennMcOanan 

Virgfaiia Beach Delegate 

Vvginia General Assembly 

Wt an sorry that tvtry (Hf/ermt Virginia Btaehcon- 
MtUumcy was not r$presanted in "The Virginia Beach 
Story. " Air, due to tbne and space ttmitotions, we w«re 
biHmd. • Eitttor 



i 

1 



Glad to See WIC Article, Want More Participation 



Editor: 

The staff of the Virginia Beach WIC Program was 
pleased to see the article ai the special supplemental 
food program for women, infants, and children in your 
July 21 paper. Your readers may be interested to know 
that the Virginia Beach WIC Program is located in the 
Birchwood Office Park, and our phone number is 
463-4244. 

The WIC Program provides certain nutritious foods 
to pregnant and postpartum women and children up to 
the age of five who are low-income and a nutritional 
risk. 

Nutrition education is an important part of WIC, thus 



all participants revive individual nutrition counselling 
and attend classes on nutrition, wise food shopping, 
and planning nutritious meals. The WIC Program 
cmphaisizes good nutrition, routine health check-ui» 
and nutrition education, resulting in the unproved 
health of our participants. 

"Die WIC Pr(«ram is a division of the Vu^ginia Beach 
Health Department. For more infOTmation please call 
the WIC office or the Health Department. 

, Mariaime Hastoglis, 

Nutritionist, 

Virginia Beach WIC Program 



Really Appreciate the Story 



^f^Jeally appreciated the special section, "The on one of the nation's fastest growing cities. You 

Virginia Beach Story" which was in the July 28th »*»<»*<* be proud of the effort. 

edition of the Sun. Frank S&noson 

. It's about time someone did something of this scope \%gi^ Beach 






Exclusive Sun Columns Are A Plus 



progress. 

For Vu-ginia Beach, the 1982 results are 
extremely promising. The ctiy's lowest 
score was a 56th percentile mark for four- 
th grade reading. Still, this translates that 
^Virginia Beach fourth graders scored 
higher than 56 percent of the nation's 
fourth graders. The high mark for 
Virginia Beach was a 68th percentile mark 
for eighth grade math. The remainder of 
the scores ranged in the mid-60's. 

In other words, Virginia Be«:h students 
are learning, and they are l^uning well. 
No doubt, the aptitude of these kids can 
be attribute to a host of socio-economic 
factors. Most of these kids enjoy a com- 
fortable lifestyle, and having such advan- 
tages would seem to be conducive to the 
Mlucational ptocess. However, much 
praise must be bestow^ upon the school 
system's teachers, as well. 

When it comes down to the three R's, 
rei^tt', 'ritin', and *rithmati€, a teiK^her 
who can relate to his students cim make 
all the difference. And in Virginia B^ch, 
there must be a $ftAi deal of ttese types of 
teachers. - M. M. G. 



Editw: 

I just wanted you to know how much we ei\joy 
reading the weekly cdumns which appear in The 
Virginia Beach Sun. 

My favOTite is "Library Sunlines." Honestly, I never 
knew the public libraries offered so mudt, The 
agricultural cdumn "Sun Flower" ttul : the' Grime 



MilMM^ We|i«Mjiy|L 




s 



Within lidc^iter Area 

One Year • *9.aO 

Two Yews -*12.00 



GragGoldfari) 
Editor 

Att Other Xrcas 

One Year -•11.00 

Two Yean - 117.00 



SecMd Obm Poi<i«e Is Paid at Ljra^ivca Statioa 
in VirgiBia BeMh, Vbiliriii 



Solvers article are also very good. 

I like your newspaper because of the articles it prints 
that are not printed elsewhere. Keep up the good wo-k. 
Also, I like the paper's bigger size. 

BiU Williams. 
! , \^rginia Beach 

- I / i. ;' :. -^ ;■ <-j;i: " 







Th§ Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and 
encourages letters to the editor. They 
should be typed, doiM spao^d^and in- 
clude the miters name, addnss and 
phone number. Mail letters to The 
Virgtnia Beach Sun, J 38 South Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, VA, 23452. 




Write Your Lawmakers 



At the state level, Virginia Beadi is rq^resoited 
by four Senators and four Del^ates. When the 
Gmeral Assembly is in session, address memben 
at: 

General'Assembly Building 

910 Capital Street 

Richmond, Virgima 23219 

State Senate: 

IMstrict S, 6, 7: 

Peter K.Babala8(D) 

210 Atlantic !*tedcHiat ftmk Building 

41S Saint Paul's Bmitevwd 

N<^olk. Virgima 23S10 

Phone:(804)622-3100 

Evelyn M. Haley (D) 

lS3SVeniUei Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 23S09 

Phone: (804)6271346 

Stanley C. Walker (D) 

P.O. Box 12883 

Norfolk, Vhrginia 23302 

Phone: (804) 833-9280 



Itetrict8 



i^. JosqA CwMda, Ir. (R) 
ilOOS.ttnineckRowl 
Virginia Beach. Virginia 23434 
Phone:(804)422-8833 



IMstrict 14: 



WllUaiBT.Park«(D) 
: 324Cete^moad 
Chenpeake, 1%^te 23320 
Phone: (804) 347-l«» 



HooseofDci^ates: 

Dbrtr^38: 

^^ William lUO^er) O'Brien (R) 

Vi^^B^A. Vir^ia 23431 

Mdi l flgpaKt W 

13»LMUnllowl,^S 

Vk^riaBeat^^gWa 23431 

noM:a04)<^.lW9 



Glenn B. McCbman (D) 

423 S.Witchduck Road 

Vir^nia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Phone:(804)497-9431 

Owen B. Pickett (D) 

P.O. Box 2127 

VirginU Beach, Virgima 23432 

Phone: (804) 340^11 

J.W.(BiUy) O'Brien (D) 

3300 Ocean Shon Avenue 

Virginia Beach. Virginia 23431 

Phone:(804)481-3964 



At the fed«al tevd, Vuginia Beach is rq>resen- 
ted by two Seaaton and two CM^resnnen: 

U.S. Seutc: 

The Honorable John W. Warner (R) 

Rocn £^9 IHrloa Building 

Wtthfagton. D.C. 20310 

Phone:(202)224-2023 

The Hcmorabte Harry F. ^rd a) 

417 RttsseU Office fttfMiiig 

Washington, D.C. 20310 

Phone:(202)224-4024 

US* H<NMe M l^^ca^itallves: 

9ee^C^we^<^ I^t^ 

Vaa HiM»MeQ.WWam Whitehurst QR) 

2427 Ri^bum Home Offt:e Building 

WMUn^M.D.C. 20313 

Phrae: 0^^3-4213 

Alio: ^mht^a 0«, ftite 601 

Vhv^BeaA.Vfa9nia 23462 
nrane: 00^^0-2393 

Fevft0^p«^oi^ Uattkt 

Tte HomrAleRiAm W. Danid, Jr. at) 

^36 Ri^^ nwie (^ke teOA^ 

WiM^Mi. D.C. jmis 

Ate: 21SPeteiaBi^fag 
^irt^MMth, ^^q^ria 23*^0 
;^4)441-«797 



rt^-^^ 



Community News 



Virginia B«u:h Sun, August 1 1 , 1982 3 



-r. 



Violence is What Tliey Seeic 



/ 



Rapists Don't Get Their 
"Jollies" With Just Sex 



By Greg Ooldfarb 
Sun Editor 

In the maJOTity of Virginia Beach rape cases, sexual 
satis factiOT is not the rapist's primary goal. Their 
dbjectxvc is gaining complete domination over another 
person, report local sexual trauma experts. 

For this reason, if a woman senses the threat of rape, 
experts advise submission. If she doesn't submit, and 
chooses to fight and resist, she increases her chances of 
sustaining bodily injury and possibly death. Remember 
it is violence, not sex, the rapist seeks. 

Virginia Beach rape rates, accwding to the State 
Police, fell between 1980 to 1981. from 105 to 93. For 
the first six months of this year, Jan. 1 through June 30, 
45 rapes have been repated. That averages out to 
about 7.5 rapes a month, or ahnost two a week. 

Not every repeated rape makes its way into 
newspaper cdumns, usually oily the mwe brutal <Hies. 

For example, two recent Virgmia Beach rape 
ccmvictions were reported. In one case the offender 
pistol-whipped his victim with a BB gun befwe the 
rape. In the other, the rapist beat his victim with a 
hammer before defiling her. 

The use of weapons in the cwnmission of rapes 
underscc»res the assertioi made by local sexual trauma 
experts Dr. Ray Iglecia, a psychaitrist and neurdogist, 
and his wife Yvette, a certified sex therapist. Ihey 
cMitend that rape is a crime of violence, and sex has 
very little to do with it. 

"Rape is a vident, aggressive act but the sexual i»Ct: 
is not the impOTtant issue," said Dr. Iglecia, who altmg 



with Yvette, estabUshed this area's first sexual trauma 

units. 

"Rape is an act where the rapist needs to have 
complete and total contrd over the person he is 
raping," he continued. "They don't get their joUies 
with just the sex." . ^ 

Implicit in all rapes is the underlying possibih^ of 
personal injury to the victim. 

"Generally there's a threat," Dr. Iglecia said. "It 
doesn't have to be with a weapon either. The mere 
size of a 200 lb. man against a 90 lb. woman poses quite 
a threat in itself. Or, the threat could be verbal." 

Coivicted rapbt usually end up in prison. Few of 
them receive any psychological therapy, however, in 
regard to why they committed rape. But because these 
pcoi^ are psychologically blemished, coupled with 
other mental and physical problems, experts cast 
rapists in a mentally disordered light, as opposed to 
being sexually deranged. 

"Most rapists are not sexually adequate people. 
Dr. Iglecia said. "Agreat majority of them have a lot of 
sexual difficulties, such as with impotence ami 
premature ejaculation . . .every rapist should be dealt 
with psychologically." , 

TUe ^lecias' agree that excessive amounts ot drugs 
and alcdid do not produce a mental state disengaging 
a rapist from his actions. . ^, 

"There has to be some psychdogical factw fw it, 
Mrs. Iglecia said. "You have to study the background 
of a person. They need intensive treatment to get out 
A^ pathdpgy that is in them. " 

Most rapists are repeat offenders and have been 




Dr. Raymond £giecia and his wife Yvette. 
Rapists need to have complete and total control over victim, the Iglecias ' say. 



•rt:.) 



tSl.' i 



:' a. 






abused by others in some way. 

"Agre^it maJOTity of rapists have been abused," she 
said. "It may not have necessarily been sexual, it could 
be physical, verbal, sexual ot psychdogical. They 
could have been deprived of a lot of things during their 
life. They have a great deal of anger in them and rape 
is the Mily way they can let it (xit. If rapists were dcring 
it for sex, they's go about it another way." 

Mrs. Iglecia emphazises that rapist's motivatiOTi 
stems from vidence, not from sex. 

"The rapist wants to enjoy and see the dehumanized 
perscm," she said. "TTie first goal of the offender is to 
express a^)g£Land contrd the victim. Ihey always try 
to do harm. That'slyiiy we tell the victim not to resist- 
That just causes him to owne aa more." » 



Mrs. Iglecia is quick to point Out that in rape cases, 
not only is the woman traumatized, but also the 
husband, boyfriend, ot family members. 

She also notes that rapes do not have to happen 
between just men and wranan. Since rape is the act of 
making someone do something against their will, men 
can rape men, wranen can rape women or women can 
rape men. 

"It's all the same thing," she said. 

The best thing for a woman to do to avdd rape is 
keep herself out of trouble. 

"We must try to teach people how to stay out of this 
predicament, aod;wh?ttQci| if they find themselves in 
it," Mrs. Igiecj#'a|M.^^e!yidence is what the victim 
has to be careftiloL They must protect themself." 



fiiiJ 






Assistant Commonwealth's Attorney Repeif '^' 

Most Rapists High on Drugs^-^Ieoliol 



Bob MOTecock, an assistant to Virginia Beach 
CommOTiwealth's Attorney Paul SciOTtino, says 
the prosecutOT's office handles about 50 rape 



In most cases the use of a weapon Is nc 
common. Excessive use of drugs and alcdiol, 
however, is common. 

"Peq?le are wierd and rape ioi every reason 
under the sun," Morecock said. 

"I don't see any trends," he continued, "but 
most of them seem to have been aai of their mind 
on drugs ot alcohol when they did it." 



lilt :< . ;;. - :''■■( 

Morecpcksaijif b^ fcpJ? ,tl^?,use^9^ weapons is 

unusual. i , 

*^Rape & vielenii%heihei**Wel^p(bnis used ot 
> iK^.fcMfai; X ifltteiiite.^Mtol^J?geto»i8fa- to ' 

cases I'm fanrilia? wH}^. -^<^TP, wa? nipt ffuct Mse of 
weapons, iliose cases in whiclj weapwis are used 
are usuaBy the OT«ei','lHdii*Vtliaf makis It'to the 
newspapers.'-' ' -^ ^' Vmu''} '• ^ v^. -,;, 

MOTecdck also noM thatj.^qme; rapes occur 
because, for sprae pK;(^lej» "it',? tffJgh to relate to 
sexuality." i 



I 

■s 



invite you to the formal opening of the 

GREAT BRIDGE CHAPEL 

Saturday, August 14th from 10 a.m. until 9 p.in. 
Sunday, August 15th from 1 p.m. until 9 p.m. 




DEDICATION 
Sunday, August 15th at 3 p.m. 




HOLLOMON-BROWN j FUNERAL 
& SNELLINGS \ HOMES 



524 Cedar Road 



547-95 1 1 




Fifst Savings and Loan 

Association 

of Suffolk 

is Dedicated to Being 
Good Local 

"Citizens" 

We're Now Part of 
Citizens Savings & Loan 

i We're one of the largest and strongest federally-chartered 

savings and loan associations in Virginia. Citizens' assets 

now total nearly $340,000,000. At July 31. its net worth was 

three times the required minimum. With offices in Suffolk, Franklin, 

Virginia Beach and Portsmouth, plus 1 offices in the Richmond 

area and one in Farmville, we're dedicated to providing a full 

rar^e of "hometown" savings and investment sen/ices. 

for Smart Money Managers 



CUizens 

SAVINGSGIiOAN 

Suffolk. 1 1 7 Market Street. 539-2323 

FrartUin. 510 North Main Street, 562-21 63 

Virginia Beach, 5284 Providence fto«3, 495-0932 

Portwnouth. TowwMrt, Nrtctory&wtevMtl. 488-4541 



/ 



Glasses on 
Lawn Care 

The Virginia Beach 
department of 

Agriculture will sponsor 
two free classes on lawn 
care. 

A class on lawn 
establishment will be held 
on Tuesday, Sept. 7 and a 
class on lawn maintenance 
will be held on Thursday, 
Sept. 9. 

Both will last from 7 to 
9 p.m. and will be held in 
the Agriculture Building, 
Virginia Beach Municipal 
Center. 

WecdKUlen 

The Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriculture/Cooperative 
Extension Service cautions 
Beach homeowners who 
use a "Weed and Feed" 
fertilize on their lawn to 
read the product label. 

The herbicides or weed 
killers contain^ in these 
products may also damage 
trees and shrubs if not 
u^d properly. 

SoflTa^ 

The Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriculture/Cooperative 
Extension Servic* will test 
soil for lawns and gardens 
free of charge. 

Soil for faU vegetable 
gardens ami f«ct» lawns 
should be tested now for 
nutrienu and t^ i^ed i(x 
lime. 

Soil samples can be 
dropped ©ff at any 
Virginia Beach Library, 
Tiaberlake Nur^ry, m 
Lon^B Bridge Nw^ry. 
AUow a minimma of thr« 
i^ks f<y r«ultt to be 
retum«i. 



MMM 



tt 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, August 1 1 , 1982 



Beach Entertainment 



Woodstock-era Singer Rocks Beach 



After 4-year Absence 
Cocker Hasn 't Lost a Beat 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Sui'f Writer 

From football stadiums 
across the country to a 
farm in upstate New York, 
the man once drew hun- 
dreds of thousands to his 
ccKicert performances. 
Last week, within the 
intimate ccNifines of a 
Virginia Beach nightclub, 
this once legendary rock 
and rdl balladeer sang for 
scnne 700 patrons. 

Well over a decade has 
passed since Joe Cocker 
first took the stage at 
Woodstock and made a 
name fcM- himself with his 
spastic movements and 



hoarse vocal interpretat- 
ions. "A Little Help From 
My Friends," the classic 
Beatles' song, became a 
Cocker staple, and he 
became an internaticxial 
superstar. With such hits 
as "FeeUn' Alright." 
"High Time We Went," 
and "You Are So Beauti- 
ful," the Sheffield, Engl- 
and native carved a place 
fw himself in the upper 
echelon of rock superstar- 
dom. 

But, a funny thing hap- 
pened between the pina- 
cle of Cocker's success in 
the early 1970's and his 
appearance last week at 
Revue's. He went down 




C^ker 



and out. Too much drink, 
too many drugs, and some 
rather unwise financiai 
investments led to Cock- 
er's down&ll, as be went 
into professioikl hiberna- 
tion more than four )rears 
ago. 

htow Cocker is on the 
comeback trail. One c& 
the first stops on Cocker's 
sojourn to reclaim his lost 
celebrity status was in 
Virginia Beach. Backed 
by a new crew cS musici- 
ans. Cocker confirmed to 
those in attendance that 
he has not lost his touch. 
He can stiU whale a tune 
with the best of them, and 
still do it in his own 
unique way. 

Many of the numbers in 
the Cocker repetoire pos- 
ses a new flavor due. no 
doubt, to the back-up 
vocals delivered by a pair ' 
of black gospel singers, 
Linda Lawrence and Max- 
ine Green. The soulful 
renditicxis, coupled with 
excellent guitar bass and 
drum wOTk added new 
dimension to songs which 
would have seemed stale 
otherwise. 

Despite the new addit- 
ions to the show, one 
element was the same as 
always: Cocker's stage 
presence. Just like al- 
ways. Cocker appeared 
confused and befuddled 
as he stared aimlessly out 
into space. His arms 
jerked back and forth as 
he wobbled near the micr- 
ophone. His stomach 
protruded from his tight- 
ly-fitting Union Jack emb- 
ellished ^T-shirt. Gone,^ 
howevSf^ Were the faded' 
blue jeans of the days of 
Haight Ashbury. Instead, 
Cocker spcvted a pair of 





ON THE A 
AND IN THE 



WITH DANNY McCLAIN 

Tidewater's Top 13 
presented weekly as a courtesy of: Danny McOafai on 
WGH radio. 

1. Eye (rf the Tiger - Survivor 

2. You Should Hear How She Talks About You 
Melissa Manchester 

3. Hard to Say I'm S«Ty - Oiicago 

4. Blue Eyes - Elton Jdm 

5. Rosanna - Toto 

6. Personally - Karla Bonoff 

7. Even the Nights Are Better - Air Supply 

8. Love Will TXim You Around - Kenny Rogers 

9. (% Julie - Barry Manilow 

10. Wasted on the Way - Crosby, Stills & Nash 

1 1 . Take it Away - Paul McCartney 

12. Love or Let Me Be Lonely - Paul Davis 

13. Hdd Me - Fleetwood Mac 



Joe Cocker At Rogus'i' 



ntoto by Roy BaMIs, Jr. 



designer ^ans, which did 
not seem to suit him. 

Ail in all, the Whisper. 
Qmcerts - produced show 
was an enjoyable foray 
into the by-gone days of 
flower power and long 
hair. Message, a New 
York based clone of Jour- 
ney, who Flayed REO 
Speedwagcxi and .^ia, . 
was professional sounding 
enough. The group'^ 
probleigjvas JJbat JtsJ?ia», 
nd of music just didn't 4it ' 
in with the schen^i of 
things that evening. TTie 
night belcHiged to Cocker. 



Three 

Orchestra 

Concerts 

The Virginia Wesleyan 
Qrilege Orchestra Work- 
shop will present three 
concerts during the twel- 
fth annual workshop this 
summer. These ccmcerts, 
all free and c^n to the 
public, will be presented 
in the cdlege's Hofheimer 
Theater. Reservations 
should be made by calling 
the ccrflege switchboard at 
461-3232. 

The times and dates for 
the concerts are listed 
below: 

Aug. 14, 2 p.m. - Cham- 
ber Ensembles Concert. 

Aug. 14, 4 p.m. - Piano 
Recitals. 

Aug. 14, 8 p.m. - Work- 
shop Orchestra Qxicert. 



Valentine 
Ball Set 

The Valentim Ball 
Committee for T^fcwater 
City Council d Beta ^- 
ma Phi wiU hold iu Man- 
ning Meeting at the tone 
of Mrs. Richard Strong, 
3024 Ashbwn Tern»:e, on 
Thursday, August 12 at 
7:30 p.m. 

The Committee consists 
of the fdlowing members: 
Chairman: Qndy Strong. 
Co-Chairman: Vnum 
Dean ami Joan Ctark of 
Preceptor Al|rfia Mu; Syl- 
via Oirnm and Feggy 
F&rreU of Xi Alfrtw Mu; 
Sharon Decker (rf^Xi Alpte 
Rho; Arleiw Rrke, 1981 
Vatentine Princxss and 
Kathy Scarborough of Be- 
ta A^ka; Be^ mOt of 
Beta Mb; Cvdi Owen 
ami Sandra Hi^tes ot 
ZetaKa^w. 

CkB MS-15:^ fior ame 
iafionHUisn. 




LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY 
WITH RAY BROWN 
ON THE PIANO 



COCKTAILS 
Dinner Served 't9 2M a-m. 



You're Coins To Love Our 
2" THICK 

NEW YORK 

SIRLOIN STEAK 

-$1095 



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4- 

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4- 
4- 
4' 

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4 



****•**♦•*** #♦****** ***-*-* ***** 



^ 



O 



This lute wmt be tdkm^Mic aA 4- 

V wher, can ihu 4»J^ *MM A ACS * 

uOWEGG X 




IIAND I 

• SNUFF I 

mwomm 4 

THOMPSON I 
BAIW 4 

AUGUST 21»Ace. Up»H o9b.o.; 

2g.M ■■• I • ■ . ' ^V "Hwoir Bond 4' 
pa fil MMrifll •ombbtco » 

TICKITSi 
•11.00 »«y«f 



HUlttY, OiT 

YOIM nCKITS 




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For Info Citf l-934-0W7.1MfcG PRODUCTWNS • * 



GOLDEN DOME 

FAMILY FUN CENTERS 



more than 



LIVE MAINE LOBSTER 



VALLE'S 



iMorth th« ,' 

20 min. tiip to Poftemoirth! 
3010 HIGH ST.-PORTSMOUTH 
397-8196 

Please call for difscttona. 
Open 8 a.B.-2 a.cn. (doaad Hondaya) 




Tou deserve a fioe meal expertly 
served Id the relaxed atmosphere of Old Virgioia. 

That's just what you get at the Aberdeen Barns. 



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SUNDAYS 12-10 

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If you thought you couldn't afford it great seafood dinner, 
w you hav€«t been to ValWs lately, S^ what a diflFerence <^ 
buying lobster and dams by the boatkiad can do for the price. 



Twin Maine 
lobsters 

Shpfe Dioner 
Makie Lobsier 



GoUea ftied ^/Toc 
Kliole aams TO 



&d(ed Stuffed or Boiled. Come* with 



an eadfe» swob <tf £um sweet Com- 



C^^wand 



«a-tl»Cob, vcuev own < 
^^ cvMQ ImI^ Rous you am 
faaadle. (For one peiscm only.) 

dK^ce ctf Bofled or ^ked Stuffed 
Loteer and Gdden Fr^ Qams. 
Cqums with all die aan^ fixins as 
above. 



of om Great Values. &ked 
■td or Boi^L Comj^ete with aB- 
^iHeat Cc»n-<w-tl«-0^ iMMmc: 



made 



: Snr and orm bued R0II& 



A full i^Me of 1^^ teader CfauDos. 
Cms^ with lA ^ aune 







/ 



Virginii Beach Sun, August 1 1 , 1982 5 



it: 



Of. 



Video Views 



Courtesy of THE MUSIC DEN 

THE GREAT SANTINI - Robert DuvaU stars in this 
Warner Bros. fUm as Bull Meechum, a wanior. an ace, 
a hard-drinking dinosaur of a man who oUls himself 
The Great Santini. It's only a mask, but his family has 
to live with it. And his son has to grow up in his 
shadow. 

MAGIC ' A terrifying love story. A love affair between 
a man who takes refuge in an iUusionary world and a 
beautiful woman, hungry for the mlkation of her 
youthful dreams. Tc^ether they are caught up in a web 
of circumstances that creates an atmosph^e of terror 
from the very first frame of the film. Rated R. 

NORTH A VENUE IRREGULARS - The new preacher 
in town joins forces with the most unlikdy group of 
organized crime fighters - six lady church members, who 
are dedicated, eager, ready, willing. . . everything but 
organized! The mult is an action-packed comic caper 
that's the funni^t Walt Disney comedy every filmed. 



Beach Arts Center 



_ k 



Winners' Show 



For the second coniec- 
tttive year, the ^rginia 
Beadi ^^ts Center is pre- 
senting ah exhibition 
comprised of the winiwrs 
of its Annual Memben' 
Show, an event in whkfa 
eadi member of the ^^ro 
Center has an opportunity 
to exhibit. The winnen 
were chosen l^ Margaret 
Burke, acting director of 
the \%ginia Museum, 
Richmond. \^ginia. 

Titled "Seven n," the 
show will open on August 
12 and run through Aug- 
ust 28 at the Arts Center. 



r 






19 2-1 9 5 




G«il(t»l*»l«fn*«, 
ConpMy 'B> 



TheCompleleEpic 

TCnNIGHTATS 

OR 8:15... OR 9:45... 

...or11;19 

ForllieFiist'nnie 
On Video GasBetle- 

Ej^oy One Of America's 
IMiyGraitaaBks 

WHEMEVlRYOVWAWn 



fflUIIC D€A 



606 Hilltop West Shopping CentBr 



Featured this year are 
seven artists in the Tide- 
water area whose worls 
encompass a wide variety 
of media. 

Skipi^ Anderson, win- 
ner of the Mayw's Trophy 
Award in the Members 
Show, has won numerous 
awards thrcxighout the 
state for her realistic wat- 
ercolor s<»nes. 

Both Ed Carson and 
Dee Heslop Proescher 
were selected for the sec- 
ond time. Carson has 
been painting seric^isly 
since 1963 and has takes 
many awards in painting, 
sculpture and drawing. 
Rroesdher has exhibited 
her works in acrylic and 
gn^diite in various galler- 
ies on the East Coast. 

An instructs at the 
Arts Center, Suzanne Ste- 
vens is a favorite among 
the students. She works 
in watercdors, charcoal 
and pastels and has exhib- 



ited extensively in the 
Tidewater area. 

VcHinie Whitworth is a 
fashion illustrate who en- 
joys working in watercol'or 
and pencil. Her works are 
realistic in both execution 
and subject matter. 

A commercial artist. 
Caroline Newbill has just 
recently returned to draw- 
ing for pleasure. TTie 
Members' Show was her 
first exhibiticm for compe- 
tition. 

As a fiber artist, Lynne 
Sward has participated 
and wcHi awards in a 
number of juried exhibit- 
ions. Her w(7k includes 
quilts, soft sculpture, 
jewelry and clothing. 

August gallery hours at 
the Virginia Beach Arts 
Center are 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Monday through 
Saturday. The Center is 
located at 1711 Arctic 
Avenue, Virginia Beach. 
Virginia. 




Main Event '82 Tomorrow 

Vir^nla Beach Whisper Concerts presents the Main Event 1982 tomorrow 
night at 8 p.m. at Norfolk Scope. Featared attractlou for the concert Include 
Kannu (above) with such hits as "Carry On Wayvrard Son" and "Dust in the 
Wind." Blue Oyster Cult (below) will Join Kauas, pcrfomdng such smash 
singes as "Don't Fear the Iteaper" and "Burning For You." Joining these 
two bands will be special guest Aldo Nova, who scored re(»ntly on the 
BUiboard charts vdth the record, "Fantasy." Tickets are available at all 
Mothers Record Stores, Barr's Pharmacy Urdfaind Records, and Tracks 
Records and Tapes. 



I 



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72 LOCATIONS TO GET 
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Gail Harts, below, and Victoria Taylor Owens ^rect the Gail Harts Dance Com- 
pany at the GIris Club of Portsmouth and at the Birdsong Recreation Center in Suf- 
folk. Virginia Beach residents can learn tap, baHet, pofaitc. Jazz, modem and 
freestyle dancing as well as filmmaking and thMter from Harts and Owens by 
enrolUng in their classes. Information is available by calling 483-2297. 



Spence AnnouAces 



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locatioiw: 



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the » pHtidpattag Sidou. 



Delegate Melvin M. 
Spence has announcxd 
that he will seek re- 
electicm to the General 
Assembly. 



Under the new redistri- 
cting i^an, Spence, a Re- 
publican, will seek elect- 
ion to the 81st EMstrict. 
He will be exposed by 
Democrat Owen Pickett. 




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6 Virginia Beach Sun, August 11, 1982 



^. 



Beach Sports 



More Than A Dozen Marinas, 1,000's of Boats 




Some of the 114 ships at the Ocean Way Marina on Winston Salem Road. 



Sbarra Hitek (L) ud RoMn Walker of Draw's Boat Service swab the decks of "The dam Digger" 
jhwn MKhipoi^o, Va. at Hm Ocean Way Marine. 









Virginia Beach is Boat Heaven i 



f 



■»*- 



By Milce Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

With 38 miles of the dty bcrdering the Atlantic 
Ocean, 51.3 square miles (rf'city land ccmsumed 
by freshwater lakes and creeks, and accessibility 
readily available to the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia 
Beach is, without doubt, a prime location fcnr 
boating enthusiasts. 

Sailboats, catamarans, water skiing tri-hulls 
and small pleasure crafts speckle the horizon aci 
any given sunny afternoon. And what of the 
crafts which cannot be towed on the back of 
automobiles? Where aw tlieyatond. and wJutck> 
their owners do with them? 

In Virginia Beach, there are mace than a dozen 
marinas which provide homes for mcH'e than 1 ,000 
large boats. On Winston Salem Avenue, just 
n(Mth of Rudee bilet, is the Ocean Way Marine, 
owned by city councilwoman Nancy Oeech. and 
two partners. 

Nestled within the 1 14 slips there, the Mark VI 
is anchived. At 36 feet in length, the vessel is 
somewhat diminutive in comparisoa to the other 
crafts at the marina. Still, by any standard, a 
$100,000 price tag classifies any boat as BIG. 

Waldo Roberts, owner of the Medic Center 
Hiarmacy on ISgh Street in Portsmouth, is 
modest in discussing his boat, a 1978 fiberglass 
Chris Craft. 

"The Mark VI certainly isn't that big," he said. 



"There are many boats that are much bigger. For 
now, it suits my needs." 

^ Those needs, Roberts said, include just one 
thing: fishing. "It's my main hobby in life," he 
said. "Offshwe fishing iox bill fish is my passion. 
I used to go out three or fwir times a week. But 
with gas costing $300 a trip, I had to cut back to 
twice a week." How does Roberts afford $600 a 
week in gas to go fishing? "You've got to have a 
lot of good friends," he muses. 

"Fishing is fun fw everycme except the fish," 
Roberts said. "While we're up in the boat having 
a good time, the fish is out there fighting for his 

Despite the c(mcern for the ^Pr welfare, 
Roberts continues to stalk them for nicreation 
and fcM- competiti(Hi. Last fall, Roberts wcm the 
Stewart Light Tackle Fishing Tournament in the 
most caught and tagged categcay. He caught a SI 
pound sailfish last ye^, whidi was, he sai^ the 
largest in the state. And 'wJie^^it cipp^s.Jp., 
swapping fish tales, Roberts has a million of 
them. 

"I Mice fought a swcx-dfish for three hours and 
45 njinutcs," he said. "I eventually won, thcHigh. 
llien, there was the time I lan4pd a 417 pound 
blue marlin. He took three hours and 15 miniates 
to catch. 1 did that by tiring him out." 

Roberts said he never dreamed of owning a 
boat until five years ago when he went fishing 
vkith some friends. ^'I wound up catching a white 



marlin that day," he said. "So, the next day, I 
had to go out and buy a boat of my own. 

"I Mf ed to play gdf a lot." Roberts said. "I'd 
jgo down tol^yrtle Beach about twice a year and 
spei^ i. fortune. Hie cost cS equi|»nent wasn't 
jbueh, but tlie other expenses for travel and hoteb 
ladded up. htow, I know this boat costs me more 
than gdfing, but not a lot more." 

Asked whether ownership of such an object of 
"■iU^IBf 'IvOQitl'etoitljr tiim as neh, Roberts said 
no. "I don't feei affluent, just very fortunate," he 
said. "Being in the pharmaceutical business, I 
feel luclff in that pet^lf are always going to be 
sickandiefl4tf^<f^f ■ ^<N wh^tlier t|ie econon^^T 
is good If JpheIi Iin goiflv to nake my money. 

"I lememMr wnen I was a kid, I used to think I 
was rich if I had $20 in my pocket," Roberts said. 
"Today, it is far different. I have to make 
monthly payments on my boat just like the 
average guys make payments on their cars. It's 
basididly the same thing." 
< Roberts said Iw wiU Dot keep the boat until it is 
ptfid (^ because "it will be obsdete by then. 
Nobody keeps a boat more than four or five years 
because titegs start breaking down on them." 
''Roberts saki he is always repairing one thing or 
another on his boat. "In fact, that's how I spend 
'moBf <^my time on this boat, fixing it up." 
' ^hen he does decide to trade in the Mwk VI, 
Robeiis said he would go for a bigger boat, 
"something over 40 Itei" he said. j 




Roberts 

Vm splii^i^ a Uttic on mysdf now . . 
This is how I hsve fan. 



"The kids are out (tf rallege now," he said. 
"I've taken care erf' all my responsibilities, so now 
Pm splurging a little on myself. You're never too 
3kl to have a little fiin. and this is how I have 
!un." 



Southern Regiohals 



Virginia Beach Netters tp Compete Nationally 



It will be an all- Virginia 
look when the winners of 
the Mid-Atlantic Section 
Champicmship of the Mic- 
held) Light League Ten- 
nis Program arrive in 
Amelia Island Plantation, 
Florida, for the USTA/Mi- 
chelob Light Southern Re- 
gional Championship on 
August 14 and 15. 

All five Virginia teams 
woi tlKir divisions ~ 
Men's 5.5, 4.5, and 3.5, 
and Women's 4.5 and 3.5 
~ during the weekend 
tournament held at the 
Virginia Beach Racquet 
Qub, competing against 
teams firom Mar^and, 
West Virginia, and the 
District of Columbia. 

The two-day event, run 
for USTA/MidMlob Light 
by the Virginia Beach 
Tennis Patrons' AssodM- 
i<xi, featured 17 teams 
from the three states and 
the District oi Columbia. 
Heavy rain fvced all fkKf 
onto six intkxr courts 
Saturday, causing some 
matches to run past aM- 
mght. But sunny skies 
tvought smiles to tourna- 
ment director Betty Wsati 
mA USTA's Etaune Fr^- 
mm md Xhm MtcDnmikl 



~ and to the players - 
when Sunday's play could 
get back on schedule by 
bringing the dozen out- 
door courts into use. 

In the top 5.5 Men's 
Division, the Vu-ginia Be- 
adi Raiders won all their 
matdies by downing West 
Wginia 5-0 and Maryland 
and the District of Cdum- 
bia 4-1. Billy Foster and 
Whitney Saunders fiU the 
singles slots for the Raid- 
ers. Playing doubles are 
Ken Love and Bob Hende- 
rson, Steve Cutchin and 
Dave Ounn, and Captain 
David Slack and Tom Ts- 
ao. Andy Steingc^ also 
played in two matches, 
first with Bob Hender- 
son and then with Tom 
Tsao. 

In Men's 4.5 play, But- 
di's Raintree team (rf 
Richmond, Virginia, won 
tte EXvision tewttly by 
downing both Maryland 
and tke Distria (tf Colam- 
bia 1^ 4-1 nurgiM. T!% 
^glnk ctumi^cm, cap- 
taiMd by ^Mch Schtme. 
had George O^vbeU and 
Les ft^ m stalks ud 

ci Kttch Schutte aad Bel) 
ftedy, Bruoe Walter mA 



BUI Franklin, and Jem 
Mansfield and Bill Pilgr- 
im. 

The Men's 3.5 champ- 
ion, the No-Nanxs of 
Virginia Beach, defeated 
West Virginia and Mary- 
land 3-2 and the District of 
Columbia S-0 for their 
envision title. Del Karl- 
sen, Kenny Snelling, and 
Ray Buck played singles 
for the No-Names. Play- 
ing doubfes were teams 
made up of Bob Neff and 
Mike Gegan, Scott Page 
and Steve Jacobson, Cal- 
vin Breit and Ben Schloss, 
Soxt Page and Ben Schl- 
oss, and Co-Captains 
Se^nour Teach and Will- 
iam Stempfe. 

For tlM women, tlM top 
5.5 IXviskm will be re|xe- 
sented by the Shirley Ra- 
cquest Qub team fitxn 
Springfield who were on- 
ontested. Caixained by 
Marilyn Anderson, team 
members a^ Enid Web- 
er, Helen OU&, A^rey 
Rafeel, Podgw Denton, 
Salty SheRwne. &mty 
^tennwlson, Pu Barcfaiv- 
id, AMsia Pml^tt^t ^ 
Marren MeelMa. 

The Virginia BeacA Ac- 
es won tlM WooMn's 4.5 



Division by edging both 
the MaryUnd and the 
District of Columbia te- 
ams 3-2. Baitey Hurley 
played #1 ^ks for the 
Aces, who had to forfeit 
#2 due to an out-of-town 
player. Playing doubtes 
for t&'^^eep were Jo Ann 
Neff and Jo Slaughter, 
Captain Diane Deaton and 
Carol Futral, and Syhia 
Deaton and Mary Banett. 

Virginia took the Wom- 
en's 3.5 Division by defea- 
ting the ^strict of Colum- 
bia 4-1 and MarylaiMi 5-0. 
The Rui^jie te^ oi Ric- 
hmond ftatnietl Jwum 
Baykv ai^^athy Akxai- 
der at sU^les and (kubles 
teanu of ^aptaiii ^%ian 
^eve^qpinl Fay B;^ 
ank, Chrq| fcy^ wd 
Ann PUgran, Md Siezry 
Martin and Ap^WIt Wat- 
ers. 

The Tournament wed 
Uie NttMiud Tents Hitt- 
ing ^3gnupi*s muMfical 
ratii^ system* iMsed on a 
1-7 s(»le, with 1 bei^ a 
be^amt awi 7 a workt- 
€ta»s t^cyet. In UB- 
XA/A^kA U§H Ua- 
§m Tti^, 3.S w re^vd- 
ed as a "low mtetmi B M - 
ate," a 4.S M a "^ 



intermediate," and a 5.5 
as an "advanced" player. 
Ibe NnUP^nle is used in 
Leagtie play to offer a 
competitive ksvel to all 
tenutt {riayers. Mtxt i«ii- 
vidual team nutA cons- 
ists of two Siloes ami 
three dovUM^ mgbdies, 
with Ae ^un ttat wins 
the best of five m^ches 
Adored tl» wimer. 

Ater AmeUa bland, 
Ae Regknal n^mmn will 
advance to the USTA/Mi- 
chek)b Ugte »teiaaal 
Teuia OumipieBtlup at 
dicl^TA NtticBai 1%mils 

ow. N^ Varic. MooMpM 
^pdnst tte Centt^ Ae 
Jtaific, and liie Nirtt 
Atkuttic Regidial 4ii9> 
Ions. The Nykoab ai« a 
iwlmlnwrion of om^i cf 
jnctke and Im^c 4^ 
Jte die 24 bcM t^iti or 
dwir ability in the IWed 
IMrrtanudlsMi 
pMd trip lo 
^y to the Nittald Fwdi 
SepM^tr 24 ^mt^ M 
il tte site or ^ U. S. 
Gl^n. 

Men's 33 DMriw 

Vkg^ (Va. Bcadi) d. 



Maryland 3 - 2, d. DUtria 
ot Columbia S - 0, d. 
West. 

Virginia 3- 2; W.Va.d. 
D.C 5 - 0, d. Md. 5 - 0; 
Md. d. D.C. 3 - 2. 



Men's 43 Dbfiiai 

Va. (RictooiKi) d. D.C 
4-1. d.Md.4-1, d. W. 
Va.4-1;D.C. d. Md. 4- 



1; W. Va.d.aC.3.2. 

Men's S3 OlvMoB 

Va.(Va,Bch.)d. D.C4 
-l.d.W.ya.5-0,d. Md. 
4 - 1; OXl d. Md, 3 - 2; 
Md. d. W. Va. 3 - 2. 

Wonei's3.SDIvlslasi 

Va. (Ridunond) d. Md. 



5-0,d. U.C.4-l;D.C.d 
Md. 3 - 2. 

Wanea'i4.SDiviskMi 

Va. (Va. Bch.) d. D.C. 3 
- 2, d. Md. 3 - 2; Md. d. 
D.C. 3 - 2. 

WoMea'iS.5DiTlskM 

BYE (No chalbmgers in 
Sectionals). 



Soccer Registration Set 

TheBoftCUbeiYuii- Titfce feMues, ages For membership infor- 

ttta Bta^, 4441 Sntth seven through nine, 10 matton, cM the Boys d- 

Boukiwd, is iMJ^of re- through 13. and 14 thro- ub. toctt^ in the United 

gism^on for the M tai- -wtb 16. emphuise sUB W^r Fairily Center iwar 

tex soi^r ki«wt for (feiwlopment. l^re are Moutt 1hahn»re, at 499- 

*—-" no try-outs. 2311. 



Billfish Tournament 

Vlr^a %mA (tfte- ToamaMt. to be hM Ik^Mvina. 

mm an knkaA m earn- Sitiirrtay ^m^ ^a^, Mmwabeaim^d 

pe^ la the 1« A^nal Scpl.4tem«h«. Otf U7-^36 r« awie ia- 

^^C^raHUAA Rei^a- M the Am* C»«^m 



I 



^m^i^^m 



_y_ r » j g^- rjg r^ ^^ Tg,^ «» ^ *•»• 



B^m^:^mi^f9^^ 



Virgiiiia Be«ch Sun. August 1 1 . 1982 7 



r/«^ 




390 Players 

140 Singles, 125 Doubles Teams Compete 
at the 3rd Annual Banana Open 



f 






TtacRebeb 



Plaza Little League 



Rebels Win Western Division 



1 V 

1 By Jackie Matthews 
I ^nlVi respondent 

1 

i The Western Division 
i of the Plaza Uttle League 
jFarm Baseball has been 
I won by the Rebels. 

1 The manager of the 
I Rebels is Andy Lantz, the 
i coach is Paul Rooks and 
! the team mother is Bar- 
• bara Rooks. The team 
i played 18 games, ani 



were undefeated in their 
division and rally had fair 
losses to the Eastern jbivi- 
sion, making for at season 
of 14-4 ;' 



1 { 



I Kevin R«*s, ftst yej|r 
I in baseball, was the moif 
\ outstanding hitter on thd 



team. Lantz said, "if the 
bull was thrown near the 
strike zone Kevin could 
hit it." Kevin ended the 
season with a 775 aver- 
age. Dcmnie Frantz, se- 
cond year on the team, 
w;is the most versatile 
player. "Doimie has co- 
me a long way in just two 
ycarsi," said Lantz. 



^elly Matthews, first 
year in basebaU, was the 
pitcher upon wUch the 
team coiOited. lantz com- 
mented Aat Kelly l»s the 
strongest arm he had see9 
in awhile for an eiglit year 
.old. Kelly could reaUj 
hum them into tire ^aicht 



er, Chris Friel and Chris 
stayed right with it, tag- 
ging them out at home ra 
throwing to the third bas- 
eman. Jay Lantz, who 
never hesitated to get 
them out at third. If the 
ball went toward first, 
Doug White was always 
ready to do his job as first 
baseman. 

All the players; have 
special qualities, th^t is 
what makes a winning 
team. 



The members qn the 
Rebels are: Donnieji Fra- 
ntz 10 years center field^w 
pitcher; Chris Fri^l, 1,0 
yeafs catclicr; David, Hii- 



ges, eight years left field; 
Jeremy Ki^en, eight ye- 
ars second base dr left 
field; Jay Lantz, eight 
years tlurd base^'^Kelly^ 
Matthews, eight years pi- 
tcher'; Paul Osborne, 10 
yoars right field; Kevin 
Rooks, eight years short 
stop; Melik Spain, eight 
years left field or pitcher, 
Jamey Tedesco, nine ye- 
ars second base; Soott* 
Timothy,, # years left 
fiH4 Ppu^; White, JO 
VeailS firit biise, and Erie 
IZimmerman, eight years 
right field. ^ 

Vnfi season ended with 
a ^ig treat when all the 
Rfibels.rode in th^ Gener- 
jd Lee, ,9ourt0sy of the 
Virgiri|d' Beach Dodge. 



The 3rd Annual Banana 
Open Tennis Tournament, 
played U Owls Creek 
Tennis Center saw 140 . 
singles players and 123 
doubles teams competing 
for titles in the various 
divisions. Termed the 
most sucMssfUl Banana 
Open ever by tournament 
officials, the tournament 
drew 390 players firom 
throughout the Mid-At- 
lantic area. 

Sponsored l^ Norfolk 
Banana Distributors, Inc., 
in exjunction with Chiqu- 
ita, DelMonte and Dole, 
the Banana Open saw 
singles hopefiib battling 
it our for championship 
titles in four men's and 
four women's divisions, 
giving way to the doubles 
teams during the seccmd 
week of competition. 

A feature of the Banana 
Open is that each player 



ccxnpetes against players 
of their own level. Both 
men and wcnnen have a 
singles and a doubles 
division bracketed into the 
standard United States 
Tennis Association's pla- 
yer rating scale of 3.0 - 
3.5,* 4.0 - 4.5. 5.0 - 5.5, 
and 6.0 and up, with 3.0 
representing an "interm- 
ediate" player and 6.0 an 
"advanced tournament" 
player. The Banana Open 
6.0 and up is an open 
category, drawing many 
of the top-ranked players 
from a wide area. 

The Banana Qpen is run 
fw the spcmsOTS by the 
Virginia Beach Tennis Pa- 
trons Associatioi, with 
any profits from the tour- 
nament gCHng toward fur- 
ther promotiOTi and deve- 
Iqpment of tennis in the 
area. Jean Smith was the 
tournament director. 



Singles Champions 

Men's 3.5 division: Del 
Karlsen d. Bill Rigney 6 - 
2, 6 - 3. 

Men 4.5 divisioi: Tom 
Williams d., Steve New- 
man 6-1,6-2. 

Men's 5.5 division; 
Terry Stark d., Doug 
aarke2-6,6-4,7-6(7- 
2). 

Men's 6.0 divisicm: 
Mike Capp d., Billy Foster 
7-6.5-7,6-1. 

WcMnen's 3.5 divisioi: 
Connie Bdling d., There- 
saaarke7-6(7-3, 7-5. 

Women's 4.5 divisi(xi: 
Nancy Carmines d.. Don- 
na Bergner 6 - 2, 6 - 3. 

Women's 5.5 divisicm: 
Mary Terrell d., Nancy 
Carmines 6 - 1, 6 - 1. 

Women's 6.0 division: 
Janet Harpold d., Jaunita 
Etheridge 3 - 6, 7 - 6 (8 • 
6). 6-1. 



Doubles Champions 

Men's 3.5 division: 
Byrd-Roache d., Calcutt- 
Jester 5 - 7. 7 - 5. 6 - 3. 
Men's 4.5 division: 
Din-Din d., Aldag-Gdd- 
farb 6-1,6-3. 

Men's 5.5 divisicm: 
Chantry-Yost d., Bennett- 
Land 7 - 5. 7 - 5. 

Men's 6.0 division: 
Love-Cutchin d., Hender- 
son-Foster 6 - 2. 6 - 1. 

Women's 3.5 division: 
Qarke-Boyd d., Griffith- 
WilUs 2 - 6, 6 - 0, 6 - 2. 

Wwnen's 4.5 division: 
Gallagher-Osbech d., Hu- 
rwitz-Roberson 6-2,6-4. 

Women's 5.5 division: 
Carmines-Tyrrell d., Gri- 
er-CoUins 6 - 4. 4 - 6, 6 - 3. 

Wcwnen's 6.0 division: 
JOTden-Renn d., Carmin- 
es-Tyrrell 7 - 5. 6 - 3. 



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Calendar of Events 







11: Trip to Bosch Gardens, t^ea 8*12, 
VmiC/Kiiiya¥ll0j'pi>fcSi it* te WUioiMMcd^ for 
more Inf ormatloB caU Y#ii(||dBnf^ps» iSfiAWk 

11-12: ndewatcr Jr. Golf Tonnwnwnt, Bow 
Creek Mnaldpal Golf Coanc, for more lafor- 
matioB eaU Yoatli ActlvltiM, 467-4SS4. 

12: aty-wide ivmmer pre-teen amitera and 
park acltlvlty eenttnclMCi 

12: Oly-wlte snmam prc>-tieii awl tera and 
imrk activity centers dote. 

12: 'Toumameiit of Charaiilon, 3-5 p.m. Teen 
Loun^, VBRC/KcmpavWc, w^mmib of wcdtfy 
toBmameats compete, for OMre iBfornutiOB ciA 
Yoflth Scr^ccs, 4M-\Wl. 

13: C.L.A.S.P. SwtaB Party, VBRC/Bow 
Ck^, for more InfonaBtlon call 481-7774. 

13: SBmmcr Therapeutic Recitation Pn^raau 
eoMlodc. 

13: Teen OouUe Pl^ Pong ToBnumwat, 4 
p.m. Game Boom, YBRC/XeiiqMvffle, fmr more 
iBf ormalioB etSi YmUi Scfvkm at ^5-1893. 

13: Senior Qtlana Cdviries S^iBare INmce, 7-10 
p.m., VBRC/Bow CM»rf(, for more iBformatloB 
can463-«505. 

14-15: McB'a Tenala ToBnuHWBt, Teaidi 
Courts, VBRC/Kempivlllc, two divUow - S.O 
U8TA Ratlag or kettcr and 4.5 USTA Rattag aad 
lem, limited to flrit 32 appHcaM bi Mck AfWoa, 
entry deadlae to Ai«Mt 7, Ice $4 per pcnoa aad a 
acw caa of tenlde kals, tropUm praMted, 
refradimmtt, for aioic taf orawtfea eaU 4^1^2. 

14: Fl«i Market, 10 a,m.-4 p.m., coM $5 per 
taMc, icgtoter witk AdiMt Scrvkm at VBRC/Kcbh 
pavfflc; tke aecond SMarday of caek iMBtk, w la- 
door ftai attikei wlU be kcM, for autre Infor- 
mattoa AdaM Scrvfcas at 49^1892. 

15: Saate**S«ickhit ApiMI»tfMMav"'UMclB 
VBRC/KMipii«t, AdnynMralloa Offfea at 1 
p.m., Banar wBI be kcM Novembw 20 and 21, 
vaM fiadHty nee owd laqi^ad, $5 per iaUc, for 
iMWC iaf wnaailOB citf ^-1^1. 

15: Seator attaea ice Oaam Soefad and HiU 
Dance, %4 p.m.. Room #117. vnC/Kampfi«e, 
homemade lee ercam, cfiterMoiM and dandag, 
prteci awarded for moat ocatfv* hall, rmafvatfoaa 
an le^^rad. odl AdaM Scrvleca M «S-U92. 

15: Snmmtr ^mrfayt Band Concarta, U.S. Air 
Force Protocol Band, 7:9 p Ji^ fwa, Worwagl a n 
La^ Paikj f or BMiK laf ormttltoa eal Pcrf frmlat 

Artt,«5-I^ 
15: Litoni»Hftt,l«wtVWIC/*»wqiwkalf 

a.m., for mm* WarmiMoH eal 4«3-€itS. 

17-Ort. 15: Uapw ^^ for M«i*a fall SoftbaD 

Lm^c* f*r ■«>« tafoTM^M caV AthMca al 

17: B^ AiMMi Omtert, i^m 17 Md andcr, 2 
p.m. Ta8nlMNpi.^M&^KfiHP^^Nr 



Park, 4-8 p.m. 
, i.i.«««t far BMn tafor- 



18: TrMi lo WvMt* '< 



19: Svdrt Bowl, 1& a.m.^12 Noon, kldibaU 
lovniameit, VBRC/KempsviUe, lor more <iavor- 
matloBcaU 495-1892. 

19: WUderneas Chib Mfettaf,^.? p.m. 
VBRC/Bow Crc^, for more , Information call \ 
463-8505. 

20: Pre-teen Krthday Party, 1:30 p.m. Teen 
Lovnge, VUlC/KempsvUle, birthday eklldrca 
must pre-rcitoter, for more iB^ommtion call 
Yonth Services, 495-1892. 

20-22: Ft. Story Beach closed. 

21-29: VIrglala Beach Qty Te^ Toaraament 
(dn^ and dMbks), Owl Creek Tennto Cmter, 
for more InformaUon call Adult Activlttes, 4C7- 
4884. 

21-22: Pre-teen Camping Trip, leave 
VBRC/Bow Creek at 6 a.m. attcndaacc reqatotd 
at dab mectlag oa Augast 19, for more iafor- 
matioBcaU 463-0505. 

21: C.L.A.S.P. Daace, 6:30-9:30 p.m. 
VBRC/Bow Creek, for more laformatioB call 
Thirapeatlca,467-48!84. 

22: Summer Sapdaya ftuid COMtrti, 7:30 ^ 
p.m., Norwc^B U^ Park, free, "Coatfacatd 
ArmyBaad." For more laforawttoa cal Pwfor- 
adngArts,495-l»2. 

23: SoBMthlag's Cookla' In Oe KttcUn, a|^ 8- 
12. 12 Noon, Room #117, VBRC/Kempsvltte, for 
more laforantloa caU Yoath Smvicm at 4<^1892. 

23^1: 7tb Aaaad Paa AiiMteai Whcddnlr 
Gamm, Nova Seotte, CMmOk^tx BMie tafor- 
matloa eal T^tl^cntks, 495*1^2. 

24: Natare Crafts Trip to Oiaal ni r c State Park, 
ages 8-12« 10 a.m.-2 p.m. VUK^ICcmpavflie, for 
moR laf ormatloa odl Yoatti S«f«icas» 4K-VKn. 

25: Prc-^a Trip to BayvffleFaraH Park, i«M 
8-12, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., co^nwt^! V^C/Kcm- 
pavUle, call Yoatt Scrvkcs, 49i.l8». 

25: Senior CMzen Hwbor Ciitoe, fte delafls 
uid re««rvatioM oA AAA S«4eM, ^1892, 
loar of Hamptoa Riwdk aad laiiRaital Wirtm^ 
wa^ from Hrm^an New* to Pw^|o iriboard dM 
'*Amcrieu Patriot,'* ce ai k wia i hiaakfist, hitf- 
fd iHch, Hve eaterminnieat, cnriac i^ ttma^ar- 
tolioatactaiM. 

Body Building Competition 

The Virginia Beach Ja^sees will sponsor a mi 
todybuikiing compctititM Sunday, ^4Eiist 29 m Camp 
Pendtetmas |wt itf the festivities of the East Coast 
Swri^ ChamfAnshiim. 

The (Mmpetidon wUI begin at ^-00 p.m. wrth a 
sepante Men's aiKl Women's dlvbioa. IVapUet wOl 
be awanted to the top thiee in each dan. Tb« ama will 
also be ^Iged by mdivklual bot^^urtt. 

Entry fwms are avdiable at all l^mrter Health 
Spas and must be received by the iayceet no later ttea 
Aagunt 27 Mafl to: Virgima Be a^Jff ^.i81 Qi«« 
Vdtey Wve, Virginia Ben^ ^l^bkr 9^^ 

For fiirtber ^fcrma^B, <»U ^5-1^0. 



Dr. DvM Gnu exunliiei CMliborr «a cigbl year old slaUion owMd by CMbvwi Arablwi Fwmi, wWch was named Region 15 
— ^GraMtChampioarorlMl. f 



Clinic for Horses 



Dr. David M. Gregg established ihe Soutneastern Virginia Equine CUnic on July 1. 1982 with the exclusive intention of treating 
honci. The clinic is located at the Princess Anne Veterinary Hospital on Magic HoUow Boulevard. 

Dr GreiB graduated from Michigan SUte University in 1965 and worked in the Shenandoah Valley for 1 Vi years. He moved back 
to Northern Michigan and setUed near Kalamozoo. During his stay in Michigan he estabUshed an Equine Practice in 1972. After 
visiting VtniBia Beach, he decided that the area was more to his liking and sold his Equine Practice in Michigan. 

His wife Kathie and four children will be joining him soon. . 

He aUo raises and shows Tennessee Walking Horses having had several Michigan Sute champions. 




f 



k\ 



Bu driver Kcvia Sagp* 



Photo- sieve HaU. 



The Sugg's and Their Coach Keep Rolling 



^JacUe Matthews 

SmCWTC^ondou 
If ytm havm't noticed 
OM of tl» bri^t grem 
and white Ivey CMch 
%vMa travdiag do«m 
^qi^ Bea^ BcHilrvard, 
taatt thmi Hk^ you mx» 
win. 

The hwcs are owned 
Mid operated by Ivey W. 
^«»MdMsfhs^. 
Ikt Sw are Virginia 
Mttvm Mid Imve 
reafn- 
^IHik ni^lHiwefmtf 
eliAnK Amb, 18 years 
aM, a Piteeem AfUM High 



School graduate; Matt, 
14. a stutoit at Iwlepai- 
^noe JuniOT High School; 
Craig, 12, and Sarah, 9, 
both students at Thalia 
Bonoitary. 

Su^i is emploj^ by 
the Fcwd Motor Co. He 
was a i»rt-time driver for 
a load bus company, thus 
giving him the tdoi of star- 
ti^ his own ^uutering 
bussCTvioe. 

In 19M Suggs pur- 
dwsed Ms firM bus, a 39 
so^. He MM tte drive 
and Marlene, his wife, 
took iwre of the bo(4dnp 



for the bus and all the 
papa work. The children 
Ittmed quickly to clean 
and wash the bus until it 
sfMrkled. This sometime 
mmnt being woken up in 
the middle of the night to 
wash and clam a bus in 
freezing weather, so it 
would shine for iht next 
day's booking. E^«n the 
^ghbora have a imrt in 
this advoituK. l^eyhave 
givCT the Sugp tMr ^U 
Mpp(»t. It is n<M unusual 
to fiml a nei^rtKjr M|Nng 
change the oil or cleaninf 
a raach. Ne^y idl of 



them have been on one 
trip or another. 

A second bus was pur- 
chased in 1981, with a 39 
seat capacity. A van 
seating 15 was also 
acquired to accomodate 
smaller groups. And just 
recently a luxury bus 
seating 47 was purchased. 
The tour servi<« that star- 
ted with wwkend trips to 
Busch G^dens ami Kinp 
Dominion now has ex- 
panded to continuous 
trif» all ovw the United 
States, Canada and 
Msdro. 



«V^«P^«i 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, August 11, 1982 

City Council 



Leash Law 



Dog Owners Want Special Areas for Pets to Play 



(Continued from Page 1) 

dog owners a chance to be heard. The law would 
require a d(^ to be restrained by a leash ot other 
restraint when off its owner's property. The law would 
not apply to the rural southern half of the city. 

Dog owners were around to be heard Monday, 
anyway, but were referred to David Grochmal, 



Chamber Sponsored 



Breakfest Forum 
Features Clayton 



The chairman and chief 
executive officer for the 
newly merged Norfolk 
Southern Corporation will 
be the speaker at the 
eighth annual area-wide 
Chamber of Commerce 
Breakfast Forum at 
Virginia Wesleyan College 
on Tuesday, August 31. 

Robert B. Claytor will 
address the topic of ex- 
panding relationships 
between Norfolk Southern 
and the Port of Hampton 
Roads at 8 a.m. breakfast 
meeting in Virginia 
Wesleyan's Pruden 
Lounge. 
.!,. Directors from the six 



Chambers of Commerce 
in the Hampton Road's 
area - Chesapeake, Nor- 
folk, the Peninsula, Por- 
tsmouth, Suffolk and 
Virginia Beach - will at- 
tend this annual meeting. 

Previous topics for the 
annual forums have in- 
cluded the impact of the 
military, crime, solid 
waste disposal, oppor- 
tunities for area-wide 
cooperation, and the port 
of Hampton Roads. 

Persons who plan to at- 
tend should make reser- 
vations through one of the 
area Chambers of Com- 
merce by August 24. 



Voter I^egistration 
While at Home 



In order to register 
, Virginia Beach citizens 
|,who are unable Ui iippiy ^ 
'for vbter registration in 
! person, a representative 
t of the General Registrar 
» will visit citizens cm the 
'following days: 
i M(mday, August 16; 
i Monday, August 23; We- 
i dnesday, September 8; 



and Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 15. 

. Jj)4ividu«lsiiuiyreauest 
this service if they have a 
continued illness ot physi- 
cal disability that has 
existed for at least thirty 
days . Forms to request a 
visit are available by call- 
ing the General Registrar 
at 427-4667. 



Clean As You 
Can Get 

Commercial & Residential Cleaning 
One Time or by Contract 



340-4718 
428-4291 
340-0236 

Mailiof Addrea: 

274 Raintree Road 
Va Beach, VA 23452 








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Queen Amie, O^pciidale, etc. 
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Opei M<»..S«t. 10-7 f ^ I 

2tMOrat Ite:k Square Shof^MBg CmUs 
i^xwrn Otmi Neck Rd. and 1st ColonW) 



assistant to the city manager currently in charge of the 
leash law. After a session with ten to 15 dog owners 
and members of the Gtizens' Ccnnmittee, he concluded 
that the people would support the leash law if the city 
designated places where and times when the dogs 
could run free. 

That's about what Councilman Jack Jennings said at 
an informal sessi(»i of Q>uncil when the prc^osed 
ordinance was discussed. Also, Lee Carruth has drawn 
up petitions seeking support of the same stand. 
Georgia Stokes, 6005 Atlantic Avenue, and Jane 
Hofferbert, of 60th Street, said Monday they had 
obtained 100 signatures on the petition since the day 
before. 

At present the law reads that a dog. when off the 
owner's property, must be in the custody of a 
responsible person, scnneone the dog will obey. 

Since the enactment of the law in 1977 in Fairfax 
County the number of animal bites have decreased 
frOTi 1,495 in 1977 to 1,100 in 1980 and the number of 
animals quarantined also reduced the cost of housing 
dogs for the County; and the population of Fairfax 
County has increased by approximately 60,000 since 
1977 while the number of dog complaints has not 
increased significantly. 

The Qty of Alexandria has experienced a 35 per cent 
decrease in dog bite cases over the past six years since 
the least law was enacted; the number of dog bites 
originiating frcnn strays that were never identified and 
quarantined dropped from 22 percent to less than one 
percent since the leash law was passed; in the past four 
years, stray animals in the shelter have declined by 62 
percent. 

During the past two years, the Virginia Beach Animal 
Contrd Bureau has received 20,242 complaints iat dogs 
running at large anc) 2,263 dog bits were reported of 
which 813 or 36 percent occured off the dog owner's 
property. 

Included with the nOTthern end of the city where the 
leash Taw would be in effect will be the scxithern 
conmunities of Redmill Farms, Lagomar and Sandbri- 
dge. It 

^ i ■ - - 



Grochmal said the ^limal Bureau has 24 emi^oyees 
of which 14 are irardens and the greatest number of 
ccxnplaints involve animals miming at large. 

Councilwoman Meyera Obemdorf saM that she had 
received queries from people interiBited in allowing the 
use of grounds aroumt schools or pvks where owners 
can allow their dogs to exercise. CXMrndorf, the owner 
of four dogs, also asked how the law c«i be enforced 
when the staff is having difficulty policing animals at 
large. 

Grochmal said that the committee discussed exerc- 
ise, but that people who don't have dogs are bothered 
by this, (fe sud that if the city opened up grounds to 
dogs, people would let their dogs run wiki. He said that 
dogs can be exercised on a leash. He said that dogs 
who have a certificate from obetSence school might be 
exempted. "There is not dog who will always d)ey." 
he said. 

Councilwoman Nancy Qvech said that the issue was 
highly emotioial. She said that she was concerned 
about the enforcement of the current ordinance and the 
expense that may be involved in enforcing k leash law. 

Councilman Dr. J. Vexay McCoy Jr. asked, "Why 
are we into this thing? Ihe cure may be worse than the 
c(Midition." 

Grochmal said that without a leash law, "we get 
conplaints." 

Councihnan Hardd Heischober said that many 
people walked with unleashed dogs for protection. He 
said he doesn't walk without tm large dog as much as 
he did previously. 

Creech said she wanted to know the additional cost. 

City Manager Thomas H. Meuhlcnbecksaid that the 
higher level of service will result m more people calling, 
adding to demands on manpower and vehicles. 



Cbuncilman W. H. Kitdhin HI swd that if fines are 
levied and they are substmtial enough, people would 
he discouraged from breaking the law. As to using 
school jwoperty. Kitchin said he taught physical 
education for a few yews and one in 1000 persons will 
use a s<K)op. He si^ tfie things be has seen cm the 
oceanfront in the spring of the ytzs are "beyoijd 
comprehension." He said that people "stand there and 
let their dogs defecate On somebody else's property." 
He said he's lived to a neighborhood with 27 dogs in 
two blocks and "there's not a spare blade of grass 
usable." 

Muehlenbeck said that the city expects a rise in the 
cost and then a tapering off. 

Creek said she was not t^posed to the law but just 
cGocemed about the cost. 

Jennings suggested deferring the item and and 
asking the committee toconisider setting aside areas for 
exercise. He said he had a 1 10-pound dog and "I want 
to exercise him." 

(%erndorf indicated that the leash law won't answer 
all problems. She said slw keeps her four d(%s in her 
back yard, but people with dogs on leashes "use our 
lawn." 

During the discussion cm deferral, McCoy said 
deferrals compound problems. 

Kitchin said the committee also should c(Hisider the 
problems inherent in allowing certain areas to be used 
for exercise such as cleaning up afterward. 

Jennings said he would not vote foe the CH-dinance 
unless there is an exercise provision. 



Motorcycle Jackets - Leather Pants, 
Vests, Chaps Western and Biker's Boots 

T.R.'sXEAmER RACK 

©i Western Shirts, 
Belts & Wallets 

1110 S. Military Hwy., Chesapeake 424-4676 

Dirfctioiu: P»m College Park Shopping Cenier Soulh "Look for Blue 
Trailer on Top of Our Building." 



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ALTERATIONS AND SEWING 





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SHOPPING CENTER 
HOLLAND ROAD 
VIROINIA BEACH 



Lduje's 



vour Household word 



Puttim 
mMM 3 9p09d 




n&OmlQr 

js^fg.49! 12" 

rsn ... I ^7 

dtoaaaiinb^ tor itoraQi. #M577 
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vm No. torn Mh- 9mM,.„...jmM 

Savi ilf.Ntt4UteK0erKfoMlP«im 
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jm4M0U(m.¥M., 8:00-5:00 SAT. 



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. _ .^ , ''M mddm dteonMw 

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Sav» $101 36" While 

RmMm^ t3g.97. 3 alumkium btades 
«w*«-^>eedwallG3iHrol. #3i704 
teve $M.0i! 41*' Brvwa CMm, Fan 
No.mi2Ibg. $7»j7,........$i»^ 

imm. %\muit^ %mm m^ 

Fa. No.31735 R^. $1»,»?.......^^ 

9m*9mMn n'*i|i^ttOrFoMMd 
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fl^ 



.^r^S W^i mv i tmi mmf 



m- m Mr-^-m-^p-m ■ 



VirginlaBeach Sun, August 11, 19|2 9 



n 



SUN Strips, Part I 



m 




The oM CavaUer Hold, built In 1927. 



Two Cavaliers Seek Unity 



Combming Yesterday With Today 



Editor's note: Tltii article is the first in- 
staUnmt of a thre^Mrtfki^nki B§t^ Sun series 
on the <^wl^ ftim 1*9 series wW investigate 
the peM, pimettt. »iil fitture ttf l^ S4-year'Old 
resorti^. 

BrMUciQolxliag 

Avei)W|. ' . 

Stroll^^dvwa' ft juirdw cobblestoM path, 
through^liag &ttb a»l ihair treat, ooa readies 
the roitf and l4^» Mitad the lazy, beautifo! 
amUeiy^ of y»ti^ltf iW stares at the odd. 
shiney fccft<te rftt»««Miit. 

QtMS deiNttts fl^ tte unnaoHtebr restated 
Qivalfer Hotel, ^mmif »927. to fi«e the sleek and 
impeeeftUe avtib HM, vi9ti«# 1973. They 
aretwowi<lueertW*l«*»raBe«»f. Each Is 
commmed to iet^i*i fti own cxduslve di*ract- 
er, yet hoth mm^ «» pWlosop^, thrt 
dictated hy the eonqti^r's ^dce |»esideBt and 

director, Boyd Qtt»^^ ,, ^ 

"I tefl every m^t$99 en the i^einites, if what 
they rtrve hr ^mmn^ wouWaH %• good 
enorah to five to tl»k wm mothers, t^n tt ton t 

TW^i^^ifcrWNMta* tt« h^t^ 
bebM' the Qwi*r» ««««» *tt>fy of 
sneeeub '«W« ti^A tf ••* ••«» « fcttt^ of 
hei^ » Nb».»' •«»««>»» »«^ *^* 
<ttw(^ Oem QfiWm. ***«» ^ «"« pem 
Uwy s«^te fc^t^W a M« desk .*r^ the 
guetti«^hMirtli*wWi»»a&. Our business 
depei^ a« ft." 

MMil|tteeiiw«tftf«i 

WMe ether *^«li to \%glnla Beach pv 
praperV ««*«» on roqas Oat are valued « an 

Tverage of li:^ ^'_2f* ^lif m 
Ckvalier's «< wS *** ^"^ « %mm^ "I 
guess the city oarnkm to to J« the bm ho»l to 
town,"^4y» GrAft»* 
TN 174 a ^m *r ^obto o«iv«wy fee 



charged by the Cavalier in the summer is "the 
lowest on the strip," according to Graham. In the 
wmter, the charge is lowered to $38, which puts 
tl^ Oivalier in the same penny-pinching league 
^ii Eccno Travel Motor Hotels and other such 
establishments for budget ctmscious travelers. 
Uaw can the Cavalier, with its ornate chandeliers, 
plush <»rpeting, and beautiful deojr afford to 
keep their prices so low? "We've been in 
%itttoess fior a laig time," Graham ventures. 
The majoity of theOivalier's bualMss comes 



fi-om the busmess community. "There's no 
question that our livlihood depends on the 
conventioi busmess," says Oaham. "We're 
fighting to keep pace with the other hotels, and 
we do it by being progressive. We're always on 
the loc^EOut for new and better ways to serve our 
guests." 

Also contributing to the Cavalier's success is 
its reputation. "This is a landmark," Graham 
says. "When peqiie thmk <rf Vi^mia Beach, they 
think td the Qividkir bequise it was here beCn-e 




there was a Virginia Beach." 

Oaham, a fwmer actor who once played Mel 
(Ml ABCtelevisicai's daytime drama, "One Life To 
live," is in charge of hyping the hotel amcng 
business representatives. Public relations is his 
game, and he spends much of his time flying 
around the country, owrting the mfluential 
and the rich. 

"1 dcm't b.s. anycHic about the hotel," Graham 
says. "1 tell them what it is going to cost and 
what we have to (rffer. We will continue to do the 
business we have done in the convention field 
because <mce people have left here, they have left 
here happy and they'll come back. Our main 
asset is wir people." 

Graham characterized the 400 Oavalier employ- 
ees as "not afiriad of ddng a lot of work, who 
aren't afraid of putting in a lot of hcmrs, and who 
would prefer to sock away their money to the bank 
togdng ait and blcwing it in the nightclubs. For 
the most part, the people who work here have a 
good time, and if the guests can sec that, they'll 
have a good time, too. Hopefully, by aeating this 
kind of atmosphere, we'll be able to bring those 
pec^le back next year." 

What of the off-season? Graham explained 
there is much money to be mMte in the 
non-summer months, as well. "We realized 
several years ago that there are only a couple erf 
mcmths a year that tourists frequent the beach, so 
we've shifted much of our focus to the 
iKMi-ttxirisu. iiesaid We're open 12 months a 
year, and the trick is to do well all year long. Ow 
of our goals would be to attract consistent 
business in the winter, so our next ma^ 
renovation is gdng to be an indoor pod." 

Oaham said suwii adduions are necessary in 
the hotel business in order to survive. "Ptopte 
that stand stUl in this Itoe (rf work are the oms 
that end up fuhng," he says. 

For this summer, ocmpam? at all hottb to tte 
region is down nearly 25 percent from last y^a. 
The Cavalier has experienced only a 12 percent 
drop to busmess from last year. Qntora u not 

(See MAKING. I^elC^ 



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10 Virginia Beach Sun. August 1 1 . 1982 



Making People Happy is Whole Ball Game 



LEGISIJ\T10N 



(Continued from Page 9) 
pushing the panic button. "Sure, business is 
down, but we're, not particularly wo-ried about 
it," he said. "Wfe're going to have a good August 
and a real good September. What we try to do is 
promote the prcqxrty. F<x instance, we're giving 
away a Hymouth Cavalier <m Octc*er 16." 
Graham blamed this year's decrease on rainy 
weather and the World's Fair in Knoxville, Tenn., 
which lured potential customers away from the 
beach. 

"Most of them realize now, though, that 
summer is quickly ccsning to a close, so they 
aren't mterested in saving their money any 
longer," Graham said. Dan BatchelOT, the 
catering manager, concurred. "When scnnebody 
really wants a vacation and he wants to be in the 
nicest place available, he is not going to be 
deterred by $74 a night," said Batchelw. "The 
next few months are going to be really good." 

Batchelcn-, 26, has been working for the hotel 
since he was in high schod. Over the years, 
Batchelor says he has learned that total commit- 
ment from the employees has been what has 
separated the Cavalier from the city's other 
hotels. "The people who wwk here have a clean 
image," he said. "They have to have a 
willingness to work, along with honesty and 
c^ness. Also, they have to be able to get al(Hig 
well with pet^le. 

Colgate agrees. "I sincerely believe we have 
dedicated people right down to the girl who cleans 
the ashtrays," he said. "The difference here is 
that nc^ody here is too big or too important to 
perform any job that needs to be done. I'll wash a 
dish CH- wait on a table if it needs to be done. 

Sonetimes the simple things are the most 
unportant, Cdgate says. "We have to make sure 
all the preliminaries are taken care of befcnv that 
guest walks through the doOT, he said. "If that 
bed is not made or that bathroom is not clean, 
then we're going to have an upset guest oa our 
hands. If we want repeat business, we have to 
make dam sure everything is right for that 
cust<Hner the first time arwmd." 

The hotel business, according to Cdgate, is "a 
battle." To be 'successful, he says "is no 
mystery. Making peq}le happy and encouraging 
them to come back is the whole ball game." 
Asked how the Cavalier stacks up against the 
cc^petitioh, Colgate merely smiles. 

"yfe are winning," he said. "And we are 
wi^ng big." 

Itatfifeerf Nolan Represents Beach in 1982 Miss Virginia Charm Pageant. 

This is a preliminary to and trophy at the 1982 
America's Miss Charm pageant and wiU reign for 
Pageant to be held in June one year in her commun- 
1983. She will be compe- ity. She will have the 
ting with other represent- 
atives from all across the 
stauf ia the T»efl J^j^: 
division. 




New Divorce Law Sets Formula 
To Divide Assets Eauil 






Mil 

Glenn Graham of the Cavalier Hotel shows potential convention customers 
•round the premises. Pictured in the old hotel's lobby are W. Robinson Worth, Jr. 
executive vice president for Printing Industries of the Virginia (r) ud Robert W. 
Golden, president of Printcraft Press, Inc (center). 



When the newly effective Equitable DistrilMh 
tion Act was working its way through Virginia's 
General Assembly, many called it a "Women's 
Divorce Law." 

"This is a big mistake," according to Donald 
Butler, a Richmond attorney and member of the 
Board of Governors for the Family Law Sectkm 
of the Virginia State Bar (VSB), which hdped 
draft and make recommendations on the le^ya- 
tion. "The lawyers who drafted this bill and who 
lobbied to get it passed felt that this was a good 
law, a just law, and one that would be a very 
effective means to help us all reach the ends (rf 
justice in divoi-ce proceedings," he said. Butler 
added, "The Equitable Distribution Act (EDA) 
does not seek to protect any group over another 
and it does not protect one partner in the mar- 
riage over another. It sin^)ly provides for the 
complete, equitable settlement of all the issues 
of a divorce." 



'*While the old saying 
'possession is nine-tenths Of the 
law" was not really a law, it had 
become one in Virginia because 
there were no adequate legal 
means to divide up marital 
property^ according to Butla: 



Until passage of the EDA this year, \^rginia 
was one of only a handful of states left in the 
country where the division of real and perscHial 
property had not been dealt with in terms of 
divorce law. Courts in Virginia had no jurisdic- 
tion to make any judgment regarding the owner- 
ship of property or regarding the award of 
property in a divorce suit. 

Butler explained, "Any judgment required sep- 
arate court suits to settle matters involving real 
and personal property. Suits rarely were filed 
because they were so cumbersome and so expen- 
sive, and few people had the resources to tiy to 
obtain their own share of marital property." 

"While previously judges had no way to solve 
property issues in a divorce suit, now they are 
apt to have before them everything from custody 
of the children to custody of the family dog," 
Butler observed 



He enphasized one important aspect of this 
MW law, that the awrt still has no authority 
to award specific properties. The EDA allows 
the jwlge only to determine the value of all mari- 
tal propM^ and to decide how that dollar vali» 
should be divided baaed on several factors. 

In some states each party is awarded half the 
mcmetaiy valiM of the total pn^rty The EDA 
allows the judge to ttetermine the most equitable 
division rather than a simple fifty-fifty split. The 
factors that contribute to the amount of a finan- 
cJal settlement include each party's contribution 
to purdiasing that prt^rty, maintaining it or 
managing it. Individiml need is also a factor. 

Butler added, "T!iecireum^aM«9 of the break- 
up of the marriage are also considered. But faul* 
in emfing a marriage will ikA necesairily prevent 
a jaity ftt>m winnii^ a financial settlement. Fault 
is only otb of the &ctors, not the only factor" 

Almost every other state also has recognized * 
the need for this kind of law to allow judges to 
fully oversee the l»^eakup of a marriage, Butler 
pointed out. In order to create a oon^lete settle- 
ment of the issues at hand in a divorce suit, the 
court must be able to fully survey and consider 
ownership, contribution, need and liability. 

lb make sure the divorce suits filed under this 
new law will be settled quickly aini with the best 
informed judgment, Commissioners in Chancery 
will be employed to assist judges. 

Tliese commissioners are usually lawyers in 
private practice, scnnetimes retired judges, who 
are ^pointed by the court to take evidence and 
to make recommendations on sorting out the mul- 
titude of details in a pn^rty settlement. 

"Commissioners will be paid according to an 
established houriy rate. The court will decide how 
much commisffloners will be paid and w^ wfll ^ 
pay. "Hris makes for a speedier, better-informed < 
settlement, but also will add to the costs d '. 
dividing up property," Butler said. | 

Obviously the EDA is untested and it will take i 
awhile before lawyers can predict how judges will '; 
work untter this law. < 

Desi^te the label of "Women's EHvorce Lawr it i 
is Virginia's most useful legal tod for assuring { 
equitable ^viaon of marital property, | 

VSB offers a free pan^hlet entitled "Divorce j 
and SepuatJon in \^iiginia." It is available by I 
writing to the ^^rginia State Bar, 700 Building, ! 
Suite 1622, Seventh and Maiii^^Streets, Richmond, I 
Virginia, 23219. ! 



•■ u. 



Kathleen Nolan, IS, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert ^Jdan of 460 Carn- 
egie Road, Virginia has 
been selected b represent 
Virginia Beach in the 1982 
MJsa Virgjnia^ OHM'™ Pag- 
eant to be held at the 
thain(?erlih Hotel in 
Hanipton, August 13 and 



Kathleen 
I official 



will receive 
title, crown 



opportunity to visit nurs- 
ing homes and hospitals, 
rk e in parades and partic- 
ip.ite in community and 
state activities and will 
volunteer her time and 
talents to civic and social 



organizations for their 
many charitable projects. 

She is a studei^t at 
Kellam High Schocrf and is 
in the 10th grade. She fs a 
member of Star.of the,Sea 
Catholic Church and her 
hobbies and interests ^e: 
dancing, singing, drama, 
tennis, volleyball. 



PHILIP LIEBMAN 



MS 






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CALL 427-2300 FOR FULL DETAILS. 




ATTORNEY A TLA W 



THE HERITAGE-ROSEMONT BUILDING 

SUITE 201 

708 SOUTH ROSEMONT ROAD 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

804-463-4722 



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VirginiaBeachSun.Aufustll. 1982 11 



Beach Gardening 



Add No Spices 



J 



Freshly Made Baby Food Better and Cheaper 



Sun 
Flower 



By Beach ExicMiM AfMt 
DoriiTraM 




Baby food made from fresh Virginia Beach produce 
costs less, is easy to prepare and provides a variety of 
healthful foods for the infant. While produce is 
plentiful, make and freeze extri^ baby food in ice cube 
trays for future use. 

A blender, food mill or even a fork can be used to 
prepare baby food from coolced fruits and vegetables 
fresh from the garden or produce market. 

Begin by washing all equipment and your hands with 
hot, soapy water and rinse thoroughly. Prepare fruits 
and vegetables by washing, peeling and removing any 
seeds, then cook until tender by steaming, bdling in a 
little water ot by baking. No salt, pepper, spices qk 
sugar should be added. 



CHESAPEAKE NEPHROLOG Y 
ASSOCIATES 

Announce the Opening of an Office 
For the Practice of Nephrology 
(Medical Diseases of the Kidney) 



110 Wimbledon Square, Suite F 

Ches(9feakei Virginia 23320 

547-9431 



r 

r 

Dayid W. Best, M.D. 
Virginia B&Kk DUtfyms Center 

1127 First Colonial Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 

481-6879 



Green Run Medical Center 

3386 Holland Road, Suite 202 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

468-0846 



Betty P-Y Yeh, M.D. 

770 Independemx Circle Suite 101 

Vi/ginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

490-3561 



OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT 



Use a food mill, blender or fork to make the codced 
food smooth, then add liquids such as cooking water, 
juice, milk or formula. Most babies don't need baby 
foods until three to four months o! age. iBabies four to 
six mtmths dd need thinner foods than dder infants 
require. 

H(Hne made baby food (^m be stored in the 
refrigerator by covering the food tightly. Codced fruits 
and vegetables shouki be stored no longer than three 
days in refrigerato-s. Raw fruits and codced meats can 
be refrigerated for only two days. 

The baby food will last safely for one month if frozen. 
Fill ice cube trays with baby food, cover with wax 
paper, and freeze until sdid. Frozen baby food cubes 
should be removed fron the trays, placed in pUutic 
bags, and labeled according to ccmtents and date of 
preparation. 

To serve frozen baby food, thaw the frozen cubes in 
the refrigeratOT, then heat in a double bdler, in a dish 
surrounded by hot vmter, or in the oven. Heat until 
warm, but do not overcook. Throw away any food the 
baby does not eat. 

Winter squash, green beans and peaches are among 
the foods suggested for homemade baby food. Parents 
should avdd giving very young babies home prepared 
beets, carrots and spinach due to their high nitrate 
c(y'tent which can lead to an abnormality in the blood. 
Older infants (six to nine months) can handle these 
foods well. 

The recipe fcx- winter squash baby food calls for 
thoroughly washing one pound of acorn, butternut or 
hubbard squash. Cut acorn squash in half, and other 
varieties in large pieces, removing seeds and stringy 



DR. ROBERT THOMAS 

AND 

DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis 
Contact Lens & Children's Vision 

1194 S. Lynnhaven Parkway 



46S'Wm 




FAIRFIELD OPTICAL CENTER 

5216 FAIRFIELD SHOPPING CENTER 
495-1974 





Do You Need... 

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American Trade ficcte^ 

216 MaUba Towers 

^M Vir^nfai B^M^h Booterard 

Vii^iyaB^uA,Va. 23«2 

M4-^3-1434 



centers. Do not remove skins. Steam squash for 25 
minutes w bake for 50 minutes at 375 degrees. Scoop 
squash out of skins and blend, adding liquid if a thinner 
food product is desired. A pound of squash yields one 
cup of five food cubes. 

One pound of tender green beans will yield one and 
cme-half cups ot eight food cubes. Wash beans, remove 
ends and strings, and steam for 20 to 30 minutes, and 
blend. 

Baby food from cooked peaches can be made by 
washing the fruit and steaming for 15 minutes. 



Peaches alsocan be baked in a covered dish with a little 
water or wrapped in fdl at 375 degrees for 20 minutes. 
After the coiaked peaches cool, remove skin and pits 
and then blend, llie recipe yields two cups or ten food 
cubes for each pound of peaches. 

F<»- more informatim on preparing hooienuute baby 
food call at write the Department of Agriculture, 
Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, VA 234S6-90(n, 
H(xne Eccxiomics Division 427-4511 for "IfomenUKie 
Baby Food," puV lication #348-012. 



Beach Farmers Prepare for Salt Testing 



Now is the time for 
Virginia Beach farmers to 
gather pasture soil sam- 
ples for testing. 

"Qxnpleting this chore 
early insures that you will 
know the correct amounts 
of lime and fertilizer to 
apply for establishment <x 
maintenance of pastures 
and hayfields," said Vir- 



ginia Beach Extension 
Agent Tom Baker. 

There are sane 1500 
acres of pastures and 
hayfields on Virginia Be- 
ach horse, cattle, and 
sheep farms. September 
is the best time to seed or 
renovate most of these 
crops in our area, accord- 
ing to Baker. 



Scnl testing is offered 
free by the Virginia Beach 
Extension Service. 

"Using Extensiai reco- 
mmendaticMis will save 
producers money by pre- 
venting excessive use of 
fertilizers at lime, while 
guaranteeing that enough 
of these products are used 
to keep pastures from 



beccMnming run-down and 
unproductive," Baker sa- 
id. 

Scnl sample boxes, data 
sheets, and directions are 
available free at the Vir- 
ginia Beach Department 
of Agriculture Coopera- 
tive Extensiai Service. 

CaU 427-4769 for more 
information. 



Gem and Mineral Show Planned at the Dome 



The Tidewater CJem and 
Mineral Society of Tide- 
water, Virginia will pre- 
sent its 12th Annual Show 
on August 13 through 15 
at the Virginia Beach Qv- 
ic Center, 19th Street and 
Pacific Avenue. 

Show hours will be 10 
a.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday 
and Saturday, and frcMn 12 



to 6 p.m. 
Admission 
ed. 



on Sunday, 
will be charg- 



Society members will 
exhibit some of their fin- 
est rtiineral specimens, 
fossils, lapidary wwk, sil- 
ver and golds mithing, 
etc.; scMne of which haye 
received trophies frc»n the 



Eastern Federatiwi of 
Mineralogical and Lapid- 
ary Societies. 

Members will demonst- 
rate how to turn minerals 
and rocks into gemst(Hies 
and how these are used in 
jewefry and other wnam- 
ental objects. 

A widely diversified 
chdce of lectures and pro- 



grams has been schedul- 
ed. ;t' ;r> "-•"..■- ,^ 

For further information 
ccHitact Brian L Stephens, 
Show Chairman, 326 Kel- 
1am Rd. #203, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23462 or 
telephone (804) 497-2745. 

Free parking Saturday 
and Sunday. 



Iphamber Holding Small Business Seminars 



•..* 



u'nm 



"Tti'e' VirgVa f^i^"^' 
CSjamber of Commerce 
wi4,present a short semi- 
nar - "The Small Business 
Administration - What 
CanItDoForMe?"-with 
guest speakers from the 
SBA ttstrict Office, on 

N^Weincsday, August 18, 

%ax 8:30 a.m. 

Speakers fw the prc^r- 



derson, Procurement Spe- 
cialist, and Guy R. Cooter, 
Management Assistance 
Officer, both with the SBA 
District Office in Richm- 
ond, and Bill Pritchard, 
chairman of the local Ser- 
vice CcH-ps of Retired Exe- 
cutives (SCORE) Chapter. 
Topics for discussion 



1*# tmia&T' llo#^1fb 

qualify and apply for an 
SBA guaranteed loan, to 
be listed for bidding on 
Federal government pro- 
curement contracts, how 
to markets to the Federal 
government, how to get 
free expert management 
assistance, what services 
SCORE can provide, and 



BIGGS AND CHESHIRE 

COURT REPORTERS 

ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF OFFICES 

AT 

2408 PRINCESS ANNE ROAD 

(ACROSS FROM THE COURTHOUSE) 

VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRGINIA 23456 



ItEGISTEREO PROFESSIONAL REPORTERS 
COMPUTER-AIDED TRANSCRIPTION 
VK>EOTAPING AVAILABLE 



The seminar will be 
held at the Chamber off- 
ice, 4512 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Cost is $5 for 
Chamber members and 
$10 for non-members. 
Additional information 
and a reservaticm broch- 
ure is available by calling 
the Chamber at 490-1221. 

300 

Dental 

Exams 

Two members of the 
Boys Qub <^ Va. Beach's 
Health Advisory Coaunit- 
tee, Dr. William Cox and 
Ms. Jerri Voetsch, recent- 
ly performed free oral 
dental exams for over 300 
children at the United 
Way Family Center, 4441 
S. Blvd. 

The Boys Qub in a 
United Way Member Ag- 
ency. Fa- more informa- 
tion call 499-2311. 



HILTON OLIVER 

Attorney-at-Law 

BANKRUPTCY-CRIMINAL DEFENSE-TRAFFIC COURT 
DiVORCE-WILLS-ADOPTIONS 



UNCONTESTED DIVORCE *85&I1 



Flexible fee arrangements on all services. 
Advance payment not required. 



4856 Hayiood Road. Suite 102 
Vhiima Beach. Va. 23455 



mmmmm 



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12 Virginia Iteach Sun, August 1 1 , 1982 



Magazines Read Mostly on the Oceanf ront 



Library 
SUHIines 

By Beach Librarian David Palmer 



I- 

5 
J 



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L 



One very hot and humid day last week, when the 
temperature was pushing 95 degrees, library spies 
went out to the Virginia Beach Oceanfront to see what 
the sun-and-sand set were reading at the beach. Tliey 
made a startling discovery -- three out of every four 
pe(^le don't read at all while soaking up the rays. We 
found lots of radios, frisbees. sand buckets and , of 



Washington Headed Troops 
in Princess Anne County 

Elizabeth B. Wingo, after admiring a dated 
history of Virginia Beach in the recently published 
"The Virginia Beach Story," called TTie Virginia 
Beach Sun newsroom to offer an additional piece 
of historical information. 

Recorded minutes from a 1752 Spotsylvania 
Board of Justices meeting indicate that George 
Washington was once in charge of the militia in 
the Princess Anne County area. 

Wingo presented a copy of the actual transcript 
of the minutes, which in part reports: 

"George Washington, Esquire, produced a 
commission under the hand and seal of the 
Honorable Robert Dinwiddle, Esquire, his Majes- 
ties lieutenant Governor and Commander in 
chief of this colony, dated the thirteenth day of 
December, 1752, to be Major and Adjutant of the 
Militia, horse and foot, in the counties of Princess 
Anne, Norfolk, Nansemond, Isle of Wight, 
Southampton, Surry, Brunswick, Prince George, 
Dinwiddle, Chesterfield, Amelia and Cumberland 
and took oaths appointed by law and signed the 
rest. 

Editor's note: 

(Spelling correction^ and word deletions were 

made in some places for clarity). 



course, every brand of suntan lotion available, but very 
few books. 

'Those pec^le that were reading had brought th« 
traditional paperback romances, mysteries, movie 
n'ovelizations and family sagas, but we found few 
hardcover books and only one current best seller, 
"Thy Brother's Wife" by Andrew Greeley. OccasioQ- 
allv, something different caught <>m eye; such as the 
young man with a tape-recordei, textbooks and 
clipboard; the woman engrossed in the French editioa 
of John Irving's "Hotel New Hampshire;" and the 
couple carefully studying a Virginia road map. 

Without a doubt, the most dramatic discovery we 
made on our informal beach readers survey was the 
number of folks reading magazines. Everywhere you 
looked, there were cc^ies of "People," "Vogue" and 
"Cosmopolitan." This got us thinking about magaz- 
ings in general and their pervasiveness in American 
society. 

Thousands of weeklies, semi-monthlies, monthlies, 
bimonthlies and quarterlies are published in theU. Si 
each year. They cover every conceivable subject and 
cater to every conceivable interest. And the numbers 
keep growing. According ^uthe '^ 't'stical v'^'^tract (rf 



the United Sutes,'* (jil^ mifaane titles appeared 
between 1980ai^i9ll. jniitt tarings the total number 
of U. S. periodical publications up to an astounding 
10,873. 

Although the Virginia Beach Public Libraries 
subsmbe only a fractioki ^that munber, the variety of 
titles availabte for use in the local bran^ libraries is 
equally astoundfaig. Whether you are a businessman ch- 
woman, student, luxttcwife, cnifU person, nature lover 
or have some other spcdal interest, at least one (tf the 
900 difftrent magazines subscribed to by the library 
system should interest you. 

Although all five bnmch libraries subscribe to a 
substantial svi^>ling df titles listed m Uie "Reader's 
Guide to Per»c^cai literature" (the basic indexing 
servi(^ for 150 oi the nxst popiUar magazines), each 
branch has a slightly diUfereiit periodical coUecticn. For 
instance, Wiitelsor Wopds Library em{diasizes musical 
interests by subscribing to such magazines as "BaU 
Board," "Harinonizer," "Song Hltt." and "Choral 
Journal." Bayside Branch Lilvary has numberous 
business periodicals designed to support the Referents 
Division located in that building, while the Oceanfront 
library subscribes to over twenty-five wrts and crafts 



oriented magazines. Each branch library also has a 
large number of children's magazines. 

To allow for maximum usage, the library system does 
npt allow its magazines to be circulated.' So, 
unfOTtunately, you can't take a library magazine to the 
beach, but when the heat becomes unbearable or your 
suntan has turned to a bum, why not stop by your local 
library and enjoy a current magazine in air-conditkin^d 
comf(Mt. Besides, we promise that you won't getfsand 
in you sneakers. 




Lecture on Post-mastectomy 



340-7485 

CHEUEA HOUSE 

aOOlVirgiaiaaMeiiBM. 

FREE CANDY-MAKING DEMO 

Peannt Butter Cups, Cherry Coidlals 

Peppermint Patties and other 

itettd<Nis molded candies. 

10 70 DISCOUNT On candy-making supplies 
With this ad. Offer good until Aug. 3 1 , 1982 



* 



Louise Rose, an expert 
on the needs of post-mast- 
ectomy women, will con- 
duct an educational semi- 

I"" 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



nar on Monday, August 
23 from f to 1 1 a.m. at 
Pembroke Wigs, 4732 



Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

For more informMion 

call toll-free 800-223-6520. 



—CLIP AND SAVE" 



« 



GEORGIA'S 
HAIRSTYLES 



BETH CHAVERIM 

(House of Friends) 

THE REFORM JEWISH CONGREGATION OF VA. BEACH 

Sabbath Services, Fridays at 8 p.m. at our temporary locaiion: 

Wesieyan Acres United Methodist C3iiirch 
715 Baker Rd. 



4S8-3440 



UtOiia: 



OmiH MIm Vmir 'aoap' 
> On e*lw TVS 



INTRODUCTORY FREE FACIAL 

with the iMW 



OIL OF MIMK 
SKIM CARE PROORAM 



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For Information, Call: 
420-5901«625-7384»497^565»497-7917 



Or Write To: 

BethChaverim 

P.O. Box 5130, Virginia Beach, 23455 



'^p^ 



K> 



' inci Cut. Blow Dry or Set " 

itnxM THif eoui^giL ! 
^EXPIRES AHgast 28, 1982 > 



I Haircut & I 

I Blow Dry . . 'd.SO | 

I Haircut ■6.00 | 

I Military I 

I Cut "3.00 I 

I Shampoo & ■ 

I Set •6.00 I 

I Haircut & I 

I Set 'SOO , 

. HHTllTllia COUPON- . 

■ EXPIRES AagusI 2S, 1982 



i^<i BwY '^ '""^ '"^ '^'^ 11 '^ '^'^ '°' "^"^ i 



■< LVNMMAVBM MBAO (Next to MicHelle'e) 
HOlffiS: TUES. WEO. FW 10« THUR 10-9; BAT 9-5 



i "So new, we're not even in the ydhw pages." I 



Keeping in touch 



That mail-box on the city corner . . . that post office at the 
country crossroads . . . what would we do without them? 

Life is too complex for us to live by ourselves. Man's interests 
and his welfare reach far beyond the ijoundarias-of his commu- 
nity. Communication with people and corporations hundreds of 
miles away is a part of modern living that welake for granted. We 
have to "keep in touch. " 

But long before life became so complex, men discovered 
their need for another kind of communication— prayer. The cour- 
age and faith and hope which steel men for the challenge of each 
day come from God. The deep spiritual needs of the soul can be 
supplied only by keeping in touch with God. 

We think our mail-tx)xes are indispens- 
able! Even so, one church means more to a 
community than all its postal facilities. For not 
so long ago men lived very happily without a 
postal system. But men have never lived 
happily without God! 



Sunday 

Hosea 

14:1-9 

Monday 

Joel 

3:9-17 

Tuesday 

Amos 

9:11-15 

Wednesday 

Micah 

4:1-5 

Thursday 

Nahum 

1:7-15 

Friday 

Revelation 

21:21-27 

Saturday 

Revelation 

22:1-7 




Soipttjrn salacMd by 
Tha Amancan BitHe Socialy 

Copynght 1962 K»a»n Actvwtoing Swvic* 
P O Bo> 8024. ChartoMavM*. Vff^nia 22901 



ToMfacctricCo. 

23IIInglesi<leRo«d 

855-3111 

Brand f^^me AfvUanca, 

M.AJ.UMdAatoPurti 

6 Days -9 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

SiOcs: 5^-9945 

IS320unpoM«ilalUMd, 
at ^MrrHighway 

Parte: 543-4110 

4108 nttiitnlrtif M^.-Portiock 




FARMBUREAi; 
INSURANCE 

Full Line Insunmce Agmcks 
•Lite* All* <^ilMM 

•Fift«|l«tli 
i.CiirtitP^a|,R%r. 

426^im 

miPriacoiAuMRMl 

PlM^ 

NaH-BM^pvP*' " 

• Acrylic Nails, piifSthM nal*. 

Manicures ft i^MHeurw 

•'Futt Nail Care For 

MenAtVomen" 

495-1222 

Providence Square Shoppii^ Ctr. 

Comer of Provideaoe Road 

and Kenpsville Road 

STITH UPHOLSTERY 

SHOP. INC. t, 

• Recoverii^ * U{Mblcnr ' 
• Repairs A Reflnishiiig 
• Custom Restybig 
FreeEslimelet 

545-5571 

lUlCaa^ertdalMi 
AtlndiulllvwRoMd 

PriBMwAaM 
EquipnwBtCorp, 

John Deert - Sties R Service 



• Unra 
• GaricM 



Daify;8toS 
Sat.: Vi Day in Summer 

421-21S1 

4«S3Battlefi«UBIvd.S. 
CiMsapealte 

Miil-ER4 

CarpctSbop 

4740 Virginia Beach Hvd. 
Vir^idaBeadi 

4974154 

. Taylor B.C»r 
AEm0^oym 

WHbPwiMtvit 
■tHHNop 

1712 L^tte Rand 
^%iMiBiacii 

42M991 

LMJtmm^iteff 

Chsrllc'i8cafoo4 



3 1 39 |PMf#|]Hve 
VkilBia Biwrh 

491.9M3 

M»y£.iM9lts 
ondEm^fm 

OvwtM'tMwkit 

1419Potadaidarftnct 



E^^Mriat Iktetti, Inc. 

1700 E. Liberty Street 

Chcsapealie, VA. 23324 

Chtffks 4 Dorothy Hacicworik 

Taylor RmIsI Cento' 

• Bampiet k Party Suplies 
• Lawn k C^den E^iuipment 

• Contractor's EquifMnent 

• Auto Repair Equipment 

• PliMiAtait Eipiipi^t 

* Owwrfaenee Item 

4^^17 

i3{?S. J^Umy H¥0' 



l^viagALoaa 

6 Convenient Ixtcalions 
To Serve You 

Drap^jrSkop 

• Comi^le selection of Fabria, 

Venetial BItiMls. Woven Woods, 

Uphoistay. R OMon ^ 

Covws 

• In-home Otnukitttom 

Smrkn tlita m wtu WmOmt 

MYw 

»^k^teyHvy. 
^fcesapealtf 



4380PemlwokcMaU 

497-4S21 

Brand Name Af^Mances, 
TV's Stereos 

WcOwcBeantySirioB 

"Hair Care for tlw 

Entire Famity" 

9:30 to 5:00 

Thursday Evenly by 

Al^TOIDtGiCTt 

dosed MiMdaj* 

jrWH^ndRoad 
Vi^aMi Beach 



The Ovmtom 'MmdEn^h^ftm 
El^lrMlCo. 






3301-n^BrlMld 



547-^ 



Friday Bozar 




Tidewater's Only Store Carrying A Complete Line Of 

Imported Middle East Foods 

$PICES, CHEESE, CANNED GOODS AND MOJ^^MOM 
UEMAJmN^ECYPT. GREECE, BAKISTAN,AND>^SI A 



K I 



OPEN 
DAILY 

11 a.m. 
to 

9 p.m. 





rand Opening 
^^Special 



^ PITA BREAD 75C 
ALL SPICES 509b BELOW 

Super Market Prices 




PHONE 
80#f 
497-6611 



533 Newtown Rd. at Lake Edward Drive-Suite 1 19 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 



B.F.Bell 

House Jacking 

& Raising 
Structural Repair 

Brick or Frame 

also 
Jacking Fireplaces Back 

To House 

622-1771 & 622-8396 



HoteVs Lawyer Says 



Ytry"i'' ^^"^ S"" A..«.«f 1 1 10«? \% 



\ 



Ordinance is Inconsistent 



(CoBtfawed Ihn Pifc 1) 

we're toins to comply 
with the ordinaiKx and 
begin immeilirteiy to en- 
doie the pttio." 

l^ WM h^hly critical 
in discussing the zoning 
ordinance, calling it "a 
matter of too little too 
tate.. Ihe city has been 
sitting on its hands for 
three decades watching 
the »tx^ develop in a 
4|iiestiaiiabie, honky took 
nuuner," he said. "Mai 
a sudden, the city sees tlw 
error in its wa^ and 
deddes to create uniform- 
ily. Ihe problem is, tbey 
won't see unifcnnity on 
the strip tot another hun- 
dred years until all the 
current hotels have rotted 
away and have to be torn 
down. Then, they'U be 
a^ to build new ones in 
CQai4>liance with the zon- 
hig ordhiance." 

By enforcing such an 



ordinance, the city "is 
hurting itself," said Jam- 
es Thunnan, attorney for 
the Greenwood. "F^os 
are great," he said. 
"Tbey have them in Nag's 
I&ad and in Myrtle Be- 
udi, aiui then the Tourist 
Bureau wonders why we 
are losing tourists to those 
two resorts. 

"Somebody who drives 
all the vmy to Virginia 
Beach for a vacation firom 
Indiana doesn't want to 
have to turn around and 
drive to Kemi»ville to 
find a decent restaurant," 
said Thurman. 

When Ihurman goes to 
bat for the Greenwood, 
the issue will be whether 
the non-conforming use, 
or grandfather clause of 
the ordinance apg^a to 
cafes in operation before 
the law was written in 
1973 or before it was 
revised in 1981. Thurm- 
an, for oie. is not worried. 



' "Yeah, Jiklge Barrow 
left the door wide open lor 
OS in the Ivuhoe^Uje," 
he said. "Our afguenteitt 
is much stronger than the 
fvanhoe's was. We l«d a 
pre-existing, non^onfo- 
nning use tl^ was Iqial. 
The Ivanhoe's was ooc. 
Another part of our a^u- 
ement is that the Green- 
wood used to be tlw Sykes 
Lodge, whkhm», built in 
the 1920's, long before 
the ordinance." 

Ulce Lyle, Ihurman 
oondenmed the ort&ian- 
ca. "It is very ii»onsist- 
ent," he said. "On the 
one hand, everything al- 
ong the boardwalk is sup- 
posed to be a hotel. Yet. 
we have two McDonald's, 
a Eteiry Queen, a 7-11, an 
anrasement pKTk and a 
Zero's. Mi^ of the 
problem stems from the 
city liBiers calling this a 
Vofly beach.' WiU, ' 
me tell you. VirguQia 



ich hasn't been a famfly 
beach in 30 years. I used 
to^»e.4own here from 
D.C. when I was in high 
school and it wasn't a 
family beadi tten eith- 
er." , 

The intent of the ordin- 
ance is "to insure that all 
outdoor iistablishntents 
remain accessory to the 
hotels," sidd Cathy Town- 
send, ah 'Employee in the 
dty's 0^ d Zoning. 
Easing (^ parking probl- 
ems and .reduction ol no- 
ise prtSUems are other 
aims of 4he ordinance, 
I>fotter smd. 

Balncm^.t«fased to dis- 
cuss hoiwhis rulingon the 
Ivanhoe might affect the 
other hotels mth cases 
pending. "Tlwre are 
sevetal cases involved in 
litigation, and anything I 
may say lewld adversely 
afTect those other cases," 

hcsjBd:; • 




The Ivanhoe Hotd, located at 21st Street and Atlantic Avenue, is the first of several Virginia Beach Inns to be 
taken to task for operating an outdoor cafe. The Greenwood Hotel at 20th Street is slated to appear in court next 
week. The Essex House and thf Slndalr are reportMlly scheduled to appear in Circuit Court. 



To Preschoolers 




Fire Safety Classes Taught 



The Virginia Beach Fire 
Department is conduding 
two workshops to teach 
fire safety to preschoolers. 
In the flrst one, a fire 
education specialist and a 
firefighter go directly to 
the preschoolers and 
! present a one hour 
program on fire safety. In 
the second, the educators 
or caretakers attend a 
three hour workshop. 
During the workshop, in- 

1 dividuab are instructed on 
how to teach preschoolers 

. about fire safety and are 



(I provided with information 
for their children. 

The workshop for 
educators and caretakers 
wiU be hdd on Wed- 
nesday, August 25, 1982 
from 6 through 9 p.m. and 
Friday, August 27, from 9 
a.m. through 12 noon at 
the Virginia Beach Fire 
Training Center, 927 
South Birdneck Road. 

For individuals who in- 
struct preschoolers, 
teaching fire safety can be 
an awesome thought. 
However, Cappy 



Sieriff John Newhart <rf Chesapeake, vke-president ^ ji^^fAaxs^cti^p J 
of the olpe Henry Qub in Virg&i* Beach, gives ^ " J .-i^^^-a 



C. Hum?£rt.>in 

t ii ; ;i'i.('i'; ,''« 'ft.., ■ ' " - i 



yirrell is 
PpQStalled^^* 
ImLA Head 



TCC Student Awarded 



Judy C. Hume, a student in the gerontdogy and 
dietetics programs at the Virginia Befrch Campus of 
Tidewater Community College, has been nanted the 
redfiient of a $200 scholarship awarded by the Cape 



Saholaifs 




ff.CT Q ; .«rf 



ifl!*'-^ 



HjBwy Club in Virginia Beach, 
itiime has completed p predit ho^cs^^^s a 3.930 






point average. 






LevxJI^Jfeesident 



Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers 



Arsonists 
are Sought 
By Police 

As of June 30, 52 cases of arson had been isported in 
the d^ of Vhghiia Beach. Neady 600,010 worth (tf 
pnyerty has been destroy^ in ttew ftes as wiU as an 
incaloMible loss as a result of emi^ee k^tf, tax 
lowet . ete. 

This mek tte ^^rginia Bea^ prime ^^«n is 
offie^^ w mwh M SI ,000 cash eeirard for infornuittdn 
coitee^ngM arson tt^ occuned In tlw tcndcm Md^e 
area. 

Ob June 21, bett^en 2:15 and 2:50 a.m., imknown 
persons enter^ H A J Auto Stovkx ki^^ at 324 
Hmim lM». After ^untag en^ tteouvh tte tram 
door, the sul^ds rcaoved marram took aiKi 
miicfnanffflii items. Flammable liquid was then 
pewed ttr«i«hOitt the strwMie ud igidted. The 
ensuing Sre ^strayed the ^^ttv i^ fflMdi oi its 
ea at eim , tateMi« 2 a u t o m flHte f. oiltee^^ortraad 
t^^m. Ite tot ta Mte^ te ei^ss oTtlOO^OO. 

If you ha^ infar^ttkm d>oM this or My odier arson 
att Qrlae Mwrs at 427410^ ^Ima Bea^h Crime 
Solwfi atoo sthn up to $1,000 kf infamUttMn about 
M^ «Aw stae nawined m Wgtnte B#di, or 
MarMtfon toa#v «» *• i^ewry of stoten ^operty 
or te oMb^ten d drugs. You may coted a aah 
fMWd and irau mmI m^t give your num. 



Dr. Gerald F. tevy, 
recently elected presU- 
ent, announces the esta- 
bUsbs^t *(A a Reform 
Coi^gfttioo in Virginia 
Beaii|:< Tl^ new congreg- 
iUio^is Beth Chaverim 
(Hd%^, Friends), the 
Refonn Jewish Congrega- 
tion of Wginia Beach. 

The group plans to afD- 
iate with the Union of 
America Hehrew Congr- 
ei^ti^i^ i^riday night 
sSidim.' 'k9 4emporarfly 
being heU in the Westle- 
ym Acres United Medio- 
(^t Church, 715 Baker 
Riwi at 8 p.m. 

^. Levy invites the 
Jewish communis U> join 
^th Chaveriol In its ser- 
vke%. The ^^^ yM 
ser^ ,ittafiairtM»«fenn 
Jews in the ^^rginia Be- 
ach area and ttereby on- 
tritnite to the future gro- 
wth (^ Judaism. Flan for 
a fe^ious Mdrad. H^ 
Hdy Day Mmees and tte 
Ufiflg ctf a ftd tioM MM 
are un<tei^Miy. 

The fltttr officers «e: 

Dr. Sidnqp Sward, vioe- 
presidcNt; Mis. Maijsde 
BradnsB, ^oeemy ud 
Mrs. Faye Mws, treasur- 
er. 

Beth Chawrim m^ be 
contMted thro^ ta oO- 
oers or Iv wriA«g ta eve 
ofP.O.BoitSlM. ^^gto- 
•'% BeMh. ^gMi 23^9. 

Ihk te tte.^ refem 
ooi^regtttan tti Vbgh^ 
fc«A. btttttt^ 
greg^oB. 



There are about 30 fom- 
ilies in the newly farmed 
congitguion. 



Carbaiigb 
is Awairded 
SchQl|(i:phip 

WiiiiBftOtrtMnigh, son 
of the ^p(^pa^Mn. K. R. 
CKbwik. of Virginia Be- 
adi^j^^y^een sele<^d to 
receive ^^^^l^enn Moth- 
erhood Member Scholar- 

C^r^^kaneof332 
Uitheiiali^idieihood a>- 
ntracftlhliirt tof«ceive 
iwdk M 'ttward tat the 
1982-83 ibademic year. 
These sMdeiM quali&d 
oii the h«tt d their 
tfriNrti^yfiF^i lea^r- 
sh^ b3^ and extra-curri- 
cular rnvdvement. 



UitiWFMi Brotherhood, 
a iuuioHil^fiM^nid bene- 
Ik uodrnf* ^ dtac^d 
OMxe ten $1.5 o^kv 
Ais y^ te s^ohMSlup 
rad feUcpmh^ i^ccnuBs. 
These ivoiruH wtt ms- 
M over 10.000 SocMty 
I, ta^mm c(M- 



i yiiben F. Farrell. a 
fii-Sg^ assistant with the 
: 'Virginia Beach law firm of 
^^ Pender and Coward, was 
I installed as President of 
f the ^tational 'Associaticm 

* of Legal Assistants 
(^iALA) at its recent ann- 
u^ meeting held in hbsh- 
viUei Tennessee. 

NALA is a national 

* organization of legal assi- 
stants with nearly 1,200 
members from throughout 
the country, and also has 
state or load affiliates in 

t twenty-two states. The 
NAIA membership is 
composed (tf legal assis- 
tants in the fields of 
litigation, probate, estate 
plaimii^, c(Kporate and 
munidpal law who are 
non-lawyers performing 
legal assignments under 
the supervision d a law- 
yer. NALA also sponsors 
an exam for individual 
voluntary certification as a 
Certi&^d Legal Assistam. 
To date, there are 528 
CLA's throughout the 
Ibuted Stittes. 

Farrell has previously 
served NALA as Regioi^ 
Director, Region U (1979- 
80), national Set^tairy for 
two terms and as Vice 
Presi(knt. He has also 
served as NALA's rep- 
resentative on the Steer- 




FarreU 

ing Committee of the New 
Rdes in the Law Ccxifer- 
ence for paralegals, educ- 
atcvs, attorneys and advo- 
cates held at Georgetown 
University in Washingtai, 
D. C. and is presently oo 
the AdvisOTy Board of that 
Conference in planning 
for its next conference. 
He has recently appeared 
before the ABA Standing 
Committee on Legal Assi- 
stants in Chicago to pre- 
sent NALA's position on 
the accreditation progr- 
ams for higher education 
institutions. 

He is a retired Navy 
Oaief Petty CMBcer, a 
number ct Bernard J. 
Ifims, Chapter 21. Disab- 
led American Veterans, 
and resides with his fami- 
ly in Virginia BeK;h. 



Come Back to School 



"Qime bfl^k to schod" 
will be the tbrust d the 
\^^inia Bduntkn Assoc- 
iation's (VEA) 1^2-83 
cooEununity relations cam- 
paign, recently aimouic- 
ed luwly-eled^d ^^A 
Rresuient BreiKla Ckyd. 

^leaking to Uxai assoc- 
ntion lewlers at the 
Long wood leadership Ac- 
ademy, QooM steted that 
^'schools are givmg more 
dian ever to V^inia. 
TljqMi^rs need to know 
ham mM^ of a bwgain tlw 
tdMXsU have become for 
ttem." atizens wiU be 
cMOuraged to visit tteir 
in^ K^ds OKI talk to 
^matan ^xait reixm 



changes and "changes 
that still need to oxne." 

VirginM Be«di Educa- 
tion Association I^sid- 
ent Maqit Maynard stat- 
ed, "We're very exdted 
about showing our par- 
ents aad community the 
excellent }db teachers are 
doing educating our stud- 
ents in Vu-ginia Beach." 

Ooyd also annouMed 
the formation at a task 
force whkA "wiU reaan- 
raeiul to the VEA ways to 
significantly improve qiM- 
Uty in siKh areas (tf instr- 
ucti«i as the secondary 
curriculum, tewdier pre- 
l»nitian aid eertifiati- 
on. 



Meredith, Are education 
specialist with the Virginia 
Beach Fire Department, 
states that "even 
preschoolers can grasp fire 
safety instruction if simple 
words are used and con- 
cepts dramatized to help 
them understand the 
massage. During 

preschool years, the 
child's mind is yearning 
for knowledge." The 
Virginia Beach Preschool 
Fire Safety Program is 
geared to take advantage 
of this receptivity. 



S#. 



In 1979/80 the Fire 
Safety Program reached 
199 children through six 
classes. In 1981/82 this 
number increased to 47 
programs which reached 
2,704 preschoolers. t 



For additional infor- 
nution regarding either of 
these programs, or to 
register for the Workshop 
contact Ms. Cappy 
Meredith at the Virginia 
Beach Fire Education Of- 

.ill 




9'wmxmf: 



Cricket McCall 



Beach Resident is 
Cover Girl Finalist 



Cricket McCaU. 17, of 
Virginia Beach, has been 
chosen one of eight semi- 
finaUsts in the "First Lo- 
ve" from Silhouette cover 
girl (xxitest, in a nation- 
wide search for a teenage 
girl to appear on the cover 
of a "First Love" from 
Silhouette romance novel. 

"First Love" from Silh- 
ouette bod(s is a series of 
teen romaofxs fteaturing 
young models on their 
covers in a "slice of life" 
setting. The lucky First 
Love fttxn Silhouette cov- 
er girl can expe<A to sc»- 
her face on over 90,000 
Silhouette covers. 

Executives at Silhoiette 
Bods, the foemost U.S. 
publister at brawl muK 



contemporary romance 
and sponso^s of the con- 
test, will choose four final- 
ists who wiU be flown to 
Hdlywood fcx^ an all-exp- 
ense-paid trip to cc^nplete 
the judging, receive a 
special make-over by Max 
Factw, see the sights and 
meet several teen stars. 

"This is a first in the 
publishing industry and 
the response to our search 
was fabulous ~ we hsd 
thousands of entries. 
Now we face the task ai 
narrowing the group to 
four and selecting a win- 
ner. It wiB be hard, 
they're all terrific girls," 
said Mona Altman, Silho- 
uette BocAs' director of 
marketii^ communicatio- 
w. 



Polly Miller to Meet 



T3w PoUy Milter Char- 
ter Chai^r, erf the Ameri- 
om l^i^ss Won^n's 
Associatkm, wiU Md iu 



HMnthly ^naer iMc^g 
at tte CkMen Ooml. in 
Ken^vilte, on Kfowhiy, 
A^ust 9, at 6:30 p.m. 



»: 



I 



mmmmmmmmm 



14 V ^aiia Beach Sun, August 1 1 , 1982 



Mi^lMi 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



Classified Ads 



PNbHcHMring 



MMfeNMf^g 



hibNcHMrliif 



Public Htaring 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 



Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the Qty Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the Qty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, cm McHiday, Aiigust 
23, 1982, at 7:00 P.M., at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Applicaticm of Hunt Ccmtractitig 
Co., Inc., for a Change of Zoning EXstrict Gassificati(Xi 
from R-5 Residential EXstrict to R-8 Residential EMstrict 
on certain prc^rtylocated on the North side of 
Pariament Drive beginning at a point 400 feet more «- 
less West of Yoder Lane, running a distance of 600 feet 
more or less along the North side of Parliment Drive, 
running a distance of 72.47 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 63.43 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 513.21 feet alaig the 
Western property line, running a distance of 693.15 
feet along the Northern property line and running a 
distance of 838.69 feet along the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 11.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: / , 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of W. M. Gunter for 
a Conditional Use Permit for landfill on certain property 
located at 1105 Seaboard Road, running a distance of 
872 feet more or less along the West side of Seaboard 
Road, running a distance of 786.43 feet in a 
Southwesterly directiai, running a distance of 935 feet 
in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
1432.70 feet alcMig the Western prc^rty line and 
running a distance of 1184.44 feet alcmg the Northern 

' property line. Said parcel contains 39.9 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of C. B. K., Inc., for 
a Conditional Use Permit for an automobile and small 
engine repair establishment on certain property located 
on the South side of South Witchduck Road beginning a 
point 130 feet more or less West of Independence 
Boulevard, running a distance of 95 feet more or less 
along the South side of South Witchduck Road, running 
a distance of 95 feet more or less along the Scnith side of 
South Witchduck Road, running a distance of 190.84, 
feet along the Western prcq)erty line, runi^ing ar 
distance of 77.09 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 35.33 feet in a Northerly 
direction, running a distance of 6.70 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 17 feet in a Ncxitherly 
direction, running a distance of 6.70 feet in an Easterly 
direction and running a distance of 156^41 feet in a 
Northerly directicMj. Said , parcel, <;qip*^i»S/^l^,{^W*4i 

, square feet. BAYSUMBptpUGH- .»t« »*UI mibnt 
AMENDMENTS: ..:•;.;■.) -.•.■„,..,.■..,. 

4. Motion of the Planning Ccwnmissiion ef the Qty Of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, toamend and tecfdaih Article 
1, Section 105 of the Ccxnprehensive Zoning 0[^s^!i^.. 
pertaining to nonconfcH-ming use&,i i M<xe detailed 
information is available in the Department of Phmning. 

5. Motion of the Planning Commission Of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reOTdain 
Sections 4.4(b) and 4.4(j) of the Subdivision Ordinance 
pertaining to nonconforming lots. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

6. Motion of the Planning Department Commission of 
the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and' 
reordain Article 4, Section 401(c) of the Cranprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance Ordinance pertaining to shelter for 
farm •employees. More detailed infbrmati(m is 
available in the Department of Planning. 

7. Moticm of the Planning Ccxnmission of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain 
Article 2, Section 233 of the CcMnprehcnsive Zxmmg 
Ordinance pertaining to shelter fw farm employees. 
More detailed information is available in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. 

Plats with more detailed infcM-maticm are available in 

the Department of Plaiming, 

All interested perstMis are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Qerk 

157-6 

2T 

8/11 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will 
ccxiduct a Public Hearing cm Wednesday, August 18, 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the C«incil Chambers of the Qty 
Hall BuUding, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. Tlie staff brieing will be at 7:00 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Roan. The fdlowing 
applications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . David S. Winn requests a variance to allow parking 
of maj(»- recreatimal equipment in front of a buUding 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 1, Seoion 1. Eastern 
Park, 2968 N. Lynnhaven Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. Thomas D. IHippas Requests a variance (tf 2.8 feet to 
a 7.2 foot side yard setback (west side) inste^l of 10 
feet as required (seccmd story ^iditioi) on Lot 4, Block 
17, Shadowlawn (lights, 408 Nafdk Avenue. Vu-ginia 
Beach B«'Ough. 

3. Frank V. Park requests a variance (tf 8 feet to a 2 foot 
side yard setback (north side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (accessory building - garage) on Lot 31, Block 
2. Section 5, Aragona Village, 720 Brinson Areh. 
Bayside Bo-ough. 

4. Geo-ge R. I^tillo requests a variaiKX at 5 feet to a S 
foot rear and side yard setbacks (north skle) instead (tf 
10 feet each as required (swimminf ptxA) on Lot 18, 
Block B. Phase 3, Part A Ou^im HaU. 1061 
Kemps ville Bead. KemiMville Bomih. 

5. Ingram J. and Marie M. Benson ivqi^st a variaiKx 
of 5 feet to a 3 foot side yard setbKfc (east tide) mtud 
of 8 feet u required (second floor deck) on Lot 16, Block 
7, (Aermeer, 103A 57th Street. Ly^aiwa Bons^. 

6. -Mury J. Tennirn requests a varUuee ottt^ to a 9 
foot sMe yaid wljaMM to a street (JeauM ftreet) 
tasted et 15 Am as re<|ittr»l (steps bkI dec^ ori Lei 1, 



Block 40, Section R. Pembrc^ Manor, 400 Betsy Ross 
Road, fiiayside Borough. 

7. William Castle requests a variance of 17 feet to a 13 
foot firc«t yard setback instead of 30 feet as required 
(deck) cm Lot 12, Block 13, Diamond Springs Hcmies, 
5608 Odessa Drive. Bayside Borough. 

8. Arthur J. Zachary requests a variance of 7 feet to a 
13 foot side yard setback (west side) instead of 20 feet 
as required (deck and steps) on Lot 33, Prc^rty of L 
H. Peterson, Birdneck Point, 796 Oriole Drive. 
Lynnhaven Bcwough. 

9. Jesse £^. Veazey requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height toa 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required front yard setback (Breezy Point 
Road) on Lot 15, Block G, Section 7, Uke Placid, 1960 
DecathlCKi Drive. Princess Aime Borough. 

10. Jdin T. Atkinson requests a variance of 22 feet to 
an 8 foot frcmt yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required and of 13 feet to a 12 foot side yard adjacent to 
a street (Atlantic Avenue) instead of 25 feet as required 
and of 6 feet to a 9 foot side yard setback (east side) 
instead of 15 feet as required cm Lot 12, Block 3, 
Ubermeer, 54th Street and Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhav- 
en BcH-ough. 

1 1 . L, Torgerson requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 

, (swimming pod) on Lot 3, Block A, Section 1 , StratfOTd 
Chase, 5109 Stratford Chase Drive. Kemps ville 
Borough. 

12. William E. and Beverly J. link request a variance 
of 6 f^et 8 inches to a 3 foot 4 inch side and rear yard 
setbacks (southeast comer) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (accessc»ry building - storage shed) <xi Lot 166, 
Section 1, Westmoreland Estates, 3533 Hilber Street. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

13. Thomas P. Canncm requests a variance of 5 feet 6 
inches to a 4 foot 6 inch side yard setback (west side) 
and of 1 foot 2 inches to 8 foot 10 inch rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet each as required (accessory building - 
storage shed) on Lot 167, Section 1, Westmoreland 
Estates, 3537 Hilber Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

14. Richard L Vetra requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 
foot side and rear yard setbacks (northwest comer) 
instead of 10 feet each as required (through. lot - 
swimming pool) on Lot 738, Sectigoll, MaUbu^ .02 E. 
Coral Key. Lynhaven Borough. 

16. Thomas C. Broyles requests a variance of I^fecf to 
a 3 foot rear yard setback instead of 15 feet as required 
on 1^.3, Lake Shore Park, 704 Qystal Lake. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

,17. C, H. Byler and Stanley Willner d/b/a B & W 
recjdest k variance to allow a perimeter driveway in the 

, required 10 foot setback where prohibited when a 
ccnnmercial zoning district adj<»ns a rcSidtmii^'dl^trhit 

:. and to waive the required screening and landscaping in 
this setbiick on Lots 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30. Sectjc^<,2, 
Boulevard Manor. Virginia Beach Boulevard. Bayside 

>■ BcM'OUgh. -ii^liKj m<iftttbt.urmm 

1. Texaco, Inc., by M. C Criscitiello requests a 
variance of 16!^ square feet of sign area to 375 square 
feet of sign area instead of 212 square feet as attowed 

/ ,on Parcels ^F4D and F4B, ftirkway Shopping Center, 
Green Run« Ccvner of Lynnhaven Parkway and Dahlia 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

2. Allan and Susan Doan request a vaiatide of 22 feet to 
a 28> foot front yard setback instead of 56 feet as 
required (deck addition) on Lot 15. Ncxth Area, Secticxi 
1 , S^brj^ge Beach, 2216 Sandfiddler Road. Princess 
Anne Bcx-ough. 

3. David L Thompscm requests a variance of 1 .8 feet to 
an 8.2 fcxM side yard setback (east side) instead of fO 
feet as required (residential addition - gaiige) on iM 
3C, Parcel C, Subdivisicm #3, Baylake Pines, 4076 
Shore Drive. Bayside Borough. 

4. \ Susan L and William E. Hinton, II request a 
Van^nce of 6.5 feet to a 3.5 foot side yard setback (south 
side)) instead of 10 feet as required (deck) cm Lots 5 and 
% Block 13, Section G, Cape Henry, 2273 Kendall 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPUCANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 



Index Of Pt>st Classifieds 



i.i 

2.PtrMMl> 
3.LMtftFotmd 
4.Aiito« 
5.TnMkt 

•.VMM 

7. MctorcyelM 
•.iMtS 

10.IMpWmt«4 

il.PMitlMltWMtatf 

12. lasiMst Opportimity 

13.Nts 

14IJ«Mtwk 

!«• ApiHMMis 

M.ArtlclMForSal« 

IT.FiifiiitHr* 

li. ARtiVIM 

IS.Mcydts 

20. MwicallmtniiMiits 

21.T«iwisl0R/St«rM 

22.lt«tlry 

23. C«im/SlMV*/iMkMM 

24.Wmtt4T«l«y 

2S.6M41Miiptobt 

2S. EiitwIilnMtiit 

27.6anft/YariSalM 

2I.Flr«wM4 

29.UwiiAQani«n 

30. Farm EquiiMitflt 



31. liitimw E«ripiiMiit 

32.liisimuFtrllMt 

33. AvartniMtt Fw iMt 

34.RoMiitFM'lMt 

3S. Nmnti Fw Rant 

36.RtalEttat« 

37 Ut« For fate 

3t.M»hittN«Mt 

3t. PraftttiaMl SarvitM 

40. Strvleti 

41. Carpairtry 
42.ClilWC«rt 

43, CMcratt/MasMiry 
44.llMtrical 
4S.btwiiihwtli« 
4C. FiraplacM 

47. 1101119 iRiprOVMIMt 

40. l^tmctiMi/EAicatiM 
4f.MovlH|iNaiiniig 
SO. Mmlc LntMi 
SI Paintlni 

52. nMtognphy 

53. nana Timiiig/Rapair 

54. RtfrigaratiM 

H. RMM^tHng/Oacanthig 

56. Sawing & Aitaratiam 

57. Sotar Enarfy 
St. Tai Sarvtea 

SO. EMiiy Camarvatian 
SO. Nlscallaaaaai 



4.A«lM 



•.iMto 



]] 



DODGE-mi, Colt DeluM. GLAD8TONE-16 foot, with 



1. 



4.AHtM 



am/An tterao, 4-upttd twin 
itick, reelinini teatt, plus 
num. '4300 Mfotiabk. Call 
42M«74. 

4-4T-g. l 

rOK SALE-1971 Chevrolet 
Moaza. 4-ipeed, air con- 
ditioning, AM/FM 8-track, 
New Urn, v»y good condition. 
•3.000. Ptenc 412-1043. 

±£[±l 

JEEF-Oovernment Surplus 
lUted for ^S.^. Sold fw 
•44.00 for infonnation call !• 
312-93M961 ext. 1447. 

4-4T-9- 1 

MAZDA-OLC, 197g, S door, 
autOHMtic, AM/FM, air, ex- 
ceUent condition. •2793. CaU 
g37-498I. 
4-4T-9- 1 

OLOSMOUI.E-1977, Toro- 
nado Brougham excellent con- 
dition. All power, am-fm, 8- 
track stereo. C^ 833-7768. 

HT-H8 

BlflCK-1973. Regal, 2 door, 
new muffler, tail pipe and dm- 
ng chain, •lOOO negotiable. 
CaU 490^2132. 
4-4T-8-23 

1971 OUM CNCINE - 330 cubic 

indi. Exoaileitf condition. ^230. 
347-7643. 

4TFN 



Johnsons 100 horse power 
motor. >830. Call 482-1236. 
8-4T-g-2 3 

LARSON- is foot, V-6 engine, 
OMC, 1/0, Cox tilt trailer, 
skiing or rishing. has new stalr- 
ter, alternator, voltage 
regulator, carborator, ignition 
switdi, stem drive, and water 
pump completely rebuilt. 
•2300 or best offer. Call 485- 
1031. 

8-4T-9-1 



IJ 



APACHE MASA - AH 

fiberglass pop u|>. Excellent 
condition. Forced air furnace, 
gas, electric, running water, 
sleeps 6, insulated, electric 
brakes. Must sell. Sl,600. Ex- 
tra will be thrown in. Call 623- 
5827. 

"-4T-8/25 



10.HtlpWii|tod 



LIFE AFTER LIFE- 

^Introductory program. August 
21, 1982, at the Virginia Beach 
Pavilion at i0r30 a.m. Spon- 
sored as a Public Service by 
ECKANKAR. Call 480-0661. 
1-21-8-1 8 

CUPID STUPID?-Let us find 
your mate or date. Sent '2 for 
information to P.O. Box 9323, 
Norfolk, VA 23303. 
HT-?-18 

HOUSESnnaS - christian 
married coupte available sUu- 
ting in Seplemlicr. Bonded, 
references awaflaUe. Omiact 
us at 1-616-073-2857. 

1-4T-8/1I 

1 ' > > . ' I 



'2. ron— all 



ifcREDrt PROBLEMS7- 

Receiv^' Mastercard or Visa 

<>^ith no credit check. Chiiran- 

-^fced. IFOr. free brochure, call 

f ?Hou$e of Credit, TOLL FREE 

l-80&442il'53i iiiytay. • 

' - 2.4T-g.lg 

CREim- PkOBLlMSr Receive a 
Mastercard or Visa with no 
credit che<;k. Ouaranteed. For 
free brochure, call House of 
Credit, TOLL FREE 1-800-442- 
i531anytime. 
24T8-18 

WAN1ia>t UNUBLAL Ideas 
on any subject for publication tai 
book form. Share appor- 
tionately in royalties rtoived 
over an extended period of time. 
No investment necessary. 
C.O.I. . P.O. Box 5054, 
Chesapeake, Va. 23324. 

2-10T-9/15 



^ 



VOLKSWAGON-196S, beauti- 
ful, 34 miles to the gallon. 
•930. Qtll 483-3621. 
44T-8-2 3 

PONTIAC-1974, Grandville, 
new tires, new exhaust system, 
new battoy, new water piunp 
and new ignition system. Very 
tood condition. '700. Call 
347-1673 any time. 
44T-823 

VOLKSWAGON-1978, Con- 
vertable, air, am/fm stereo, ex- 
cellent comfition, only 40,000 
mUes, '7,000. Call 421-9723. 
44T-8-23 

CADILLAC-1973 Fleetwood 
Broughall. 4 door, tilt whed, 
split beach seats with 6 way 
power, am/fiDn 8 track stereo, 
dectric antesma. plus much 
mora. '11,293. Call 343-7880 
for more Infonnadoo anytime. 

44f^-25 

-fit I r, .11- ..< i nu i t iTT ,, 

DATBtlN • 1913. 240Z. 4 
speed. AMvTM radio. Eair 
condition. Call 623-1191 
before 12 noon and any tmie 
weekends. 

____^ 44T-8/23 

THUi4dERBIK0 — 1976, 
white on white, loaded, good 
condition. S2300. Call 423- 
7675. 

4-4T-8/2 3 

MGB-1967, Classic, conver- 
table, spoke wheels like new, 
back speakers, new seats, ex- 
cdlent condition. CaU Debbie 
466-7278. 

HT-HO 

GALAXY FORD-1968, Good 
Condition. •700 cash. Call 
467-5081. 

4-4T-K-I8 



5. Track* 



FOKO-1966 pick-up 
Econoline, new tires, air con- 
ditioning, very dependable. 
•330. OUl 347-1673 anytime. 
3-4T-8-23 



7. 



79 HONDA GL IMO-Black 
with gold trim. Comi^aietour 
kit. AM/FM stereo radio A 
cassetu upe player. Qidae 
contnri garage k^. 11,300 
miles •3,300. CaU 3474413. in- 
ters p.m. 

' 7-TFN 

YAMAilA-1979, 750 spaoial, 
red tear drop tankislow 
mileage. •i40o: CaU anvtitM 
423-SS3f. '^ 



SALES REPRESENTATIVE- 

Commission, ideal part time 
situation. Regional distributor 
of Satellite TV Antennaes, 
need ambitious local represen- 
tative to market this entertain- 
ment system. Call l'804-788- 
8193. 
yMT-8-1 8 

INSURANCE AGENTS- 

Liceased Agents, Lilie. Health. 
Accidents, up-front Annualized 
commisaons, weekly payday, 
no ddrit, unlimited territory: 
Large comiMuiies cxpaa^r^ m 
this' area need 2 agents, 
Muljple ivoducts, aimuities, 
and IRA's; If ^ou are noit nr- 
ning, •600 plus perMweek airid 
you iare willint torworE, send 
resufw to: Insurance In- 
vestprs, i2l>%\i!Sliiiiirslde 

Driw, MmmimnA, yAa 

234411 « 

| - lOlT-8- 4 

HELP '^kM-M i AJaffli) 
groigid help wanted. Spring and 

accepted for our registration 
desk, stores, swimming pools, 



7.-4T.4/n , 



> f 



■bBiMB 



4* 



MOnnCYCU ■ '74 Hottia , „ -,- 

airy Itftru ' TSuWdl^t ^6lday 
•Twvel Park, 1075 Genera:^ Booth 
i^d.. VirgiQia.<|H^V caU 
4a#-0249. .. ,..«>#:' ,.. 

WBLT WANTEBk-litpviy in- 
Sttttation personnel needed. 
Male or fisnt^e, stitdeqt% 
wJefcraie. dill after 8 p.m. 
daily 497-«i8Bor499-1051 . 

■ 10-4T-g-1 8 

6 LA0IES >rEa>ED - for sales 
work. Car necessary, flexable 
hours. Ideal for young mothers. 
Earn excellent profits. Call 499- 
6734. 

to TEN 



SAIL BOAT • CoroMde. 23 
foot, 2 sails. 7.3 Mercury eiec- 
irk start outboard, fuU gaUey. 
Heaps 3. raUer n^ag boom, 
anidl US Coaat Guard raqaired 
equipment, many extras. 
S9300. Call 488-4204. 
8-4T-8/25 

BOAT • UVt fibcqtan. 33 I9 
Evinnuk motor, witii trailer. 
AU for S1300 negotiable. CaU 
463-4330 

8-4T-8/11 



W. L Towers 

Secretary 

157-9 

2T 

8/11 VB 



iMokkig for a way toattraci attanthn? 

LASSIFIEDS! 



/ 



hMkABCtiom 



NMcAHcdMS 



An ad in the Classifieds makes a big 
m^e . . . your message reaches more 
peiiple more olten 
for less money! 



TAKE-NOnCE that on 
Aug(fcrt20, 1982 at 10:00 
a.m. at the premises of 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
31S2 Virginia Beach Boul- 
evard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23452, The ui«i- 
ersigned will sell M pubUc 
auction, for cash, reserv- 
ing unto itself the right to 



bid, the following motor 

vehicles: Description, 

1981 Chevrolet C^maro; 

Serial#, 1G1AP87K8BN- 

122755. 

Hcte water finports, Inc. 

E. C. Rice-Comptrdler 

IT 

8/11 VB 

157-11 



Alpha Xi 
Holds Meeting 



Preceptor Alpha JQ Ch^ter ci Beu Sigma Ru will 
l»ve its monthly summer meetii^ at the tooe of Owen 
St^, 533 WilUamsbiu-g Road, M 7:30 p.m. on 
Thursday, ^igust 5. 

Final distribution Of {nuoeeds from the amual 
Qicfcet on the Hearth Graft 9iow for the desi^i^ 
scTvkx |Mt9e(^, C^tk Fltaraate C&fe aad Dnif 
Missionary Own^wiO be ^d^d. Mtov^atwmbt 
revealed far Bcgh^^ D^ m Augwt &. 

^ter the boamess awet^, refrvshiMnts wiD be 
servwl Md ^nabert are nM U> 1^^ their bat^^ 
sufcs far a i^p ■ te pod. 




iMicn yoy waiM mmAs, k>ok to tfic Oa^teA . . . this market than any other medium around. The 

^fiBu% be n^ieitf. When you're serious about Classifieds . . . they're your sure-fire advertisit^ 

fetting the lob done, place a quick call to one of medium. Whether you're buying or selling suc- 

our friendly ad takers. When you place your ad «Mful campaigns start with an ad in the Classifieds, 
mth us you'll reach more potenttaf customers In 

CALL 



Ask For Robin 



486-3430 



I 

i 

I 

i 

I 

I 

I 

i 

I 

I 

I 

I 

! 

f 

I 

I 

I 

i 

I 

I 

I 

t 

i 

i 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



Vk^ni* Beach &iB,Aiifiiftl 1,1^2 IS 



Classified Ads 



I 



*^ 



10.IMpWmM 



13. Nit 



m9m HPpNMwv* 



it.Ai1iclMFM-trit 



17, 



29> Lnw&fianMi 



HOUSEKEEPER . Uve-in. 
Sslary and room and bowd for 
mature tingle adult. Non- 
smote. CaB 420-3600. 
— : "MT-a/n 

HELP 11 -9 year old needs 
•omcone nice who does not 
holler to take care of me at my 
house when mom and dad to to 
work. Houn vary fhnn 6 a.m. 
to I a.m. and 3 p.m. to 3 p.m. 
0014164311 «Fte 10:30«.m. 
iO-4T-9-l 



tLNtWrnsWiNM 



PETS-Pkase help us by giviag 
a loving pet a home. We are a 
non-profit orgai^zati<», but 
we will gkdly lake donation. 
We are in need of Foster Parcn- 
U for our pets. Please call ^7- 
7630, 481-6634 or 39H321 if 
you can help. Animal 
Assistance League. 

13-1?N 

■EAGLE PUPS-Pure blood 
pups, 7 weda aid, no AKC. 
Oood for hunters or pets. 
Femala '30. males '60. Qdl 
347-2U3 or 347-2933 after i 
p.m. 

13-4T-8-18 



OrrKX WCHtK-MatuK. weU 

qualified lady with excdlent 
work history and references, 
desire , permanent part-time 
emirioyment. Areas of par- 
ticular interest-STOCK 
BROKEllAOE-LAW, MEDI- 
CAL, REALESTATB. IN- 
SURANCE and MOTEL OF- 
FICES-Beach area only, 
none 467-9661. 
U-4T-9- 1 

CARETAan-I^ofcasional 
couple. Any area. Call 1-804- 
232-7341. 

11-4T-8-18 



c^ 



15. 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
393 Priividcnct IM. 



CALL 464-9317 



WASHER-Kounore, very 

good condition, '123. Dryer, 

Kenmore, very good oonditioa. 

•123. 

»^T-«-23 

WASHING MACHINE-Need 

tim»,'SO. Call anytime. 464- , 

3694. 

13-4T-9- 1 

REFRIGERATOR-1 side by 
side '193. 1 two door •183. 2 
air conditioners, MOO' RTU. 
nX and 18.000. •183. Ken. ' 
more washer *83, Amana 
Fteeser'163. CaU388-l(»4. 

13-4T-8-23 

, ' — I 

TEST 4 POST^iOi^aton-Style 
Queen -»iw" bed, ^oWd 
mahogany, hand carved bj^ ^ 
mast» furniture makers; Ckii- 
of a kind, 'SSOO. Mwy other 
items inchMUng antiques iad 
Persian suirmy runner. Cill 
855-0171. 

KING SIZE-Witeilied, ram- 
plete, nis: l^LAIiek lO-'^peW" 
bike, '83. Crf42M036r ' 

l«ifP-8M5 



AIR <X}NDniONEilS-4,000 

BTU's to 22,000 BTU's. AB 
reconditimied. '133 to '233. 
Cdl anytime 468-2828. 

13-4T-9- 1 

CARPET-ir X 21'. light 
green, thick, short shag. '200. 
Call 467-9704. 
■ __. 15-4T-9- 1 

WASHING MACHINE-and 

refti^vtor. good condition. 
CaO 488-9639. 

. I3-IT-8-1 1 

H0-Sears. etectric adjusta- 
fle% «(cd^t condition, '330. 
Adifa« machine. Olivetti Un- 

irood, good conditicm, '33. 
auble bed rails, *30. CaU 

4310after3p.m: 

< lfr4T-8-23 

BROTHER SEWING 

MACHINE-with cabinet, ex- 
cellent condition. *«0. Call af- 
ter S p.m. 483-9422. 

i 16-4T-8-I1 

i r-^ ■ 



FCNe£-l30 fe^i tingle gate, 
metal polcf iiKludml, like new. 
CMU 440-9433. 

16-1T-8-1 I 

MICRO WAVE TV-Antesna. 
never used, 1st run movfea. 
Wm ship out of state. '133. 
CaU 1-804-463-0366. 
16-1T-8-1 1 

REFR1GERATOR-$230. 

XLIOO motorcycle. '273. Call 
460^r793. 

' 16-4T-9- 1 

STEREO-Maple twin beds. 

chair, and table. Pli» many 

other miscellaneous items. CaU 

340-3380. 

Ifrlt-M l 

BABY ITEMS • Low prices on 
new and used cribs, car seats. 
play pens, high chairs and 
mwe. At the Baby's Room, 
buy, sell, trade: Virginia Beach 
Blvd. and Gmt Nedc Road. 
(Near Western Aulo.) Call 4S6- 
6344. 

, 16-4T-8/H 



COUCH AND CHjUn-Oreen 

plaid, inrly Aiae&an, A-l 
co»tt|()si.*200. SterwandTV 
stand, •lO.CUSlMTti*. 

■17-4T-9-I 






AKlKfiM PIANO - MMSt seU, 
wnately carved square grand 
iriano. Patemed date, 1862. Ex- 
cellent condition, '3.000. CaU 
467-0466. 
I8»r8-I8 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. , Cloisonne 
necklaees; Vasesseod Boxes. 1804 
granby St., 623-91 19. Ddfy 10-3. 
18TTN 



JOYNER PROPKSiONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Frecesdmata. 343-^49. 

, t9rtH 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark har- 
dwood, truckload, any size. 
I^otcct your shrubs. Oct now 
«^k olMale. We ddiver in one 
day. 833-0230 or 833-7467. 

29TFN 



31. 



It. 



•BSXAiWANT EQUIP- 

MENT-a4«v-Rec(Midlti0Md) 
aundics and parts. "W^ acr- 
vicc what we sdl," Dixie 
Equipment Company, 316 
West 21st Street, Norfolk 
^giqia 23317. 623-7073. 

31-4T-S-t» 



6.ArticlMForSdt 



^vr- 



17. 



HUIFY 15 8PPIM2) bikes, 
mens light blue, 26-iadi, one 
year old, very g«od condition, 
163. One in excellent cowfition 
f70. Call 481-0749. 

19^Idl-18 



32. ImImss Far iMil 



It 



modeling Repla^p-j „ 



Reinode.._« — «-— n'-o 
menj, Windows. Any 
Type of ' Iffliwovenieiits, 

titttumtm.''""' 



mS^'^^i: 



SO||eCO 40 Channdl CB with 
rempvable microphone, anten- 
nacland indoor power pack, 
, S73<|sKfitaciett tools, surface 
gauge, telescoping gauges, 
3.16" - 2W", 0.1" 
miCTometo^, S73..for all. Call 
399-0816. 

: lfr4T-8//ll 

ART TABLE - director chair 
and lamp, all like new. $230 
for all. Call42^9424. 

16-4T-8/11 

WATER SOFTNER- Meadow 
Brook, perfect condition. 
$150.00 Call 547-5779. 
1 ^ lfr4T-8/ll 

<^LF CLUBS - Mens. Walter 
Hagen. Ultra 11, Irons 2 thru 
sandWedge,, Woods 1, 3 - 3. 
Leather bagt head covers. Ex- 

I ceilent condidoa, $300. 480- 

,2872,388-2340. 

,m..,i lfr4T-8/ll 



'i n ,mn 



BuUdtng or Rii|liUred, Yb^ Need 

BLAei^ - 

BROS.-- 



'TprM p? Calvin 




^>ccialisit,v'".!";,.,.,',M"'. 
t Rifling Coiimcfor • Roofa * Ggporti •Gtngts 
f Buih lUmodded • Room AMMdm " 
• Aluminum SMIi^ • Kitchen Remodfcfed 

545-7318 

HagkE.nKli,8r. 



OH i 



)i 



Own your own Jemi' 
'Sport^swear, (nfant-< 
Pretieen 'x>t Ladies Ap- 
paref Store. Otferihg all 
nati^l^ itiflown t>rai|ds 
sucl^|j^..|^rto|f, Ciuq. 
Lce^^tf,^^ Vanderbilt, 
"ilvin jn^; Wrangler 
ovei^2^^aii<rS; V,fVi; 
to l^^!^i|c1udes b<^- 
— LX^n4,,in^^ntory, airfare 
pr one to Fashion Cen- 
ier , I training, fixtures , 
graj^i, op,ening 

proiii^bktns. 

Qdllfri Kogtccky 
(501) 327-3031 
■■"■'■-Ti-- 



LIVING ROOM SUITE-4 

{riece herculon set. *423. CaU 
423-7923. 

17-CT-8-18 

LEAVING AREA-Modular 
tO-piece living rdom suite, 1 
year old, ewdlant comtttion, 
•600 or best offer. Black and 
white 10" TV, '30 « beat of- 
fer. CaU 387-4712. 
I7-1T-8-1 1 

FURNltURE-Frencb Provin- 
cial living room suite, odd 
chair, matches living room set. 
AU good condition. Best offer. 
CaU 487-4978. 
17-lt-8-l l 

FURNITURE-Bookcase, matr , 
tress, boxspring, (tffice eiiairs, 
appliances, draser, dinette set, 
end ubles, m^ble top .coffee, 
ubie, s^ ft^. bed*. iniaQ 
enamel. tairte)|4 lamps, rviawnm 
cleaner. , L*{^Kett4<;^Qics area. 
Call623-0693. : 

' ' ^ ' 17-4T-9- 1 

Mty i l l KRA NEAN-BBata&m 
suifls 3 piece, atpi fcifciaft with 
'mittot,-^ub l e d ra saa ri -bed- 
; with he«dj)^,^9^^taf(|s. 
•690 9r,H,<.^,,(9#464j 
2350affff,5;J|0. ,,..,,03 .,,.,-. -,n 



A^ws ^^HO^^W^OW ■Mv^w ^^^W^^WwW 



YIOUN-Made in G«many, 
"mid 1800*s, soft tone, perfect 
for intimate setting or stwfcnt 
home use. >400. Call 499- 
1842 after 6 p.m. 

^ ao-4T-»- i 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 

'Sale - New and used pianoa, 
organs, guitars, amps, drums, 
PA systems, riectric pianoc A 
, guitar effects. Symphony 
Music, 481-1391, 

20-rr4/ll 



OUTSTANDING OPPOR- 
TUNITY-In solar heating 
business. High profit. 
Kfinimuffl investment '14,000. 
Call 423-7792. 
32-4t-«-» 

LOUNGE FOR SA1£-'23,000 
and assume, serious inquiiies 
only, call 427-6621. 

33-4T-8^a3 



21.T«livillM/StirM 



GIANT SCREEN TV theater 
size - TV projection systqn, 
'-^iconverts any TV into 8 foot ' 
' < "picture. Oreat 'fot- cable, spor- 
' ts. $29.93. Dealer wanted. 
CaU 845-2393. V, ^ , , 

: 2HT-I/>M. 



TO 3804b PRonrn- 

Wholesale w retaU over 2S00 

items. Dealers urgently 

needed. Free details. Write: 

Southside Distributors, P.o! 

Box 1076. FrankUn VA 23831- 

1076. 

32-2T-H8 

STORES AND STORAGE 
AREAS - An sizes. Properties 
unlimited. Marvin Goidfarb. 
399-8390.484.1273. 

32TFN 



33. 



F«rRMt 



■ i'> i 



M.WaM«IT»liqf 

to I rj i l iiji j i j i 



IJIl i l I .1.111( 1 i ] i 



g RENTAL' JMCMPERTY Wan- 
gled -JiooUi^ for a tow down 
^lipaymoit and assume. Call 424- 
.t,",y<i after 6:00 p.m. and 

3 PIECE S01#9» ylEAHWO©* s ; -; 24^47U - 







Setting, raiting or hiring? ' 

SNm/P^ di^fieds are the ^stifi^r 



w^ 



^s 






PUkx ym low cost, quicli airtifli ciMSiru44^ 
today. Call 486-3430 or mail die hiiHrc^l^ny 
We're here to help you wtthyoiu- ad: -*' *^ ' 

70 worts or kss, 1 week, only »4.00-4 weeks, 
mdy 12.00 (The fourth week is free): Your 1^ wiU 
run in ewdi iaue of the Virginia Beach.Sia and 
CSicsapeakePost. 



Stereo'Ci^Mt^ 83" long, tots o« 
storage space for tapes and 
recprds- Hfa.^^x ( ((^.|<^«d 
tape deck, ,an^ Sony receiver 
SR6030, 30 w^s per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers., SP2000. Space 
in cabinetvfor tuqUable. ,AU for 
•800. Call 388-5811. 

17TFN 

I I 1 1 ill l i l il nf i 'i I I ■ < l I 



CASK^UklD -'VifsiaiaBc^ch 
Antigw;C»'P!iy»t»^ for •»- 
' Qqu^;,.ol4 fufnil^t*, .clwks. 
glassware, huhps, china, oil pain- 
tings, orioital t^, old.^tm apd 
'aiOique to^^'W<% Wy one; piece 
or entire ItohsefuUs. Also, good, 
ised' ftiitAi&e. Can 422-4477' 
between S'A.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS ^ - Great Bridge- 4 
1bcdtlti&. one ind 1 bedroom 
UiM^r^Mtot^- Ffont '260. Reatct 
<«{fioe^ 492-3373. eveniap 48^ 
1492. 369 Johnstown fload. 

.;■'. " ', ; .■33TFN 

CRE^^HR^.,,ARMti, 
JIVING i^ear Oeeana A Dam 
Neci/. 1..2 A, 3 bedroom apts.. 
' fUsd ^iowiihoiises with private 
patios, swiinmirtf pool and tcn- 
irfs 'coi^s: Short terra lease 
ihrailabtel MeM and hot water in- 
cluded. Rents start at '320. The 
rii|es.4«r»XI0. 

33TFN 



JV. rmvnNMf vfrVim 



NOW OPEN! 



Tidewater Trading Center 
1435 Baliibridge Blvd. 

Chraapeake, VirgiBla 

Auctions, Buying, Selling, Promotions, 
.\ntiqa« Wanted- Consi^uiieiitt Accepted. 
t How Raiting laiop^ce. 

j^. J^ 'AactlMS Every WMtnodi^rEvcBiip at 7:30 P.M. 
Di^ 54^2166 397-^49; N^hts 428-2028 



23. Eafaftsiaawat 



WOK. SAlMrTO teUroom dance 
lessons. GaU Larry Dunn for 
m«c infmaation 480-2134. 

26-TFN 



BACK RIIMNG ■ Circle 

¥ Ranch. 2013 Salem Road. 
Initfnia Beach. CaO 495-3262 
'^K mme information. 

2612T8-11 






MyOaMlflledAd 



^»^ 



-**- 



at. 




'J 



OPVMMl 



a 



MUMt 



Pleite run ad for ( ) 1 w«^, ( ) 4 weeks or ( } 
tt^ gtcqpqped. C(Mt Ig •12.00 for 4^weelu tw first 
in^ds, ^ for e ac h a d d iti w ial ixmt. 



NMie. 




¥^om. 



F.O.^^^ 1»^ 




I 
I 
1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

1 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



with 
have 
why not 



/ ATTENTION 

/ |i Serious Job Seekers! 

/Wotod you like to set your own hours 
prTCtically no limit on earnings and 
ii^^eations as ctesired? If so., the 
ebnveniently work with us ^rtio^^bundiing 

ifauul. R«:eive work and pa^^fflts^hy auul. 

•. Start immediately! For inforination, a 
self addressed, stamped envelope assures 
aproaiHrq}ly. 

Mail Marketing Services, 
P,O.Box2590,Oscala,BL 32678 



FRAN 
THE VINYL LADY 

R^AIB 

Fttmtture*Cars 

• Boats • ResUurana 

Roid^tia! a Commercial 

ALSO 

^Re-Upli^Mry • AiQf kiUcrial 

Dr^Ms • %)r«dl • CanTettav 

468-5227 



BdOKKEEPiNG-MontUjr 

balMce sheet. PAL, deUded 
trttl balance from your checks 
ai»l recdpts, stubs, or rcgteer 
tape*. 941's and VA-5's. Up 
to 200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; •43. Payables, 
receivable, small payroll. 
Chesapeake only. CaU 420- 
6623. 
39-TFN 

BOOKING ^RVICE including 
quarterly paytoU reports and 
bank account reconciliation. 
^widaliTing in small pri^ireitor- 
ships. Pick up and ddivary. 
Retired professional. Qdl 420- 
5624. 

3»TFN 








South Drive-In Tl^atoe 

Flea^ark^ 

2501 OolpM^ Road 

Open 
£¥617 Satarday«.Sonday & Holidays 

7^A.ni.tod^ 
Ven^ra-ni^ 
Free spM» for ekwchcs §e M>n-profit or^wiatlou 

CiU 422-3624 9toS orM^-4i<ll 



raMrooMi 



SANDEK 

PAMfiMeoiiiuent 
420-9606 



SURROGATE WIFE will 
dean, cook, sh^, orter, run 
tiTUBOt, care for pbmtt and 
pets; ouretaker. Qualified wiUi 
references. CaUS«S-7806. 

39-4T4/1I 



5 



TYPING SERVICE - For 

boiiaesacs and individuals. 7 
days a «wk, IBM S^cUic. 
Raasonable rates. CaU either 
467.7112, Kempsville vea. ^ot 
4634236. Htlltiv/Panto^e ar- 
ea. 

' 40TP N 

BOOKKEEPER - Will do bobks 
in my home. Bxperiencec in 
payreol and quart«ly returns. 
Pick-up and delivery service. 
CaB 543-4096 after 3 p.m. Tor 
more iafcHrmttion and rates. 

40TFH 



4i.Carp«rinr 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING, 
ROOFING • and aU^^types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
structioD. 4204433. 

4ITFN 



42. OM Cart 



CHILD CARE-My liome. 
Tidewater and CroBwdl Road. 
Fenced yard, toddlers 
preferred. 2 playrooms, 
nutritious meals and nacks 
provided. CaU 853-6820. 

42-4T-9- 1 

CHILD CARS-Charte*towa- 
Kempsville area. Mature 
depcadrtle person, eaperien- 
oad. I will take care (^ your 
children, idl aBCS in my home. 
Meal and snacks provided, 
playroom, fenced yard. 
Anytime. Weekly rttc. ^33. 2 
dtOdfesi •30, •! hourly rate for 
dr<9-ina. dt 495-1614. 

- 42^rr-9- i 

CHILDCARE-My home, any 
age. ^refte evenings, wffl serve 
snacks Ad meals. R easo n a b le 
rates. Oitt460-2S6. 

4a-lT-t-l l 

' N IMHWE DAY CAia Cen- 
'lar. tt4ln Btttr ana. '3' 
teachers, classes, field trips, 
manyaxtru. Rnuonabte rates, 
anyageaccq>ted. 424-7662. 

, 42-4T-8/1 1 

BABYVniNd. Mot^ of 5 
year ott. D^n, evenings, 
wMkaads. ftabed yard. ^Is 
in^nded. PiinccH Anne Plaza 
«na. CBB486-629SanytiiK. 
^a-^T-g/ii 

BABYarmNC • b my ex- 
perieiMBad hoase by the day or 
week, any i«e, fenced yard. 
Non^Bwaiea. 833^^3. 

42^T.8/11 
COUNTRY DAY CASE - Of- 
fcrii« qaiUitf p*-flchool and 
kinde^artaa programs. Call 
now about mir 'SUMMER 
FUN" program I Two 
locations. Green Run (427- 
1891) and Indian Lakes (467- 
8835). 

42-4T-8//11 



47. 



A-l AMNTION 

REMOIKUN&Oaraae con- 
versions, custom decks, 
r^airs. «c. PVee estimates. 
CaO anytime 463-«735. 

47-4T-8-23 



47. 



ADDITIONS. ROOMS- 

carpentry. roofing, siding, 
storm window, stcwm doors, 
plastoing, electric, concrete 
work, plumbing, guttering, 
i«nodeiing, kitchen and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluminum sidiiig, firplaces, 
caipedng painting, specmli^ng 
m parkin arns and driveways, 
dl type of demcAtion, free 
es'.;mate without obligation, 
prompt serviee. Serving all of 
Tidewater. Bonded and In- 
sured. SUte Registo^. Call 
623-7435. 623-6148. w 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 

WALLPAPERING - Beautiful 

interiors. Reasonable rates. 

No job too small. Call day or 

night. Free estimates. Call 

427-3813. 

47-4T-8/18 

WALL PAPER HANGER - 

I^ofesstonal work. Reasonable 
rates, go Imnd and hand with me. 
Ftee estimaes. large or small 
jobs. Call Keith after 5. 547- 
3764. 
47TFN 

ADDITIONS AND IM- 
PROVEMENTS - Dens, garages, 
kitchens, bathrooms, eta. 
(Quality work at reasonable rates. 
Free estimates and references 
furnished upon request. All work 
guaranteed by state licensed con- , 
tractor. Call Bill Monette, 481- 
2201. 
47TFN 

HOME REPAIRS - Additions, 
no middleman, licenses, lifetime 
resident of Virginia Beach. Class 
A remodeling, carpentry, 
masonry, etc. Plans drawn. 
Quality workmanship at 
reasonable prices. Guaranteed. 
No job too small. Call John 
Gaul, 11 at 464-4392 or 463-2287 
after 5:00 p.m. 
47 TFN 

AWNINGS, STORM WIN- 
DOWS, doors, patio covers, 
siding, guttering and fencing. 
Order now before the spring 
rush. American Awning Co., 
'4231 Portsmouth Blvd. 488- 
0000, . ' 

« 47 TFN 



I 



51. Pahiltag 



.LPAPERING AND^ ^ 

service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us foj a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- '- 

3478. 

51 TFN 

PAINTING - Large or small - 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commoxnal work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN . 



4 



5& »iRHil8lng/DacaratiaK 



I 



BATHROOM REMODEUNG - 

Old and ndw. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimates. 20 years experience in 
TidewatCT aru. Small and large 
jobs. Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

55TFN 



5S.SMrh«aAltMatiMn 



ADIMT10N8 - Rooms, garages, SEAMTRESS-The following 



convert garages, decks, etc. 
(Quality work by a licensed 
bidder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
231 1 anytime. 

47 TFN 



services are available; tailoring 
alt«ations, and or original 
design. By ^K>ointment only. 
Please call 398-9194. 

36-4T-8-25 



ATTENTION!! 

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 
FULLTIME EMPLOYMENT. CALL 547-2177, 

Mr. Hcplcr BETWEEN 8 & 9 AM. 



We want you to discover high quality, name 
brand fashions at reasonable prices!! To 
accomplish this we are offering you a very 
special bonus not available to the 
general public: 

Pres«it thia coupoii tmd recdve a special discount of 
efr the (msinal imce of any one item 
iTcm om mtat stock 



Vz 



—OFFER AVAILABLE AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS 

WILLNER'S 

C»U— iWe West 47th ^9^ Itorfolk, VA 
OmROOAND— 3130 We^n baadi tt%Nl.. CfteaHqiake. VA 
FAIRFmLD-^&4FfefrMd&opplntCett0, ru^^Beadi, VA 
PLAZAC»«~^8tl>^Stte»,»ferfoBt,VA 



■a 



i 

i 



^ 



wmmmmmm 



wm^mmmmmmmmimmm 



mmmmmm 



VIHBB 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, August 1 1 . 1982 



WELL 



WHAT DO I DO NOW! 







WE 




'T JUST LEAVE YOU 



WITH A TURNED ON MACHINE 



CUSTOMIZED 

COMPUTER 

SYSTEMS 





HARDWARE 

SOFTWARE 

CONSUUTNG 

SALES 

SERVICE 



Virginia Beach, Va. 23452, (804) 463-4001 



*-v. 



'** 



TheVirginia Beac 






ik 



Wiil Chairman BeM^i^ointed? 




woods' Fate In GouncilTHands 



ByOregOoldfarb 
Sun Bdtor 

Bay A. Woocb is ti» mm to the nkkUe. 

W(N3<dsi, a Virsinia Bexk StAxxi Board member 
since 19€^ ai^ its chairnraii since July, 1^, ti 
(»ught between a CSty CmnKal rHttRg ttniti^ the 
ntunber <tf ocnsecutiNe yewrs a baa^ itonbel fioay 
serve, and perscn^ suppaten who wish ta see 
the 68 y^r old ac^taucian continue to serve the 
dty's public Khool i^ton. 

"It's »fl> to Coundl, but I'd like to see him 
reappdnted," said scluxxl bowd vi<» cbalnsaB 
Robert H. CalUs, Jr. "I was on Qty CotincU 
before when lus iuo»e came up and I always 
supperted Umf^ wonM support htm again." 

Board membw John Va^ said "I would sup- 
port him, (Woods) to continue on if his term is 
continued. I think he is a good chairman.'* 



m 



At Msw is w^tte- at B^ O^ Council. wUsk 
imiMied the tenn Umita^xs, wBl »a^iaiQt 
Woods even though he hie ser^d the bolrd 
noiiit<v for 16 ^ars. Members serve three year 
terms, no mtw toan three in sw^^ssioo. Crftka 
chaiBetittt tl^ sciMd board Meds an in^K^on ci 
new Moed regularly to keep tlM city's public 
school system's pdicy makiiyii»oeedure healUiy. 
Thus the Coundl's reasdifesg fi» the tenure 
limitations, Ho««ver, if Cfty Council can make 
the riifa», it can also cftffi^e ^m. 

"If cauwO put the limttatiom in, I guess they 
can t^ them cut," said Ik. Fred O. Beiduun. 
assistant superintendent oi ftiMWgiJ serviixs. 
"Oty. Ccwndl can do anyting ft Bloes. They 
enacted the rule, they am change ft.'' 

Farmer mayor and {H'esent coMn^mnn J. 
Ifcnry McCoy, Jr.. i«rees wiA Benham, and 



doesn't like the ruling by Council on the pending 
schod board appdntments. 

"If he (Woods) is willing to serve we are not out 
of o-der to reappdnt him," McCoy said. "I don't 
know his feeHngs on it, but I would support 
Wood's renomination. He's a fine school board 
member. 

"You see, I didn't like the crdinance to begin 
with," the Kempsville councilman continued. "It 
allows a lot of good members to leave the board. ' ' 
board." 

Vice Mayor Barbara Henley, Pungo borough, 
on the other hand, thinks the term limitation is 
warranted. 

"I am not in fovor of changing the ordinance," 
she said. "I think the reasons we estiMHshed the 
ordinance are very vaUd, and I would need to hear \ 

See Woods Page 12 



Resident 
Fires At 
Planners 



By Lee Cahill 
' Sun Reporter 

A resident of Salem 
Woods has charged that 
the Virginia Beach Plan- 
ning Commission is not 
responsive to the people 
of the city. 

Steven Hepler , tdd Qty 
Council Monday afterno- 
on that the long-run quali- 
ty of life is bemg sacrific- 
ed for short-^nh gdils. 

Ms and diat at meet- 
uigs of the PUAnhtg Com- 
mission whicli he has 
attended, the Conunission 
"rubber stamped" every 
request. 

Hepler opposed the ap- 
plication submitted by 
R.G.Moore Building Cor- 
poration for changes of 
zoning on three tracts 
containing approximately 
77 acres in the Kempsville 
Borough. 

Coundl deferred action 
on the apphcation until 
Sept. 13 to change an 
agreement setting forth 
conditions of the rezon- 
ing. 

Hepler said that 40 
residents representing 
200 others who signed 
petitions in opposition we- 
re at the Cnnmission's 
recommended against ap- 
proval. 

He said the staff recom- 
mended against approval 
'because the rezoning is 
contrary to the comprehe- 
nsive plan. 

However, he said, "one. 
polished lawyer" represe- 
nted one man and thire 
wa» not one dissenting 
vote. 

He asked where was tbe 
compelling reason neces- 
sary to go aganst the 
comprehensive {dan. He 
said he did not know how 
the Hanning Gommiaslon 
could ignore the consWcr- 
A)le discussion that infec- 
ted 200 pe(9lie. 

He said thaft one »3inm- 
isskner sakl tlurt tlw Pla- 
nning Commission had to 
represent the entire dty. 
"What dUI the dtaem 
gain by letting one devel- 
oper make more moBey 
over the ^otesu d 200 
dtizens?" he uked. He 
said thM the PlaiuAig 
Comntttion was geved 
to help real estiM intere- 
su. 

Ihe Communtty Mtoc- 
iation, which supported a 
plan pttseflted bf the 
tppHc^ ^i M only 
be<»ise it «m sure tte 
reioBi^s moMW^t^ 
^dai^ mM^mi^met 
far input, te sakL 



Sciortino Favors Capital Punishment , «*^^ - f 

"I Would Have Thrown 




The Switch Myself! ' ' 



VIrglala Beach stadents and oflldals in Wa^hliicton, [1 to r] are: Jay I|eid, 
(^iW»ua» llMcaowi PMncesa Aim*; CangressinaB Bob^^iMt; .VcMbi-'CtMttl, 
^irst Oiionial; Joy liner, Bayside; Usa Taylor, KaOiun; Catftettte Anne Boyd; 
Venpsville; WOUam Tabb Pearson, C^en Ron; Barraco and Whitehnrst in the 
middle. ' 

Seven Beach Seniors Honored 



Seven Virginia Beach 
Ifigh Schod seniOTs rece- 
ntly received $50 U.S. 
Savings Bonds while visit- 
ing govenunent officials is 
Washingtcm, D.C. 

The students, represen- 
ting each of Virginia Bea- 
ch's high schods, were 
selected by their govern- 
ment teachers on the bas- 
is of leadership, courage, 
decisicn-making, pditical 
mott^^ticm, trust, initiat- 
ive, adaptability, and ser- 
vi<x to the community, 
according to the progr- 



am's founder Mrs. Mary 
S. Barraco. 

The program began in 
1972 "in order to get 
young people invdved in 
their government and to 
jH-omote the sense of patr- 
iotism, duty to country 
and leadership," Barraco 
said. 

UpcHi graduation, the 
students receive the 
"Out-standing Leadership 
Award," sp<m<x-ed by the 
Virginia Beach Republi- 
can Woman's Qub, Mrs. 
Bev Lassen, president. 



Lassen said funds far the 
student's trip to Washing- 
ton were generated thro- 
ugh an aimual fashicxi 
show. These funds also 
pay for the savings b(xids, 
which were recently pres- 
ented to the students by 
U.S. Senator John Warner 
and U.S. Qmgressman 
G. William Whitehurst. 

Virginia Senator A. Jos- 
eph Quiada, Jr., has been 
actively invdved with the 
student program and ac- 
companied the students to 
Washington. 



Fall Fashion Revue At The Cavalier 



A Fall Fashioi Revue is 
being held at the Beach 
Qub of the Cavalier Hotel 
on Thursday, August 26 at 
7:30 p.m. The fashicm 
show will be given by 
Alexander Beagle with 



music provided by Tommy 
Owaltney. The event is 
sponscx-ed by the Virginia 
Beach Democratic Wom- 
en's Qub. 

Tickets to the fashion 



shcwv are $14 per perscm 
and include two cocktails 
and heavy hors d'oeuvres. 
Tickets are available at 
Alexander Beegle's, 207 
Laskin Road, \^ginia Be- 
adi. 



Chamber Sponsored Brealtfast 

Beach Briefs On Water 



J. Burton Harriscn, 
chairman of the Virginia 
Be^h Chamber of Osm- 
merce's Water Study Task 
F<w<», Durwood S. Qu-I- 
ing, executive director of 
the Switheastem Public 
Service Authwity (SEP- 
S^ and Aubery V. Watts. 
Jr., director oi Public 
Utilities for the Qty (rf, 
Virgkiia Beach, will be the 
guest speakers on "Wat- 
er," the tc^ic for the 
Friday, August ^ Beach 
Brief, spoittored by tte 
Vkgiiua Beach Chamber 
ofCommer^. 

CXscussltm is expected 
U) ODver: the current 
water supply ofHicms open 
to Virginia BcKh, the 
fyummk cosu (tf ttese 
aidau, tlw {Kxsibilities 
regard!^ a regknal wat- 



er supply, and the long- 
range effects d Wrginia 
Beach's water supirfy pro- 
blems. Tune will be 
available f(x questions 
and answers. 

Harrison, President d 
the Bank of Vli^inia Be- 
ach, has been chairman 
of the Water Study Task 
F«xe since it was esta- 
blislMd two years ago. 
The Task For« has repea- 
tedly urged action to sec- 
ure an adequate long- 
range water supply for the 
dty. 

Curting, as du-edor d 
SEPSA has advocated a 
regional approach to ti« 
water supply prdjlem. 
AmcMg the poiittiUhws 
studied by SEPSA taive 
been Sumerton Oeek, 
Assamoosick Swdnp and 



Lake Gastcm, all to the 
west of the Tidewater 
metro region. 

Watts, who is responsi- 
ble far the Qty's wtter 
system, bas been invdved 
in the various water stud- 
ies in recent years, includ- 
ing the negotiations rega- 
rding possible Virginia 
^ach participatiai in the 
AppomiUtoK River Water 
Authority. 

The Brief w open to the 
public, aiMl the cast is $6 
per person. Starting time 
h 7:45 a.m. at Tandom's 
Vim Tree ton, 2932 Virgi- 
nia Beach Boulevard, and 
a AiU breakfast will be 
served. Reservations are 
AMEssary, and may be 
mule by calling the Qm- 
m^Tc^x at 490-1221. 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

Wheri the Commonwealth of Mrginia threw the 
switch last week, electrocuting convicted murderer 
Frank Coppda, death penalty foes around the state 
ccxnplained bitterly that capital punishment is inhum- 
ane and possibly unconstitutional. 

In Virginia Beach, the man responsible for prosecut- 
k me criMnals and, when necessary, seeking the death 
^^j|ilQr for ci^victions, says capital punishment is a 
/Mcessary evil d' modem sodety. 

"I dai't like it," said Commonwealth's Attwney 
Paul A. Sdortipo. "I feh very badly about Coppda, but 
I felt strcmg enough abcKit the need fOT the death 
penalty that I would have gone up and thrown the 
switch myself." 

Although he finds the death penalty repulsive, 
Sciortino explained that the statute serves as a 
deterrent to would-be perpetrata-s of vident crimes. 
"Without it, we'd be giving free license to anyone to go 
out and cOTimit murder," he said. "It is hard to gauge 
the effectiveness of the death penalty as a deterrent. 
How do we know how many pec^le out there have 
thought about murdering somecme, but then they 
th(xight they themselves w(xild be executed? 

"One thing I do know is this," Sciortino ccmtinued. 
"The aie guy who is deterred by the death penalty is 
the COTivict. After the penalty is exacted on him, we 
know he won't commit any more murders." 

Sciortino says he has never sent a criminal to death 
row because he has "never encountered a case which 
warranted it." One case currently pending for which 
he would like to seek the death penalty is that of Paul 
Garnett. The 18 year-dd Vkginia Beach resident is 
charged with the April 24th murder of his Green Run 
High Schod todustrial Arts teacher, Cynthia Henley, 
who was stabbed 36 times while in bed at her hcxne on 
Ships Chandlers Warf. "If ever a person deserved the 
death penalty, this could be it," Sdortino said. 

However, Garnett is only charged with one count 
each of murder and breaking and entering with intent 
to commit a felony. Neither charge is a capital offense, 
Sciwtino said, indicating he would pursue the maxium 
five years to life sentences for each. "I do not intend to 
plea bargain in this oie even though he is so young," 
the prosecutor said, "Ihis was such a vident act and I 
never, ever agree to probation with vident crimes." 

Before prosecuting such a case, Sciortino says he 
ascertains if the vidations in question could be 
classified as class <me felaues o. capital tenses. 
There are seven classifications of murder which fall 
under the class one definition. Murder comiucted 
during abducUon with intent to gain money, murder for 
hire, muKler by an mmate, murder during the 
canmission of a robbery, murder during a rape, 
murder of a pdice ofScer, and multiple murder all fit 
the bill, wxording to Sdortino. 

"Fu-st lire try the case on the basis <rf iimocence or 
guilt," Sdortino said. "If we get a conviction, then it is 
up to the defense to prove that the death penalty is 
unneoxsary. The questiai the jiu^a^ face is this: Has 
thejlefendant demonstrated he k so dangeroia to the 
comnunity that he no longer deserves to be a i»rt of it? 

"But, with a 20 year old kid. 1 just don't tWnk a jury 
would kiU him," Sciortino said. The axtoemy said 
mtvder trials we "always very emotional for everyone 
in^^ed," and that he understaiKis a jury's reluctance 
to comlemn a man to <teath. It is difficult, Sdortino 
said, to ask for the death penalty. * 'But. I realize that a 
lot ^ these peo|^ are lite mad dogs who must be put to 
death. We just can't have them running loose." 

Mscussing tlK current public outcry, Sdwtino 
Utened the death penalty to idxirtiion. "People feel 
very strongly about it, and there is no nu<klle grouiKi." 
he said. "They're either for it or they are against it." 

One (tebate in whteh CTitics et^age regartb the many 
varfcd methods of carrying out (»|Mtal punishment. 
WWte Virginia favors electrocution, Texas prefers 



injection of lethal drugs, while Utah uses a nring squad. 
Death penalty foes differ on which method is the most 
humane. "1 don't think yai'll ever find a nice way of 
killing saneone," Sciortino said. "WcHild you prefer 
using the gallows and noose and cracking their necks? 
How about if we went back to the guillotine and have 
their heads chopped off?" 

What is needed. Sdortino said, is a streamlining (A 
the judicial process. "Justice delayed is justice 
denied," he said. "Ihere are far too many 
continujQices and appf^ injU)f courts. _J^ allowing 



•". 


1 ^jB^K^^^^^ 


". . .A lot of these 
people are like mad 
dogs who must be put 
to death. We just 
can't have them run- 
ning loose" - Scior- 
tino 




Sdortino 



these delays and other shenanigans we are making a 
mockery of justice. 

"I think if a person is sentenced to death, he snouid 
be killed cm the appdnted date and time," he said. 

SciOTtino blamed intervention from higher courts for 
the backlogs. "The federal appelate courts are trying 
to run the state court systems." he said. "The burden 
is now on the the U.S. Supreme Court to get the federal 
courts out of the lower courts." 

Despite the predictions of civil libertarians, the 
QVpda case wiU not be the catalyst for a return to 
routine executions in Virginia, Sciortino said. "1 don't 
think the state or the govemcM- is that bloodthirsty to 
engage in mass murder. Every executko fran now on 
is gdng to be a bitter fight gdng right down to the wure. 

"Maybe it is good, maybe not," Scicfftino added. "I 
just wish we'd make a dedsion mi capital punishment 
one way or another. If the Supreme Court wMits to do 
away with it, fine. 1 just wish they'd go ahead and 
make a decision." 



Arts Fest Features 
Oceanside Bazzar 



This year, an Oceansioe 
Bazaar will be featured at 
the Neptune Festival. 
Sponscved by the Virginia 
Beach Arts CentCT. The 
Baauu is slated to run 
Oct. 1, 2, ami 3, along the 
Boaitiwalk starting at 20th 
Street. 

A spdoesman for the 
Arts Center, sakl recent- 
ly, "We're toddi^ for 
pede who wish to exhibit 
and sell high-qualhy, 
haiKtmi^ itenu such as* 
ceramics, quilts and imU- 



cm^s, macrame, woodwo- 
rk, tde painting, bastet- 
ry, and embrddery." 

Spaces for the Ocean- 
side Bazaar will be filled 
on a first-come, first-serv- 
ed basis. The cteMUine for 
submitting applications m 
September W, 1^2. Ad- 
ditional infonmtion n^r 
bedMaiaedtttte Vu^ii- 
ia BcmA Artt Center m. 
1711 Arctic Aveniw, Ywg- 
inia Beach. Virginia, 
23431. Telephone (MM) 
42S-0000. 



•^^mmm^m^m 



Wi 



2 Virginia Be»± Sun. Mgust 18, 1982 



Slin Commentary 



Editorials 

r 



Fire The Vets? 



Why impose term limitations on school 
"board members? It is unnecessary and 
has only served to muddy the issue of 
achieving academic excellence. 

Virginia Beach school board members 
are appointed, when necessary, by City 
Council. Until 1981, the appointees were 
free to serve as long as they could, 
provided they were reappointed. But in 
1981 Council decided that the continued 
existance of some members on the board 
is not conducive to the perpetuation of 
higher educational standiu^ds in the city. 
In the crossfire, three veteran school 
board members will likely step down from 
their non-paying posts next year. Under 
present Council policy board members 
may not serve more than three con- 
secutive three yev terms. Consequently, 
board chairman Roy A. Woods, Reva 
Kelberg, both members since 1966, and 
Leland Hood, a member since 1970,^ 
must, whether they like it or not, allow 
their positions to be filled from proposed 
names kept in a city sanctioned talent 
bank. 

For some reason, however, there seems 
to be a question mark beside Woods*' 
name, i^though he is scheduled to 
descend from the board, there is suppq|^ 
for him should he attempt to stay on. 

Why is there more attention focused 
now on Woods than on Kelberg or Hood? 

First off. Woods is the city's first black 
school board member. In a city that 
almost 90Vo white, that's a plus for the 
city's equality image. A black has never 
served on City Council, and Woods 
argues that there are far too few blacks in 
any of the city's administrative offices. 
SecondJy, Woods, who, it has been said, ' 
has performed very well in his capacity as 
chairman, will have served as chairman 
for the shortest duration in the city's 
history. But, if reason is to prevail. 
Woods has served the board in spite of 
these two aforementioned distinctions. 
He has served because he is well educated, 
thoughtful, dedicated and competent. 



Similar remarks may also be made about 
Kelberg and Hood. But Woods is the 
chairman, the pilot of the ship, and will 
be until next July when the new school 
board members are sworn in. 

City Council has shackled itself by im- 
posing term limitations. ' Since school 
board members serve at Council's 
pleasure, why not just let them do just 
that. That way, if a person is good th^ 
will endure. If not, that is all. But in- 
stead, by imposing the limitations, Coun- 
cil has wrapped itself in a constraining 
blanket which could preclude it from 
retaining competent board members. 

True, things, including school systems, 
need to change to progress. But the 
change must be orchestrated by those who 
are most familiar with the system, the 
board and its history. New board mem- 
bers may add new life and blood to the 
L existing board, but youth cannot alwaj^ 
replace age, experience, and maturity. 
Because Council decides that it would be 
beneHcial to allow new faces on the 
board, does it necessarily follow that the 
previotis administrators had done an 
inadequate job? Of course not. 

Under the present situation, Woods is 
uncertain of his future. He says hes con- 
tent on stepping down, thus allowing him- 
self more time to serve other groups and 
organizations, such as Bayside Hospital, 
to which he has just been named as a 
director. 

Even though it appears Woods would 
be a valuable asset to any organization he 
serves, his importance to the Virginia 
Beach School Board is questioned. Th«'e 
are plenty of qualified appUcants for t^e 
openings in the talent bank, some sayt-'' 
The question is, whether or not the 
educational system will be best served by 
throwing off the veterans in favor of new 
people, or, are the veterans being 
dismissed to give others a chance to serve 
in a quality school system which grew un- 
der the guidance of such people as 
Woods, Kelberg and Hood? - G.D.G. 



An Eye For An Eye? 



Suffolk Delegate J. Samuel Glasscock 
called the sight of smoke rising from the 
Ufeless skull ••grisly." Outside the 
prison's confines, civil libertarians 
around the state sulked, as then: last- 
minute efforts to save the condemned 
murderer from his date with the electric 
chair had failed. At 11:27 p.m. last 
Tuesday night, the Commonwealth of 
Virginia murdered Frank Coppola. 

"Barbaric" and "animalistic" are two 
adjectives commonly used by capital 
punishment opponents to describe this 
country's method of achieving justice for 
violent, criminal zcXs. They point to the 
Bible, proclaiming, "Thou Sialt Not 
Kill." Somehow, though, they must have 
missed the line about ''An Eye For An 
Eye..." 



The rationale behind capital punish- 
ment is twofokl: to insure that justiM is 
carried out, and to deter would-be 
criminals. In b<^ cases, however, the 
American criminal jus^:e syston has 
failed miserable. 

Justify, as we know it, u suppc^ed to 
iimire that Mntoicing is avried out swif- 
tly. Y^.beoMie of the (^ek and balance 
sysUan we have which alloum tm appeals 
to go on iwteflnitely, many ytm% can pass 
htt&se a ovninti h^m s^vioi a priscm 
tmm. CoDves^, an uiMK^nt ^aa. 



\ 



which Coppola claimed he was, can 
become so frustrated with the system that 
he merely gives up and requests to be 
executed. Is this justice? 

As far as deterring crime, it is 
questionable if capital punishment is suc- 
cessful. Just six men have beoi put to 
death in American prisons since tte 
Supreme Court ruled on its con- 
stitutionality in 1977. More than a dozoi 
men in Virginia and over 200 across the 
country are on death row now and have 
b^n for a long time. Most, however wfll 
not meet with the same demise as Cop- 
pola. Why? Becai»e of appeals. 



"My opinion is that if somebody is sen- 
tenc«i to die, th«i he should be killed cu 
the appointed date and time," says 
Virginia Beach Commonw«Uth's Att(^* 
i»y, Paul Sciortino. The prosecutor sa^ 
that by doing away with the seemingly 
ui^nding appeals pro<^s, justi(x wouU 
be served and an ef f^^ive ^terrent wouM 
be m place. 

While any comni^ionate, rationi^ 
honnn being would have to qu^tion tte 
necessity of oyrital inmishm^^, om luis 
to admit that Sd<Htiito'$ r^iurks ma|e 
s^ise. D^th peiMlty sunxvto^ awl op- 
po^ts alike must zsffst with him that v^ 
evaluation of tl^ sf^Mm is in (viter. - 
M.M>G* 



Letters To The Editor 



Well Documented Newspaper 



Editor: 

I wish to thank the Editor and staff of the Virginia 
Beach Sun for providing the people of >^ginia with an 
outstuiding, well documented newspaper. 

I ateo wish to conunent and congratutete the staff on 
the recent publteation of the Special Edition, which I 



found to be iilipressive, infOTmative and interesting. 
Keep up the good work. 

Mary S. Barraco 
Virginia Bead) 



The Cavalier Series 



Editor: 

I really enjo^d reading the first part of your series 
on the Cavalier Hotel. When I fint thought of moving 
to this area in the 19S0's, I was a guest at the dd hotel 
for a week and fell in love with it. The friendly family 
atmosphere I encountered there convinced me that 
Virginia Beach was where I wanted to call "home." 



Your article reminded me of those days with its 
insightful analysis and flowhig imagery. I look forward 
greatly to the remaining segments. 

Mrs. Bruno Schwartz 
^giniaBeadi 



liotel Controversy 



Editor: 

Judging from transpirings in recent weeks, it seems 
as though the city has an axe to grind with a few select 
businessmen. Why is it that the Ivanhoe Hotel is being 
singled out for zoning violations, when there are so 
many other establishments along the boardwalk which 
also are vidating the law? And, why was Ocean 



Eddie's forced to reduce its noise level when so many 

other clubs io town jday that awful rock and roll even 

louder? 

Why don't our city frohers get off their duCb and 

worry about something important lite traffic problems, 

flooded outroads, and (7ime? „^ ^ , 

Edna Thomapple 

' \^inia Beach 



Keep The Rape Out 



Editor: 

Like everyone, I find rape to be a vile, disgusting act. 
However, I do not see the need for supposed "frunily" 
publications like The \%ginia Beach Sun to print stories 
about it. I don't want my kids having to read about 
perverts who nm around ri4)uig women. If I wanted 
that, I would buy Playboy, Rolling Stone, or some other 



sinful purveyor of smut and bring it into my home for 
ihy chUdren. 
I think you ought to dean up your act. 

Amdd Cunningham 
, \lrginia Beach 






£? 



USPS-MO-140; Published Wednesdays, 
13S RoscmoBt Road, Virginia Beach, Va.. 23352 
PhW 004)486-3430 '^^^^-'- 

S ? "'I " 

HanesBycriy GregGoMfarb 

Publisher EiUtor 



WItUn Tidewater Area 

One Year ••9.00 

Two Years •*12.00 



All Other Areas 

One Year -'ILOO 

Two Years - t^jf^ 



Second Oaas Portage Is Paid at Lynnhaven Nation 
In VhflBia Beach, Virginia 



r! 



l;etters Welcome 

The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and 
encourages letters to tlu editor. They 
should be typed, double sfmced and in- 
clude the writers name, address and 
phone number. Mail letters to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, VA, 23452. 



Write Your Lawmakers 



At the state levd, Virginia Beach is represented 
by four Senators and four Ddegates. When the 
General Assembly is in session, address memb^s 
at: 

General Assembly Building 

910 Capital Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23219 

State Senate: 

Districts, 6, 7: 

Peter K.Babalas(D) 

210 Atlantic National Bank Building 

413 Salm P«il'« Boulevard 

Norfolk, Vir^nia 23510 

Ph(me:(8O4)62^3100 

EvdynM. Haley (D) 

153S Versilles Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 23S09 

Phone:(804)627-1546 

Stanley C. Walker (D) 

P.O. Box 12885 

Norfolk. Virginia 23502 

Phone: (804) 853-9280 



IXstrict8: 



A. oMph Canada, Jr. (R) 

508 S.Krdneck Road 

Viighilaliiiarh, Virginia 23454 

none: (804) 422-8833 



District 14: 



WllUamT.Pwker(D) 

524 Cedar Road 

Ch»^>eake. Virpnia 23320 

Phone: (804)547-1600 



>of] 

IMrkt38: 

Willlaa R. 0u«er) O'Men (R) 

ty T iiHn ITnid 

Vh^rtaHfartt, \^^ya 23451 

Ptow: 004) 4^-6021 

Mflvin ^fB ce ^) 
13«l«riteftoad,^5 
Yk^aMtmAt \^^te ^51 
(804)^8-109 



Gkan B. M(danan (D) 

425 S.Witchdttck Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Phone:(804)497-9451 

Owen B. Pickett (D) 

P.O. Box 2127 

Vu-ginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

Phone: (804) 340^11 

J.W.(BiUy)0'Brira(D) 

3300 O janSh<M« Avenue 

Virgir'^Beadi. Virginia 23451 

Phone:(804)481-5964 



At the fedend levd, Virginia Bcaech is reprewn- 
ted by two SraiUors and two Omgressmm: 

U.S. Senate: 

The Honorable lolm W. Warner (R) 

Ro<»n 6^9 Dirksen Riilding 

WaiUi«tOB, D.C. 20510 

Phone: (202) ££44023 

The Honorable Htfry F. Byrd (I) 

417 RnsseD Office Building 

Washfaigton. D.C. 2^10 

Fboi»:{2fay2M-4BS4 

U.S. Hoiiw of RepveaMtathres: 

Second Coi««^mal District 

Hie Honorable G. Wffiiua Whitehiuvt (R) 

2427 Raybum HoiMe Of ^e WOi^t 

Wi^dngtOB. D.C. 20311 

HKHie: (202)225-4213 

Also: PaaluoktOmt^^tOl 

Virgimatoudi,Viiiinia 23462 
Ph(we: (804) ^0-2393 

Fmirth Co««re^onal IM^ 

The Kmo^ ^tat W. Di^d. Jr. (R) 

£»#lMtam ttowtlMte Bitffttig 

WMhl^toii.D.C. ^15 

phMerOO^^-OW 

PMsnMWth, Vi^tm Wm 
Acne: ^)^ 441-6797 



Virginia Beach Sun. August 18. 1982 3 



City Cpuncll 



Salem Woods Says Stop 



Continued From Page 1 

He asked CoiuK^ not to 

have the sign «^ch re- 

(#uls. "Virginia Beach, 

iMost Crowded Reswt 

aty." 

Moore had uked rezcn- 
ing from R-S Resictential 
Distrkt to R-8 Residential 
District on two parcels 
totalling 42.637 acres and 
from R-S Residential Dist- 
rict to R-6 Residential 
gj District on a 34.4 acre 
•^.parcel on the south and 
west of Williamantic 
Drive. 
ii Grover Wright,attomey 
,;. for Moore, said that the 
tract bemg developed by 
Moore totals 157.3 acres 
which will be deveh^^d 
into single-family residen- 
ces subject to restrictions. 
He said the net increase 
in density for the entire 
tract is 30 units for a total 
of 499 units and a density 
of 3. 2 units. IbeCJompre- 



hcnsive Plan calls fior 
three units per acre. 

Restrictioas agreed to 
by the dvic league call fior 
single-family detached 
homes for saks, a nuni- 
mum lot frontage of 4S 
feet, excavation of a dra- 
hiage canal with the sictes 
Kjdaced with top soU, a 
50-car paved parking lot, 
a pod and club house 
which are to be completed 
by May 30. 1983 and other 
pvk sites. 

Qty Attorney Dale Bim- 
son said that some of the 
restrictions in the agree- 
ment would more approp- 
riately be addressed dur- 
ing the site planning rev- 
iew process. Changes will 
be made accordingly and 
presented to Council on 
Sept. 13. 

Carol Young, a resident 
of Salem Woods and a 
realtor, said that she thou- 
ght the Moore project 



would help the commun- 
ity. 

Paul Redgate, oS Salem 
Woods, said that the dty 
should closely monitor the 
growth in that area of the 
city. 

Dwight P. Jones, of the 
Salem Road Community 
League, said that Moore, 
when one of the parcels 
was rezoned previously to 
R-6 (not registered yet on 
the city maps) said that he 
would never build on the 
property m<ve imits than 
R-6aUowed. He said that 
he could not de>«lop the 
property as R-6 becaiise 
the road dedication will 
take too much of the land 
as it will take his, Jones' 
farm. He said he was 
opposed. 

Wright said it would be 
a qu^ty protject. well 
planned. He said he ws 
glad that the biggest pro- 
blem the city had ws how 



1 



•« 




STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

bcinkof XJigioKi becicK 



CoDsoUdated Report of CondltloB of Bank of Virginia Beach of Virginia 
Beach, Vir^nm and Foreign and Domestic Subsidiaries, at the close of 
business June 30, 1982 ,, a state banking institution organized and operating 
under the banking laws of tiiis State and a member of tiie Federal Reserve 
System. Published in accordance witii a call made by the Stote Banking 
Authorities and by the ^deral Reserve Bank of this District. 

CoMoUdatcd Baprnt of Condition of Bank of Virginia Bea:ch at close of 
business on June 30, 1982 . 



to control orderly growth. 
"Thrt's the kind of probl- 
em you should have." he 
said. Quoting a former 
coundlman, he said, "Ev- 
erybody who moves into 
the city wants to be the 
last person here." 

Councilwoman Meyera 
Obemdrof asked why clu- 
stered housing wasn't co- 
nsidered instead of rezon- 
ing. 

Wright said that R. G. 
Moore is the /xpert or 
building. "He's the only 
one who doesn't know a 
recession is on. ^paren- 
tly the public isn't buying 
(cluster housing)." 

OberndcM-f was concer- 
ned that a precedent was 
being set. 

Wright said that other 
developers seeking rezon- 
ing would have to be 
subject to the same condi- 
tions. 



News? 
Call The 

Sun 
486-3430 



Assets 



Dollar Amount in Thousands 



1 . Cash and due frmn depository institutions 

2. U. S. Treasury securities 

3. Obligations of othor U. S. Oovemment agencies and corporations 

4. ObhlitfdhS of Statesahd poKtied nrtidivisions in tlie United States 
S.AU other securities 

6. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell 

7. a. Loans. Total (oiduding unearned income) 33949 

b. Less: >Ulowance for posnble loan losses 4t3 

c. Loans, Net . 

8. Lease financing receivables 

9. Bank pronises, furniture ami fixtum. and other assets representing 
bank pronises. 

10. Real esute owned otha than bank premises 

11. All other assets 

12. TOTAL ASSETS 

LiftbiUties 

13. D«naiul deposits of individuds, partnenhips, and corporations 

14. Time and saving dqjoriU of individuals, partnerships, 
and corporations. 

1 5 . Deposits of United States Govemmoit 

16. Deposits of States and poUtical subdivisions in the United SUtes 

17. AU other deposits 

18. Certified and offices' eheclts 

19. Total Deposits ^_ 

a. To^ demand deposits 22 

b. Total tioM and savings dq>osiu 277W 

20. Fedoal funds purdiased and securities s<rid unda agreements 
torQiurchase *^ 

21 . Int^-est-bearing demand aotM (note Iwlances) issued to the U.S. 
Treaniry and otiwr UaUtttks for borrowed money 

22. Mortgi^tnd^tcdnessamiUability few capitaliKd leases 

23.AUothCTliabiUtici / 

24. TOTAL LIABILm^ (excluding subordinated notes and debentures) 

23. Subordinated notes and deboitures 

Equity Capital 

26. Preferred kock a. No. shares outstanding • (ParVahie) 

27. Common ^dc a. No. shares authorized^ l,iM,M0 ' 

b.No.dnresoutstandfaig 334,ai3 (Par Value) 

28. Surplus 

29. Undividwl profits and rewrve for contingendes 
anl (Mto* oq^ resent 

30. TOTAL KJUmr CAPITAL 

31 . TOTAL LIABItrnES AND EQUITY CAPITAL 

MenKNWida 

1 . Amounts CMtstan<Ung as of rq>ort date: 
. a. Standby 1^^ of erott. total 

b. Time t^tificates of deposit In d«u»ninations of $100,000 or m^e 

c. Otim tone (^Mdts fas ainovats of $100,000 os mc»e 

X. Aventfi for 30 caieadar days (or cale^ar numth) ending with report date: 
a. Totid d^<^ts 




Jennings Resigns From Commission 



The Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Com- 
mission last week accepted the resignation of for- 
mer member Jack Jennings, a City Councihnan 
who feared he may have been Involved In a con- 
flict of hiterest. Debating the matter above are, 
from left, Capt. Bucky Moore, Richard Branlch, 
Milton Woodhousc, Donald Lee, George 
Schachle, Al Wilder, and BUI Masterson. 



The 28-membcr commission, chaired by 
Richard Webbon and directed by department head 
Harold Whltchiint, addressed a number of topics 
at Ito bi-monthly aesdon, Indudlng the upcomlns 
"Shakespeare By The Sea Festival," to be held 
August 27 through September 5 at the PavlUon. 
For Information about this or any other city 
recreation activity, caU 467-4884. 




Center President 



J<An B. Mair has been 
named vice president of 
Cdumbus Center, a busi- 
ness community being 
developed in the Pembr- 
oke area by Eigcn Proper- 
ties. 

^ Mfur haji been seniOT 
manager in tliV PSeal'K'fr' 
ate Investment Depart- 
ment of CcHinecticut Gen- 
eral Life Insurance Co., 
Hartford. Cain. 

He will be responsible 
for the overaU manage- 
ment of the Cdumbus 
Center development, in- 



cluding building manage- 
ment and leasing. 

Mair, his wife and his 
two children reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

The First & Merchants 
Financial Center, the of- 
fice tower now under con- 
"sffudfoni'ls'the f!«t baff- 
ding in the Columbus 
Center canplex. Colum- 
bus Center will eventually 
consist of several high- 
rises, including shopping, 
office, hotels and residen- 
tial facilities as, well as a 
landscaped park. 



1300 

550 
Noae 

3<7 

None 



NOM 

1670 
list 

1153 

4521 

44469 



470 

2661 

Noae 

37119 



I. J. mutm Harriioa. Jr.. Pr«sidatt of die above-named bank do berdiy 
declare that ^ R^ort <rf ConMioa ^i^KttiV tiie siq»per^ idiednlts) has 
been preiwed in (x^ormuxx with the instructkms issued 1^ the BMrd of 
Ofwemors of the Federal Reserve ^ttem and » mie to the best of my 

knowle<^ ttd bdi^. 

J. ^vton Harrto<m. Jr.. Prmdoit 

We. tiM Hader:^Md dirw^n. mm tte comtexmrn of tte Report of Cmi- 
dition 0a^iAw the n«pai^ lehcdite) Md deelne that it has been 
examinad Iv «• tad CO tke b«t of ourkaovHodfe nd better has boea prepared 
In cMfernuet vM tfw kittwstiOM toned by tke Board <rf Qovenss of the 

Frferal Utters ft^rtamwd to true and eocrert. _ 

TteanaCI^M 
W. R. KAwOT. Jr. 



Fifst Savings and Loan 

Association 

of Suffolk 

is Dedicated to Being 

Good Local 

"Citizens" 

We're Now Part of 
Citizens Savir^gs & Loan 

We're one of the largest and strongest federally-chartered 

savings and loan associations in Virginia. Citizens' assets 

now total nearly $340,000,000. At July 31, its net worth was 

three times the required minimum. With offices m Suffolk, Franklin, 

Virginia Beach and P^tsmouth, plus 1 offices in the Richmond 

area and one in Faffmville, we're dedicated to providing a full 

range of "hometown " savings and investment services. 

f<^ Smart Money Managers 



Brickell with Summit 



Virginia Beach resident 
Sean Brickell has joined 
The Summit Grcxip, a 
local advertising, marke- 
ting, and public relations 
firm. The announcement 
was made today by Harry 
Padgett, president. 



Brickell, who was with 
Arthur Pdizos Associates, 
was appointed Public Rel- 
aticMis Director. 

The Summit Group has 
offices in the 101 Building 
in downtown Norfolk. 



Lowery Engaged 



Mr. and Mrs. Jack He- 
yer of Chesapeake have 
announced the engage- 
ment of their daughter 
Linda Heyer Lowery of 
Virginia Beach to Stephen 
Alan Bowden of Chesa- 
peake. 

Bowden is the son of 



C3iesapeake residents Mr. 
and Mrs. George W. Bow- 
den. 

Bowden and Heyer both . 
attending Indian River 
High Schod. The wed- 
ding will take place cm 
Saturday, Sept. 18. 



^ 



Citi2eiis 

SWfNOSGIiOAN 

Su«ofc, 1 1 7 Mafket Street, 5^-2323 

Frw**^510 ^^o^th tJtim Street. 5^-21 63 

\flrgwM B«^ 5284 PrwMenc^ Road, 495-0932 

ft^lsiTKHrth, "^er Mall, \*;tory Bwlevard. 488-4541 




/ 



FAIRFIELD OPTICAL CENTER 

5216 FAIRFIELD SHOPPING CENnM 
495-1974 




^^^^ 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, August 18, 1982 



Beach Entertainment 



Balladeer 
Croons At 
Hilltop 

Ton Farley, an institu- 
tion in Virginia Beach 
nightclubs, both thr(High 
his associaticm with the 
HerndcHi Edwards Band 
and as a solo act, recently 
made an in-store appear- 
ance at the Music Den at 
Hilltop West Shopping 
Center off Laskin Road. 

Farley, a regular at the 
Jewish Mother on Pacific 
Avenue, also appears thr- 
oughout the year at vari- 
ous pubs throughout Yug- 
inia Beach and the Tide- 
water vicinity. The acous- 
tic guitar player and sing- 
er was prcMnoting his new 
solo album, "Songsmy- 
i th," and he played tunes 
' by other artists such as 
Loggins and Messina, as 
' well. 

The event was ''a big 
success," said Bc^bi Mik- 
kelsen, manager of the 
Music Den and a member 
of the board of directo-s 
for the Hilltop Square 
Merchants Association. 
"The purpose fw Tom's 
appearance was to allow 
Music Den to participate 
in the sidewalk sale that 
was going on at thes help- 
ing center last week. The 
free performance was our 
way of contributing . * * 

Mikkelsen added the 
mini-concert was a means 
for promcMing the store's 
new concept of sales, 
"We are a complete fami- 
ly entertainment center," 
she said, pointing out that 
the store offers a ccxnplete 
line of video merchandise 
in addition to records, 
tapes, and Whisper Coo- 
certs tickets. 

Farley will be returning 
for another appearance in 
the fall, Mickelsen said, 
as will a number of other 
artists. 





LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY 
WITH RAY BROWN 
ON THE PIANO 



COCKTAILS 
DiiuMT Served 'til 2.-00 a-m. 



You're Goi^ To Love Our 
2" THICK 

NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 



tlO^s 



mora than 
Mforttitlw 
20 min. trip to Portsmoiuthl 

301© HIGH ST..PORTSMOUTH 

397-8196 

PIMM call for diractions. 
^Opsar 8 ».Bi.-2 a.aL ( d o«ad Moadaya) 



. Tiy «M A yaaV apnMt 



LIVE MAINE LOIKTER 

IH lb. Lobatar itullatf wMi 
our Jmaho Crab Meat 

HM $1^95 

ONLY ±»% 

Yowl rtcaiMMBd it to Mw MmM 




SoDgsmyth Tom Farley makes an liir<tora appearance at The Music Den. 



( Tou deserve a fine meal expertly 

served in the relaxed atmosphere of Old Virginia. 

Thats |ust what you get at the Aberdeen Barns. 



•PRIME BEEF 
•SEAFOOD 
•COCKTAILS 
•FINE WINES 
•BANQUET FACILITIES 



OPEN 

EVENINGS 4-12 
SUNDAYS 12-10 

5805 Northhampton Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

464-1580 

rN OUR COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
William Burnell 

Major Credit Cards Accepted 




ABiSBBBN 
BABNS. J 



Whisper Concerts Schedule Announced 



Whisper Concerts, Inc. 
of Virginia Beach has 
announced the fdlowing 
concerts for the Tidewater 
area: 

Coming to Virginia Bea- 
ch will be the Motels, 
August 29 at the IX»ne. 
Also coming to the beach 
will be David Jc^ansen 
Sept. 7 at Rogues. 

Other acts coming to 
the area include: 38 Spec- 
ial, August 27 at Scope; 



REG Speedwagcm, Sept. 2 
at Hamptcm Cdiseum; the 
Charlie Daniels Band, 
Sept. 5 at Sccqje; Fleet- 
wood Mac, Sept. 10 at 
Scope; and the Go-Go's, 
Sept. 14 at Scc^e. 

Tickets for all shows are 
available at Mother's Re- 
COTds and Tapes, Barr's 
Pharmacy at 17th and 
Atlantic Avenue, Birdland 
RecOTds, Naval Opera- 



ticMis Base Special Servi- 
ces, and Tracks Records 
and Tapes. Further infor- 



mati(m can be obtained by 
callmg Whisper at 428- 
4451. 



*********************i^********* 




IH 
THl 

This on* won V be taken inside 
because if you can V do it in the woods, 
where can you do it? 



Registration is Set 
For ODU-Beach Ballet 



The ODU/Va. Beach 
Ballet will hcdd registra- 
tion for its Fall semester 
of classes on August 27 
and 30, frcrni 10 a.m. to 
noon and frc»n 3 to 7 p.m. 
both days. 

Registration will take 
place at bc^h studios: 
ODU Campus, Health and 
niysical Education Build- 
ing roc»n 217 and Hilltop 
studio, 620 Village Drive, 
Virginia Beach. The 16 
week semester begins 



August 30 and ends Dec- 
ember 17. 

Classes offered include 
classical ballet, character 
dance, modern jazz, musi- 
cal ccnnedy dance forms 
and, offered fcr the first 
time at the Hilltcq) studio 
only, slimnastics with 
dance. Classes for ages 
six and up. Special class- 
es for adults. 

Fa€ mOTe information 
on classes and schedules, 
call 440-4486. 




Slaves 

fARK 

SU RRY, VA. '*y 

GREGG 

ALLMAN 

BAND 



DANCE EVERY NIGHT AT 

Fantastic ^^ 




IfENWICK'S 



Live Band 

MONDAY & TUESDAY 



• SATURDAY, 

: AUGUST . 
: 2 pa 'HI WMiIrt 



Huur. on 
rdOi 



TKKtTS 






WWW Or. (Kwl, %mi 



•°I i"'" C«'' I-934^)©67.BAG PRODUCTIONS 



♦ » ♦ * ♦ 



Dance To Your Favorite D.J. 

Wednesday thru Sunday 



Si 



miitld 



OPEN FOR m SUMMER 

SAILBOAR0 

Sales, Icnou, rentals 

$7 lessoB, $7 rental with Uils ad 

J0 





2 for 1 

Lunch or Dinner 

Buy one at regular price, 

receive second of equal 

value or less FREE! 

jwraKGOCMXWLYWraCOOTOWTMIUSiFr.lS.lWaj 



Salad 990 
Bar 

CHOOSE FROM 
30 ITEMS! 

Lunch Only 



I 
I 

plus tax I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



cwris GO(H> (»«.¥ mm cwnMN tbm; sBpr 



. IS. 1M3. 



SiJ 



OPEN 
Moo.Sun from 11 a.m.-l a.m. 

FaSat frtrni 9 a.m.-2 a.m. 



Car, 



ering 



WATI^KB 

JULY SNOW au SALE 

TENNtt EQUm^NT SALE 

CAUL NOWl 

499-1080 

m^ f-1/4:J0-6 SAT. 12-5 Pm 



FANTASTIC FENWICKS 

4621 Witchduck Rd. 

Va. Beach 

490-0581 




Community News 



Virginia Beach Sun, August 18, 1^2 S 



Game May Become New Va, Beach School Craze 



In an age when battery 
opo-ated. hand-held (»)m- 
puter calculators and 
video display terminals! 
have taken risidence in 
classrooms right alongside 
chalkboards and 
sliderules, officials in 
Virginiii Beach may have 
stumbled upon a ratto* 
novel approach to the 
teaming process. It a 



called "fun." 

Starting in the fiUl. 
several elementary schoo- 
ls within the system will 
begin experimentaticn wi- 
th a game called "Q-a»," 
which tests the partkipa- 
nts' pr(^ciency in m^- 
ematical skills and compu- 
tations. 

According to Frank J. 
Wool, supervisor fac ele- 




ON THE A 
AND IN THE 



WITH DANNY McCL AIN 



1. Survivor Eye Of The Tiger 

2. Fleetwood Mac Hold Me' 

3. Crosby. Stills And Nash Wasted On The Way 

4. Chicago Hard To Say I'm Sorry 

5. Air Supply. Even The Nights Are Better 

6. Melissa Manchester. . . You Should Hear How She 

Talks About you 

7. Elton John Blue Eyes 

8. Juice Newton Break It To Me Gently 

9. Paul McCartney Take It Away 

10. Toto Rosanna 

11 . Michael Murphy. Whats Forever For 

12. Kenny Rogers Turn Your Love Around 

13. KarU Bonoff Personally 

We continue our look at the super-groups of the 70's 

this week on the countdown Join Danny McClain 

tonight at 9:00... on WGHI i 



mentary math, science 
and sodal studies curricu- 
lums, this sort of approa- 
ch is nothing new. "We 
are always interested in 
explonng different aven- 
ues that will stimulate a 
boy or girl to learn more, ' ' 
he said. "Students learn 
mwe by actively particip- 
ating m something than 
by just passively observ- 
ing. Plus, with a game, 
there is a little healthy 
competition between the 
children which always se- 
ems to spur additional 
motivation." 

the schod system atrives 
fn a balance between 
"mental computation, 
pencil and paper work, 
and hands-on busy 
work," Wool said. "We 
have to offer a variety of 
learning experiences in 
order to keep the child's 
attention." Wod said the 
game 'wcxild be distribu- 
ted to several beach four- 
th grade classes and wou- 
ld be evaluated by the 
teachers later in the year. 
"I've played the game 
and found it to be quite 
interesting and challeng- 
ing," Wool said. "It 
seems to reinfcx-ce many 
of the basic math skills, 
and it is really quite fiin." 

The board game, a com- 
bination, of sorts, of Yaht- 
zee and Backgammcm, 
was the brainchild of St- 
eve Fletcher and Anita 
Small of Norfdk. Rained 
in and bored one weekend 
last year, the two acciden- 
tally created the game by 
tossing a few dice while 
idling the time away. 
Realizing the potential of 



>n 



On Golden Pond: Filmed in New England. A highly recom- 
niended film about how the generations cap learn from each 
other. 

Hanry Fonda/ Bmi Actor 

KaHiarin* Hapbum/Best Actraas 

Jana Fonda 

Emaat Tliompaon/Baat Adapted Scraanplay 




ACADEMY AWARD WINNING 





TIDEWATER'S BEST SELECTION OF MOVIES FOR SALE OR RENTAL 

ffluiic Dcn 

606 Hilltop Wwt Shopping Canter (804) 422-4510 



their neation, Fletcher 
reseafctttd the marketabi- 
lity (^ his new product, 
finding that the game 
could sell. He and Small 
poded together $2,000 
and produced a limited 
run of the game. 

Fdlowing these rather 
humble beginnings, Flet- 
cher and Small hit the 
road with their product, 
making the hard sell with 
virtually every store in the 
area. For $6, Tidewater 
residents can today purc- 
hase the game at a num- 
ber of stores including 
Best Products, J.C. Pen- 
ny's, Thalheimer's, Smith 
and Welton's, Legget's 



and K and K T<^s. 
Further, the game has 
been marketed in localit- 
ies around the cmmtry, 
including New York, Atl- 
anta and Chicago. 

•We do expect to bec- 
ome millionaires with 
this," (^served Fletcher. 
"We were advised to sell 
the patent to Milton Brad- 
ley because we didn't 
have enough money to do 
it on our own, but we. felt 
lila that was selling out. 
Part of (Hir dream is to do 
it on our own," added 
Small. 

The Qaze corporation 



now consist of three oeop- 
le: Fletcher, a teacher at 
Old Cominion University, 
Small, a full-time emplo- 
yee for the ctanpany, and 
an agent«who visits vari- 
ous markets and attempts 
to sell the product. It may 
be a small business now, 
but Fletcher is satisfied 
with the growth and prog- 
ress he has witnessed so 
fiar. "There is a certain 
satisfaction to being invd- 
ved in a venture such as 
this," he said. "One 
quality above all else has 
gotten Graze to where it is 
today-persistence. We 
believe in what we are 
selling." 



I ^ |» ■ 




Game inventor Anita Small and Steve Fletcher. 



ForLynnhaven Mall 



Crafts Show Is Slated 



Lynnhaven Mall's Art 
& Craft Show is scheduled 
for Wednesday through 
Saturday. August 18-21. 



Sixty-five artists and 
craftsmen will be demon- 
^fkting their skills and Of- 
fering their handmade 



Learn Horiculture 



The \rirginla Beach De- 
partment of Agriculture/- 
Coc^rative Extension is 
spoasoring a hc»ticulture 
therapy wcH-kshc^ Wed- 
nesday, Sept. 8, 8:15 
am.m. through 3 p.m. at 
the Norfolk Botanical 
Gardens. 

This WOTKsnop IS desig- 
ned to stimulate ideas and 



directions for those who 
are exploring the ccxicept 
of hOTticultural therapy 
for use with handicapped 
and senior x:itizens. 

Fee: $10 pre-registrat- 
ion; $12 day of wcn^kshc^. 
For registration and pro- 
gram information contact 

427-4769. 



items for sale. Exhibits 
include handcarved bam- 
boo flutes, handcarved 
and handpainted decoys, 
handmade dolls, paintings 
on silk and on wood, por- 
traits of pets, carved can- 
dles, pottery, stained glass 
and handmade gran- 
dfather clocks. Displays 
will be throughout the 
malU 

The show is free and 
open to the public during 
maUhours, 10 A.M. -9:30 
P.M. Lynnhaven Mall is 
located on Lynnhaven 
Parkway, one mile south 
of the Virginia Beach Ex- 
pressway. 




$55,000 



For King William 

Art collectors in Virginia Beach have a 
little more than a month to scrape 
together $55,000 to purchase a 300 year- 
old protrait of King William. After that, 
if no takers materialize, the painting will 
be donated to the College of William and 
Mary. 

The painting is on display at Quarter- 
maine Antiques on First Colonial Road 
and Great Neck Road near Farm Fresh. 
Standing 96 inches high by 56 inches wide, 
the artwork is attributed to Sir Goddfrey 
Kneller, an English Court painter. The 
painting, authenticated by experts to date 
back to 1790, is unsigned because it was 
once damaged in afire at Warwick Castle. 

Also among the collectables at the an- 
tique store is a Hepplewhite dining table, 
circa 1870, complete with gold on which 
china from Tiffany's, circa 1876, and a 
set of Irish Chippendale chairs, circa 
I860. 




VALLE'S 

SHORE DINNER 

SPECIALS 



If you thought you couldn't affoxd a great seafood dinner, 

^ youhavetftbeentoVaU^sktely. See^j^tamffe^ence ^^ 

buying lobster and dams by the boatload can do for the price. 



* >. 



Twin Maine 
Lobsters 

Siore Dfamer 
Maine Lobster 



« _« 



I li-l 



Firied 
Whole dams 



$095 



^ 



Baked StuiFed or Boiled Comes with 




lyoui 

handle. (For one person only.) 

3 

Choice of Boiled or ftdced Stuffed 
Ld}ster and Golden Fried Cjams. 
ComM -with all die same fixins as 
above. 

OTCof our Great ValiKS. Baked 
StiJfed or Birifed. Complete with aU- 
yoo'Caxi-eat Ccwn-on-the-Cob, home- 
made Cole Slaw ainl oven baked Rolls. 



A full pkte <d tasty tender Oams. 
Qmes wtik all ti% a»ax 
finnsas^>oi^^ 




naar Pembraobe IfaO, «i-12tS. 0|Mi every dqr torn 1 1 SA. 



Video Views 



Courtesy of Musk Den 

TRmUTE - is Scottie's story - the p«trait of a dying 
man who is determined to achieve a reconciliation with 
his son Jud. A sensitive, moving screenplay woven 
with moments of high comedy. 

FLASH OOUOON - an outer space fantasy adventure, is 
based cm the world famous comic strip, which comes to 
life with action, romance, comedy, and mustic by the 
popular rock group-Oueen. 

MANY ADVENTURES OF WINNIE THE POOH - It's 
back to the days of Winnie the Pooh and Christopher 
Robin. Back to blustery days, honey trees, and the 
Hundred Acre Wood. Winnie and his friends in an 
unfwgettable and rare fihn for the whole family 



Full Gospel Businessmen 
To Brunch At Ft, Story 



The Virginia Beach Ch- 
apter of the Full Gospel 
Business Men's Fellow- 
ship International will 
hdd a brunch oa Satur- 



day, August 28 at 10 a.m. 
at FOTt StOTy. 

The public is invited 
and a fee will be charged. 



Bluegrass Music, Square Dancing 
and Clogging at Fanners Market 



The Virginia Beach 
Farmer's Market oUcrs 
visitors bluegrass music, 
square dancing and 
clogging every Friday 
night from 7 to 11 p.m. 




99 



We Don't Have To Say ''Sale 
To Bring You Every Day 
SWIe Savings! « 



Even though we don't have sales, we still offer you a 
fantastic selection of unique items at incredible 
ewyday low prices. In fact, you can save 30% to 50^ 
mem h«e than you can during m<»t stores' sales! So if 
ytw're looking for a variety of valu« at bargain-hunter 
pma, look us over today. You'll save Uke crazy, 
emyday, on coUertable contemporary and antique 
jew^, watches, cameras, stereos, musical instrumen- 
ts, aiKi more! 



'^MdcQSamK Safes 



327 »«^ ^, Dwwtown PortMWutti 
Phone 399-400*— 4ltoo -Sat 9-6 




The market is located 
on Princess Anne Road, 
across from Princess Anne 
Park. 

Call 427-4395 for more 
information. 

CLASP 
To Hold 
Meeting 

ClASP(Gtizens Loving 
All Special People) will 
haid its mcHithly business 
meeting Saturday, i^gust 
21, at 8:30 p.m. Lcx:ation 
will be at the Bow Oeek 
Recreatioi Center, 3427 
Oubhouse Road, Virginia 
Beach. TTie meeting is 
being held in ccxijunction 
with the dance. 

All voting members are 
highly encouraged to at- 
tend. All other interested 
persons are also invited to 
attend. 

F« further infaniation 
call either idtm IXtty on 
424-6239 or Itarry Burd 
on 486-31 10. 



dia 



^■■■1 



■■■afl 



•»» 



^^9 



i^^^a^VWi 



•flPV 



■^^ 



^^■IP' 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, August 18, 1982 



SUN Series, Parts 



Grand Old Hotel Strives To Keep Up With Times 



Editor's note: This article is the second in- 
stallment of a three part Virginia Beach Sun series 
on the Cavalier Hotel. The series a investigating 
and future of the 54 year-old 



the past, present 
resort hotel. 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

Zoot suits once adorned the gentlemen who 
sliced up the wooden deck of the Cavalier Beach 
aub and Cabana Colony as they swooned under 
the moon with their escorts for the evenmg. Tlie 
music was swinging, and guests of the hotel 
danced the night away. 

Frank Sinatra and Jimmy Dorsey were two of 
the bigger names to perform there for the weekly 
Saturday night shindigs . As the years passed, the 
names changed from Bob Hope to Robert Cioulet 
to Elton John. WhUe aU may not have performed 
at the Oivalier Hotel, each has been a guest there 
at one time or another, as have been Phylhs 
DiUer, former first Lady Rosalyn Carter, and 
Virginia Governor Charles Robb. When in 
Virginia Beach, why do the stars stay at the 
Cavalier? Coining a phrase fi-om aie of the 
hotel's more recent celebrity guests, Muhammad 
Ali, Cavalier Vice President and General Manager 
Ed Doty explains: 

"We are, in short, the greatest," he boasts. 
Such ccHifidence has been a trademark of the 
CavaUer since its birth in 1927. Between then and 
now, however, hotel management somehow lost 
sight of the facility's grand reputatiai. In 1972, a 
syndicate which, at the time, contrdled the hotel, 
built a new, high-rise Cavalier altmg the 
oceanfi^ont and boarded up the original CavaUer, 
presumably fwever. 

"Gene Dixot, Sr. fircMn Lynchburgh bought the 
hotel from Sidney Banks in 1960, and he did a 
superb job with it," Doty recalled. "But, for 
sOTie reascm, Gene decided to lease the property 
to the syndicate. Well, those people didn't know 
too much about the hotel business, and they just 
didn't do very well with the prqxrty. When Gene 
died, Gene Jr. became president of the hotel and 
he bought the prc^erty back from the syndicate. 
That marks the period in time when the Cavalier 
got back on the right track." 

At oice, the younger Dixon began scheming to 
re-cqjen the dd Cavalier. It was to be an awesome 
undertaking, in that every stick of furniture, every 
chadelier and fixture, and every shred of carpet 
had been auctioned off. Dixon employed Ws 
brother-in-law, Boyd Colgate, to refurbish the 
run-down structure. 

"Gene had a tough decisicm to make when he 
became president," Doty said. "He could have 
made the property into a condodunium, or he 
could have made it into an dd ladies home, or he 
could even have just bulldozed the whde thing. 
"Instead, Gene took a big risk," said Doty. 
"All the studies were showing that the big 
business was going toward oceanfront property. 
We were in the middle of the 1974 Arab oil 
embargo and nobody was travelling anywhere. 
Yet, Gene had a gut feeling. I think he decided to 
remodel the hotel because he felt it would have 
been what his father wanted him to do." 

Cdgate, a self-made millionaire in the decorat- 
ing business, was brought into the fold as a 
consultant in the project. Before it was finished. 



Cdgate was appdnted vice president of the 
corporation. In 1978, the dd Cavalier became the 
newest Cavalier, opening two of its six guest 
floors for business, along with tlie dining room, 
ball room, and lobby. Today, all Of the floo-s have 
been completed and all that remains is the 
restoration of the indoor pod. The possibility of 
incorporating a heidth spa into the dd hotel is 
being kicked around as well. Doty sud. 

"Sure, it was pretty risky re-opening that old 
hotel," Doty said. "But there were so many 
people in the community who felt so kindly toward 
it that the chance, I believe, was worthwhile," 

IVeating the guests royally is the key today, just 
as it was in the dd days, according to Doty. 
"There is a cerUin segment of the wealth which 
needs to feel pampered," he said, "so that is 
what we do. In essence, we are slaves to the 
guests. And, if I ever see a beUman or a waiter 
who doesn't treat the guest Uke a king, I go kick 
him in the butt and correct the situation 
apprq;>riately." 

For Doty, people-pleasing has been a lifelong 
pursuit. From hotels in New York, Washmgton 
and ^4ashville to Kalamazoo, Michigan, the 
Cavalier vice president has been in the business 
since the 1930's, making friends with the lites of 
Harry Truman and Nat King Cde. In that tim^ 
he has develc^ed a philosophy for success. 




"You!ye~foHe4n(^e a feeling for people," he 
'You've got to remember that we have 
nothing to seU the guests that they can take away 
with them except their memoies. So, we have to 
be Uke the king's jester and be certain that those 
guests leave here smiling. 

"I went into this business during the Great 
Depression, and there were always 40 guys out 
there waiting to take my job, so I had to be good," 
Doty said. "That meant making sure the 
customer was always happy, because if he wasn't 
and my boss found out, I was gdng to be out in 
the street. The same prindple still hdds true 
today." 

The identity crisis suffered by the hotel in the 
mid-70's was a bi-product (^ mismanagement. 
Doty said. "Those guys in the syndicate, they 
just didn't understand the hotel business. It just 
wasn't in their blood. They were lawyers and 
accomtants trying to make a buck." Not so with 
the current management, according to Doty. 
"We're basically a family operation, and I 
wouldn't have it any other way. 

"What we have to sell here is our fiunily~the 
people," Doty continued. "Anybody can sell you 
some bricks and q^rtar and call it a hotel, but 
they can't give youNrtiat we've got. You won't 
find that anywhere." 




Vice Piciidcat/Gcaenl Mwnter Ed Doty 



DR. ROBERT THOMAS 

AND 

DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis 
Contact Lens & Children's Vision 

1194 S. Lynnhaveii Parkway 

468-2060 



.. vS^^^^y 




GOLDEN DOME 

FAMILY FUN CENTERS 



The CavaUer was once the only Beach resort hotel 



f Summer Book Sale To Take Place at Virginia Beach Dome 



5- 



The Friends of the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Lirary will conduct a 
special Summer Book Sale 
at the Dome on Suday, 



August 22 from noon to S 
p.m. 

Sale items will be priced 
from 1(K 

The sale has been 



organized by local teens in 
conjunction with the 
Friends. 

The Dome is located at 
Padfic and 19th Streets in 



the Oceanfront area of 
Virginia Beach. Call 464- 



9280 for more infor- 
mation. 



mifmRKRKRK RKRKRKIWRKimRKRKminC 

RK*S CITY WIDE 

USED CAR 




SALE 




MERCURY COUGAR 2 DR 

Auto, power steering, 
power hraka, AM and 

FM cassette, tuca^ 

No. 6005A »15y5 



OLI^cMlLASS4DR 

Auto, power steering, 
power brakes, No. 6737B 

$2295 



1978 BUICK SKYLARK 

Auto, power storing, 

power brakes, ur cond.. 

Vinyl roof. No. e903A 

$2975 



1977 
FORD THUND^BIRD 

Auto, powo- steertt^, 
power brak«, air amd., 
N0.7459A 13495 



1978 FORD FIESTA 

4 cy., 4 spd., sunroof. No. 
7294A 

$2975 



1977DATSUNB210 

4cy.,4spd.,No.69S4A 

$2^5 



1977 
CHEVROLET CAMARO 

Auto, pow& steoing, 
powo- brakes, idr cond., 

N0.7I53B $^75 



1981 THUNDERmRD 

Red, a dassic, Icmded, 
N0.7232A 

$6775 



HURRY - Sale Ends Monday A^ 23 





MClKNNMtMt niMlMIMI MKRK Ml RK mm 




PHILIP LIEBMAN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

THE HERITAGE-ROSEMONT BUILDING 

SUITE 201 

708 SOUTH ROSEMONT ROAI> 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

804-463-4722 



J2^ 



•RESiraENTIAL REAL ESTATE 
TRANSACTION 

ASSUMPTIONS 
WRAP-MORTO AOl . 
NEW FINANCING 

•AUTO M:;CIDENT/PlKim«At 
INJURY 

ONE THIRD OF RBCX) VERY 



•DIVORCE (UNCONTWTED) $175 
•aiP AR ATION AOREEMENT 85 

•kk:ial security ^NTwoiNCY 



EXPERIENCE!^ PROFESSIONAL 
PERSONAL ATTmrriON 



^t^^^^m^m^ 



Vvfiiua Beach Sim. Ai^iBt 18. 1M2 7 



Beach Gardenlns 



5 ■ 




arrner's Market 




ake The Best Of Your Fresh Vegetables 



r 



Sun 


^^H 


Flower 


^^[ 


^■nckEHcHiMAanl 
DwisTraat 


^hBH^^^^^^^p^^^^^^^^^^^H 



l_ 



M 



Juicy tomatoes, trec^qioied peactes, tasty 
sweet a>ra, vine-ripemd ii^>iis ai^ cnmcby 
cucumbo^-ttw freshocB of Virgiiiia Beadi 
grown produce is one of tlie ddights of sum- 
mer. 

Such fruits and v^etables are now available 
not just to home gardaiers. but to all ccm- 
sumers in Virginia Beach throi^ FarmCT's 



Market, roadside markets, and "U-Pick" 
farms. 

To ke^ this iH'oduce fresh and to maintain 
nutritive values, follow these storage 
procedures: 

• Many fruits and vegetables ke^ just in the 
refrigerator. These include apples. 



and 



Lduje's 



Your Household Word 



:a 




PUttfW 

•vfMrayou 

wmnHwm 

thiBuHn- 

qui9t9- ap09d 

hiuHMUi 

necktw 
vwUcalaIr 
cMrscfton. 
Save $2,491 ir 
Ociltotlng 
Fan .... 

itogutarfy $22.46. Ea^ assembly & 
d»assentf)ly for storage. #39577 

SM.MI Gdilc Mout Power Roof 

Vcat NOi 30987 Reg. $4«.tS, .$3t.SI 

Swrt $10.M!LaiieBoof Mout Power 

Vcat No. 3098S Reg. $54.97, .$44.97 

Save $5.Ml 3-S»eed (iedilatiiit 

Fu No. 39S76 Reg. $19.97 $14.97 

Sovc'S.M! 16-hMhOKaiatiBgFaB 
No.39578 Reg. $29.97, .$24.97 



AHOfOur 
FutsAn 




»19 



97 



Gather Soil Samples For Testing 



Now is Uie time to 
gatlwr pasture txA tarn- 
fries fcMT teAJi^. Tim in* 
surcs that Viigmia Beach 
farmers will loiow the 
o(»rect amounts of lime 
and f ertiUaer to i^ipljr for 
establishment or main- 
toumce of pastures or 
hay^ds. ^bo, SqKem- 
ber is the best time to seed 



or ftoome most crops in 
our area. 

Soil testing is offered 
free by the Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriculture/Coc^xrative 
ExtensiiMi Service. Using 
their recommendations 
win save producers money 
by preventing excessive 
use of fotilizas or lime. 



while guanmtedng that 
emMi^ of tlKse ivoducts 
are used to keq) pastures 
from becoming run-down 
aiKl unproductive. 

Ffx further infwm^on 
contact tl» Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriculture/Co(^}CTative 
Extenaon Service at 427- 
4769. 



OwfrnmwU 
kmpfoucool 

i ootBtwttblt. 

Tmof^ adtf a dtconilvt 
hmchtomnyroomlnyotrhomel 

Save $10! 36" White 
Contemporary $QQ97 
Celling pan . . . ^9 

Regularly $39.97. 3 alumimim blades 
vid five-speed waH control. #31704 

Save $10.00! 48" Browa CeOiag Fan 

No.31712 Reg. $79.97, J^.97 I 

Save $30,001 52" Aaliqae Brass Cdliag 

Faa No. 31725 Reg. $119.97, $t9^7 

Save $40,001 34" Aaliqac Brass CtOmg 

Faa N0.3173S Reg. $139.97 J99.97 

Save $50.00! 52" AatfiiaeOrPoMMd 
No. 31745, 7 Reg. $179.97,$1».97 



VtoGlNlAWiACH 

4560 Bonney Road 
INDEPENDENCE BLVD. NEAR 1-44 

4.* ^Pfcone 497-0081:.^ ... . c _ ,^ „ , ^ 
7:30-8:00 MON.-FRI., 8:00-5:00 SAT. 

CHESAPEAKE 

1752 South MiUtary Hwy. 
BETWEEN GREENBRIER PKWY 
AND BATTLEHELD BLVD. 
Phone 420-1660 
7:30^:00 MON.-FRI., 8:0(M:O0SAT. 




M 




Welcome 

To The 
World 




Stuff.., 

. . . where the warmth of wood and fine 
craftsmanship coupled with functional, yet 
elegant design provide the best value for 

furniture for your home or office. 

Ti(ffSta4fffurnituiie is denned to last and la^. 

First, it is made from the finest grade of 

sturdy yellow pine available. Abo, anytime 

y<m choose, you can change your entire 

living room decor by simply recovering 

your cushions, l^llar for dollar, tuff Sttiff 

is your best buy in furniture in T^kwater. 

We have many imitators, but no one can 

hMaamdktaTW^^' Wemea^tfldmt 

that you willer^joy tfw quality and good 

lool^ of our furniture. Once you enter the 

world of Ttrff S^f it will be a lifelong 
e^q^rwnfx. Thank you! 



B.F. Bell 

House Jacking 

& Raising 
Structural Repair 

Brick or Frame 

also 
Jacking Fireplaces Back 

To House 

622-1771 & 622-8396 



^ OUT SALE! 

1/5 WHITE 

O FARM SUPPLY inc 

^1 1632 Debaun Ave 

r \ Chcsaj^akc, Va. 




547-2188 




Save Up To ^700 

on Bolens Mowers 

•Walk Behiiid*Rear Engine 
•Tractor Styles 



8 Different Models 
To Choose From 



O 

I 



Only 



FlnaKSis 
AvaikMe 

Tiies.A^.31 



Ignited quantities 
(m cotain modek 




^nbm^^ ««^^f Cmtmr VbtMa ita^ 
HomidM. 49MmS 



B0LEN5 



berries, peaches, sweet corn, carrots, 
leafy greoi vegetables such as lettuce. 

• Otho^, however, are a>id-seiisitive and 
adversely affected by low temperatures— 
they will do betto^ stored in the open, if the 
nxHn temporature is below 70*. Bananas 
and other trofnod fruits, water melons, 
cucumbers, eggplants, peppers, winter 
squash, ripe tomatoes, sweet |K)tatoes, and 
dtnis fruits are all in this category. 

• Keep in nmd certain storage incom- 
patibilities. Apples, tomatoes, and 
mdons, which give off ethylene gas should 
not be stored near carrots, because the gas 
will cause the carrots to take on a bitter 
taste. 

• If space is limited, and apples and carrots 
must be stored in the same area, put the 
carrots in a irfastic bag to preserve their 
flavor. Onions and cabbi^es should not be 
stored near milk or eggs which culd take on 
the flavor of these strong smelling 
v^^ables. 

Small Appliance Workshop 

Hie Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Agriculture 
will conduct a small ap- 
pliance repair workshop in 
Wednesday, August 18 
from 10 a.m. to 12 aooa at 
the VPI annex on Bird- 



neck Road. 

Guest speaker will be 
Charlie Bachelder. 

A fee wil be charged. 
Call 427-4511 for more 
information. 



Lawn Care Classes 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriodture/Cooperative 
Ejrtenacm Service will of- 
fer a lawn establishment 
dass on Tuesday, Sept. 7, 
1982. from 7 through 9 
p.m. and a lawn main- 
teoMace class on Thur- 
Sjd^. S!?Rt, 9, fronp 7 - 9 
p.m. These dasses are 



free of charge. They will 
be hdd in the Agriculture 
Building. >%ginia Beach 
Municipal Center. 

To register, or for more 
information contact the 
Virginia Beach Depar- 
tment of 
Agriculture/Cooperative 
Extension Service at 427- 
4769. 



Free Lawn Tests 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of 

AgikuIture/Co(q>erative 
Extension Service wiO test 
s(h1 for lawns and gardens 
fireeofdiarge. 

Sdl for fall v^etable 
gaidens and fescue lawns 
should be tested mw for 
nutrients and the need for 



lime. Soil samples can be 
dropped off at the 
VirgiQia Beach Depar- 
tment of Agriculture, 
Agriculture Building, 
Virginia Beach Munidpal 
Center, any Virginia 
Beach Library, Tim- 
bolake Nursoy, or Lon- 
don Mdge Nursery. 



Clean As You 
Can Get 

Commercial & Residential Cleaning 
One Time or by Contract 

340-4718 
428-4291 
340-0236 




Z74iUiittFecRoad 
VaB«ch.VA23452 




R J.R. FABRICS 

ALTERATIONS AND SEWING 



i 



WE BUY, SELL & TRADE 
ANYBABYITEMS 

EABV fURNinJM; CLOTHING. TOVS 



F^WAI^USBD 
MANYU^B«$« 



,-# 



^^m 



m^i^m 



^f^i^ 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, August 18, 1982 




■y Beach Librariu Carotya Caywood 



Shakespeare 
Fest Set 
For Beach 



Virginia Beach residents who like Shakespeare are 
going to have a good August. 

"The Taming of the Shrew" and "Rcrnieo and 
Juliet" will be playing at the Virginia Beach Pavilicn^ 
from August 27 to Sep. 5. 

A cast of local actors and actresses will perform in 

: these two great love stories of comedy and tragedy. 

, The Performing Arts Unit of the Qty Department of 

Parks and Recreaticm has spcmsored the Festivl for 

five years now, and this may be the best ever. Ticket 

information can be obtained by calUng 428-8000. 

For even more plays residents can turn to the 
Virginia Shakespeare Festival in Williamsburg. "The 
Merry Wives of Windsor," "All'd Well that Ends 
Well," and "Richard III" are being presented at the 
College of William and Mary. The two comedies and 
the villainous history of Richard will run through 
August 22. For information on special perfcffmances 
including a discussion, a backstage tour and a 
children's matinee call 1-253-4469. 

To increase understanding and enjoyment playgoers 
may want to come to the library. Both the printed text 
and recorded versions of many of the plays are 
available, as are notes, commentaries, guidebooks and 
criticism. Authors have psychoanalyzed Shakespeare's 
characters, illustrated the flowers he mentions, and 
based fiction on the little that is known of his life. In 
fact, so much has been written that the Bard of Avon 
gets his own Dewey Decimal Number, 822.33. 

For those who are unfamiliar with the plot of a 
particular play Lamb's "Tales Frcmi Shakespeare" is a 
good place to begin. As a good Victorian, Charles 
Lamb found parts of the plays to lack refinement and 
his "Tales" skip over some episodes. Still they are 
very readable and make involved intrigues much 
clearer. Marchette Chute provides a more modern 
collection in "Stwies From Shakespeare." Both books 
are often used to introduce the plays to children. 

The settings in which these plays were first 
performed was quite different from what we see now. 
"Shakespeare's Theater" by Hodges uses delightful 
color illustrations to show how the playwrite expected 
them to be staged. The everyday life and conditions of 
his time are portrayed in "Shakespeare's England." 
Research about the man himself, the legends that 
became accepted were facts were; lacking, and the 
controversy over whether a middle-class merchant's 
son was capable of writing the finest works of English 
literature are all admirably detailed in "Shakespeare's 1 
Lives by Schoenbaum. 

Library materials can enhance appreciation of these 
plays and many other cultural events. But playgoers 
shouldn't treat Shakespeare as schodwork. He was the 
boxoffice hit of the seventeenth century. 



Hugh Barton Attends 



Hugh Barton, manager 
of the Virginia Beach 
Convention Bureau, was 
among the more than 300 
participants at the recent 
International Association 
of Convention and Visito- 
Bureaus' 69th annual coi- 
venticMi in Philadelphia. 

This year's conventim 
theme centered cm how 
developments in high tec- 
hndogy and teleccmmun- 
ications affect individual 
conventi<Mi and visitor bu- 
reaus and the industry at 
large. In additim to 
computer-related semin- 
ars and works hc^s. Bar- 
ton also took part in 



sessi<xis focusing on con- 
vention sales, tourism 
promc^ioi, international 
marketing and member- 
ship. 

The International Asso- 
ciation of Convention and 
VisitCH- Bureaus (L\CVB) 
was founded in 1914 iac 
the purpose of promoting 
sound professional practi- 
ces in travel marketing 
and in the soUcitation and 
servicing of meetings and 
c<» ve nticRis . lACVB 
comprises 171 member 
bureaus in the United 
States and 13 other ccHin- 
tries. BartCHi is a profes- 
sional member of lACVB. 



Runaway Volunteers Needed 



The Virginia Beach 
Lighthouse Runaway 
Hotline is in nMd of 
volunteers to atd^faanilies 
in distress. Individual are 
now being accepted for an 
upcoming training class. 

The Hotline, sponsored 
by the Virginia Beach 
Juvenile and Domestic 
Relations District Court's 
CHversion Unit, offers a 
telephone number who-e 
ytmth and i^rents may 
talk with a caring person 
about the problems thQr 



are facing. Voiimteers are 
trained to aid in crisis 
situations relating to 
parenting issues, drug and 
alcohol abuse, sexual 
abuse, suicide, family 
violence, and adolescent 
issues. 

If you are intemted in 
learning more about 
volunteering with the 
Lighthouse Runaway 
Hotline, contact Terrie 
Basgier, Hotline Coor- 
dinator, at 427-86^. 



Renter At Purdue 



"Hie Purdue University 
DeiMrtment of ^nds has 
Miaounced that* Stephen 
Rentner oi \%ginia. Beach 
has been Mxepted for 
membership in the Pur- 
diK University Bands, 

He {days d>oe in the 



Ckeen Run Ifigh Schod 
Band and if the son (^ 
Richard Rentner. 

Freshn^n accepted into 
this o^antzMkA are sel- 
ected on the dual bases of 
musMuU b^Jsground ud 
andemfc aWfty. 



GEORGIA'S 
HAIRSTYLES 



468-3440 

. LADIES: 
OonH Mis* V*ur 'Soap' 
On C«l»r^TV<! 



INTRODUCTORY FREE FACIAL 

I Haircut & 



OIL OF MIMK 
SKIM CARE PROOHAM 

Call for Appt. 



PERM 

I Beg '30 

' IncI Cut, Blow Dry or S«t 



•27M 



I 



JMllM THIf COUPjML . 
^•EXPIRES August 2«, 1982 ■ 

Ca* Anuo tor Ap(it. I 



I Blow Dry . . ■S.SO | 

I Haircut *B.OO | 

I Military I 

I Cut •3.00 I 

I Shampoo & | 

I Set 'S-OO I 

I Haircut & I 

I Set •S.OO 2 

WITH THIS COUPON- * 

!EXPIIUE:SAugiMl28,lM2 



ON THE 



AIR 



AND 




IN THE SUN 



WITH DANNY McCLAINl 



Call Ahca4 lor Hppt 



■■a B. I.VNNHAVBM MOAO (Next to Michelle's) 
HOURS; TU£S. WEO. FRI 10-8. THUR lOa SAT 9-5 




anquet Facilities ' 
A vailable 



NICK'S 

STEAK & SEAFOOD 
1125 S. Military Hwy 

(FRESHLY CUT ON PREMISES) 

8 oz. U.S.D.A. 
CHOICE 

DELMONICO STEAK 

ONLY 

$^95 



72 LOCATIONS TO GET 
YOUR VIRGINDV BEACH SUN 



with 

BAKED POTATO'SOUR CREAM 

BREAD* AND PLENTY OF BUTTER 

Come Enjoy Family-Style 
Cooking In A Family 
Atmosphere Tonight. 

420-1400 

6 a.m. - 10 p.m. 
7 Days 



3 



HANDY 

SUBSCRIBER 

FORM 

INSIDE 




FOOD STORES 



PICK-UP 

YOUR COPY 

OF THE 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

SUN TODAY 

24 HOURS 

A DAY 
7 DAYS A 

WEEK 



THE SOUTHLAND CORPORATION 
The Virginia Beach Sun is available at almost every 7-ELEVEN 
Store in Virginia Beach ...Plus the following Virginia Beach 
locations: 



• Home of Gif U 23rd A Atlantic 

• Put Omce 24th A Adantic 

• Ncwi Ccatcr 23rd A Atlantic 
•Holiday Ian 2Stli A Oceanfront 

• lagnuB* Pkanaacy 25th Street 

• Priaccn Ann Motel 25th A Oceanfront 

• The Seahawk Motel 26ih A Oceanfront 

• SfaBiBOBs Photo 25th A Atkntic 

• Flmldc Book Shop 3113 Pacific 

• Peter Pancakes 33rd A Atlantic 
fS h w a ton Motel 36th,A Oceanfront 

I Ina 57th A Oceanfront 

• PmvIm Drags 9*0 LasUn Road 
r of Commerce Pembroke Mall 

• Mttag Pendiroke Meadow Independence Blvd. 

• Laiw Wright Motel Rt. 13, N. Hampton Blvd. 




• Revco-Grcat NackRd.VmafeCealer 

• Va. Beach Gca. Hom. First CoioBlal Rd. 
•Big Star First Colonial A LaaUn 

• Earlea (Wcttcra Aato) Va. Beach Hvd. 

• Peoples Drags Priaccss Ana Ceater 

• VlrglBia Beach Saa oflkc Roaeawat Rd. 

• Rerco A A.P. Raseaioal A S. Plata Tr. 

• Peoples Drags HoOand Phua Hollaad Rd. 

• Wlaa DUe-Ljraahavea Parkway Ceater 

• Fans Flash - Ljnahavea Pky. Manor Sq. 

• Safemy Lyaahavea A HoBaad 

• HoMay Ian Park, Geaeral Booth Blvd. 

• RaaMda laa, Cst. AOceaaflval 

• lUtoa IBB Sth A Ocstttfraat 

• Barr»-Phaiaaar 17th A AHailk 

• Holiday laa 3nh St A Oceaaftvat 



•^^""S 

^9F 



%^ 



I 

The Bar-B-Que Barn 

• Daily Luncheon Specials 

• Daily Luncheon, Speciab 
• Mon. NIte - Bar-Bmoe 

• Wed. Nitc- Ribs 

Catering - Specializing 
In "Pig Pick 'ns" 

487-7407 

Rt. 17 at the Bridge in 
Deep Creek 



Ann'n Judy's Boutiqae 

• Frog Pond • Barclay Square 

• Davey Bags ••DeWeese 

• Jeanne Bucheven 

426-2800 

At Judy's Hair Designos 

Pungo Square Shoping Colter 

Pungo 



Charlie's Seafood 
Restaurant 

3 139 Shore Drive 
Virginia Beach 

491-9863 

MaryE.Rehpdz 

and Employees 



The Old General Store 

Calico Fabrics, Handicrqfts, 

Handicraft Supplies and Gifts 

Select Aatiqacs A Rcfiatahii^ 

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Tata. 

BaMcfleldBlvd.atSt. 

St. 



There was a time when rivers slowed mem'a 
journey. Now we speed acrc»s them going to and 
from our work . . . witfi hardly a thought for the 
cfiglneering genius wNch has enabled man to 
span every river with his bridges. 

In our jourrwy through life there are times 
when we face hazards or frustrations. For mil- 
lions, rel^ious faith has been the bridge to new 
horinins or opportunity and reriizAion. 

You need, your family needs, the spiritud 
stimulation and enrichment your place of 
worsh^ can provide. The ^sources gained can 
^Mntfie week. 



AND HOnUE 



Copyrt^ iaS2 KaMw Adwwtiing 
P O. Bm S024. ChaftoOwnat, 





RrttCtitoe. 



In Serw You 






The Hair People 

Men... Women... Children 

Potnanents, Coloring, Soling 

Daily 8-3 

Tues. and Thurs. Evenings 

420-5350 

3300 Provideoce Road 
Fairfield Square 
Virginia Bnch 



Judy's Hair DericBcrg 

■ 'Creative HairstyUng For 

Mend Women" 

• Skin Care • Redkot ProducU 

•Boati^ 

426-2800 

Pungo Square topping CeatCT 
Pungo. 



Overton's MariMt 

1419 ^sjadet^ Street 
Chesapttke 

545-9496 

27w (Overton 's and /Tfmpfnjnsar 
ToMEbcMeCo. 

23llli«teiUeRo«l 

Bnu^f^neA^^miem, 
TVM,fUmm 



Baclutafc Boatfqm, Ltd. 

Dance-OynuusUfi 

Fitness AiHDVH 

Thtalrkol Props and ^ipplies 

Mon. -Fri. 10 to 6 

Sat. 10 to 3 

497-4579 

323 KemptviUe Plaza 

Shopping Center 

Princess Anne Road 

Near Witchduck Road 

Virginia Beach 



Paul's Pfawc Halrcntten 

MenAWmnen 
6 Days i^us Wed. A Thurs. Nites 

424-1987 or 420-8840 

2 Blocks Mfttt qf Indian River 

Shon>ingCtntm' 

Next to Solar Car Wash 



Babylaml 

• New and like new baby 
furniture A accesswies 

• Oiild Line A Jenny L^in CrilM 

• OtiUien't Pre-Owned Oothes 

Oto6X 

We also Buy, Ptek-up 

andDdiva 

420-3344 ' 

Indian River Sion>ing Center 
Chesapeake 



PsBfO Pvwtr Equipment 

• Soqiper &ks A Service 

•Live Bait A Tackle 

• Lawn Mower Icpain 

• BeddbignaAs 

426-5306 

ITMPitocaMAucRoad 
Paaga 

MU-EBd 

4740 Virtfafat Beach Blvd. 
Viqii^ Beach 

^7-4^4 

Ttj/hr B. Carr 



fttex'tPlaitererafU 

* Hobby lumi 

•FWAed^OM 

•MoM^ctesses 

Moa.-Pri.lOto9 

468-3416 

UUtkwmRmS^im 
SM.M-ilH.14 



niaij^hiBoad 
vir^i 



OS^Sl 



i^^K^ 



'-■*--- 



Virgmia BewAk Sun, August 18, 1^2 9 



Beacher Fred Hall Says Watch Out For FlyingBug 



By Jackie Matthews 
SunCorrespoadent 

Virginia Beach residents 
do QOt have to be pilots to 
fly a plane. They can fly 
replica's as large or as 



small as you am build. 

During August the 
Tidewater Radio Dnitrol 
Society will host anawnial 
meet in Vir^nia Beadi. 
Members of the AMA, 
Academy of Model 



ON THE 



AIR 



AND 




IN THE SUN 



WITH DANNY McCLAINI 



The Baby's Room 

Now Open 

RENT-BUY-SELL 

Law prices on New <& Used 
Baby items... 

London Bridge 'v\^' 

Va. Beach Blvd. by 3 
Great Neck Rd. 5rx- 



486-6544 



JL. 




SAVE UP TO 50% 
Wholesale Prices on 

Antiques, Collectibles And 
18th Century REPRooucnoNS 

Queen Anne, Chippendale, etc. 
Significant collection of exceptional quality. 

QUARTERMAINE GALLERIE S, LxD . 

481-6891 WWP^ 

Open Mon.-Sat. 10-7 | ™ | 




2154 Great Neck Square Shopping Center 
(corner Great Neck Rd. and 1st ColotMi 



mm 



Anything 




$:^ 



Antiques & CoUectibiM 



Moving Sale 

Aug. 18-28 

20«7o Off 



All Stock 

(Except Consignments) 

While It Lasts!! 



Wed. - Sat. 1 1 - 5 PM. 
Thurs. 11-9PM. 

(804) 340-9706 

2605 VA. BEACH BLVD. 



Aeronautics, will bring 
their airplanes to be 
jud^. Tlie jud^hig will 
be oaade on originality and 
flight of their planes. 
These model pliin« not 
(Uty have to look like the 
real thing, but must also 
perform like the real 
jdane. Thwe* are over 
6S,000 members of the 
Natimiai Organization of 
theAMA. 

Fred HaU. of Palace 
Oreen Boulevard and 
resident of Virginia 
Beach for 21 years, has 
becmne very involved in 
Hwyipiing some of these 
model airplanes. Hall 
flew Piper Cubs and 
Aeronca's long before he 
drove a car. He became 
interated in airplanes at 
age six, when his dad built 
him one from an orange 
cnue. While a junior in 
high school the airplane 
bug bit again when a 
teacher very hit^ested in 
flying taught all his willing 
students about aviation. 

Hall mjoyed the art of 
model building but found 
it difficult to And the 
l^ans or kits of the planes 
he wanted to build. He 
dedded if he could not 
find what he wanted, he 
would design the models 
himself. 

Starting in 19S3 he 
deagned and biiilt many 
of the U-control airpkum. 
By 1963 he was chdlenged 



by the radio coiUrol air- 
planM, as tb^ were moK 
comiriicated. The latest 
model was flnished in 
August, 1981. A Curtiss 
SB 2C Helldiver. It has a 
7S-inch wing span with a 
sode replica oiXVi inch to 
the foot. The HeUdivo- 
engine develops oNfx one 
ht^se power and has all 
the scale features of the 
realHeUdiver. 

With the six channd 
radio control the flyer 
easily controls all 
operations such as the dive 
breaks, flaps, landing 
gear, throttle, rutter, 
elebator, ailerons and 
even droi» bombs. 

Hall deigns his plans 
under the name of World 
Aviation Classics. He is 
very proud of the two 
planes he has copywrited, 
the BF 109 German 
Fighter and the Curtiss 
Helldiver. Currently on 
his drawing board is the 
PT 19 inline engine, the 
PT 23 radial engine and 
the PT 26 canapy inline 
engine. These three plaiMS 
were all used in World 
War II as primary trainers 
by the United States and 
Canada. It takes many 
precious hours of resetuch 
and drawing to design one 
of these model planes. 

Hall uses an airpUme 
manual printed in 1943, 
along with other books 
he's acquired. Hisresear- 




CurtissSB2C HeUdiver 



ch sometimes takes hime 
to the Library of 
Congress, as well as many 
air museums to make sure 
his planes are authentic. 
Not only does he receive 
the satisfaction reward of 
completing such a project, 
but others also using plans 
such as his can say they 
too have built and flown 



their own plane. 

The latest AMA survey 
shows that approximately 
40Vo of the people perfer 
to scratch build their own 
models. This means they 
pick up the plans, pur- 
chase their own materials 
and start to build. An 
average member of the 



AMA builds three modeb 
a year. This hobby is very 
widespread. In a years 
time 32,000 people will 
purchase one .99 cu inch 
displacement engine for 
their favorite model, the 
survey estimates in the 
next year $19,000 will be 
spent in hobby shops and 
$16,300 spent through 



mail orders for models 
and model related sup- 
plies. 



People like Fred Hall 
say, "watch out for the 
flying bug, if it ever bites 
you, you'll have it for 
Ufe.". 



Aluminum Recycling Center To Open New Warehouse Aug. 24 On Greenwich Road 



Virginia Beach. Va., August 12, 1982— Hoffnum 
Beverage Co., the distributor of Anheuser-Busch beers 
to the Tidewater area, will open the area's newest 
recycling center, Tuesday, August 24, at the fu-m's 
warehouse, S4S6 Greenwich Road, Virginia Beach. 

"Our center will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 
pjn. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and we will 
be paying 20 cents a pound ~ or slightly less than a pen- 



Motorcycle Jackets - Leather Panis, 
Vests, Chaps Western and ttker's Boots 

T.R.'s LEATHER RACK 



^^ Western Shirts, 

^^t2l Belts & Wallets 

1110 S. MUitary Hwy., Chesapeake 424-4676 

DtoacUoM: Put CoUefc Park ShQppii« Center South "Look for Hue 
Trailer on Top of Our Buildint." 




ny for each aluminum can brought in," Larry Suttou, 
vice president and general manager, said. "I want to 
emphasize that we will accept all aluminum beverage 
cans, not just those for Budweiser and our other 
Anheuser-Busch beers. ' ' 

The recychng center is part of a national program in- 
volving Container Recovery Corp. (CRC), the 
aluminum recycling subsidiary of the Anheuser-Busch 
Companies, and participating Anheuser-Busch 
wholesalers. In 1981, the program resuUed in the re-use 
of 1 10 million pounds of aluminum, or the equivalent of 
2.4 billion aluminum cans. 



"Recycling is a good way to combat litter, but it also 
helps conserve energy," Sutton said. "In fact, a can 
made from recycled aluminum requires only 5 percent 
as much energy as one manufactured from aluminum 
ore. 

"We're confident that this center will make a 
meaningful contribution to our community, and 
provide a source of supplementary income to groups 
and individuals who recycled, as well," he added. 

^\nlieuser-Bvsch, Inc. . the, ,world,'s largest brewer, 
produces Budwelscrr Buiiwciser Light, Michelob. 
Michelob Light, Natural Light and Busch beers. 



C & P To Begin New Billing Statement System 



Beginning this month, 
C & P Telephone is intro- 
ducing a new telephone 
bill statement which gives 
customers more informa- 
tion about discounts and 
charges that apply to long 
distance calls. 

A series of codes will 
appear on the "Itemized 



Calls" part of the bill. 

The codes, explained on 
the back of the bill, indic- 
ate whether a call was 
billed at an evening ox 
weekend rate and if serv- 
ice charges applied fw 
person-to-person or other 
operator-assisted calls. 
Multirated calls, which 



NEW 

HAIR GROWTH 

is possible with 

JOJOBA PRO. 

SHAM^M) & TREATMENT 

WU abo hdp cfimlutc cxccH 
hair loss, OVf»-PROCESSED 

hair, daadrnff, a|»IU cmIs, 

fcaborrtea, Itehy scalp, Mttte 

h^ aod pMMteib. 

JoliA* Pro ii M9Cite taOMB U 

cMtalM teacaM 11aclwc«f Oc 




AVAILAMJ; 0NLY1N BEAUTY SALONS 



HU Onbodiy Mid Deborah 
Ncwhir af Onuigc Bowl Salon 
■n m^a% aboBl BUI's new 
hair frearth aad Ibc tacccss of 
Jojota Pro Shampoo aad 
TrcalaMat. 

Call 463-3303 

Far acarat locatloa of 

the & paitk^attiq Sdoa«. 



PUBLIC AUCTION 
AUGUST 21st 

1969 PONTUC-4 DR. SD. 

I.D. 23569^122709 

1974 CHE VROLET-U>R. SD. 

I.D.1X27H4W216412 

1973 (XJ)6MCNnL&2 im. HT. 

I.D. 3F37K^M391S17 

A-1 Auto Repair 
204 1st Colonial Rd. 
Va. Beach 422-8532 



begin in a discount period 
and end in a standard 
period, for example, also 
would be indicated by a 
special code. 

C & P changed the way 
in which it bills interstate 
long distance calls last 
April. Pricff to the chan- 
ge, a call which began 
during a discount period - 
7:59 a.m., for example ~ 
would be billed at the 
discount rate for the dura- 
tiMi of the call, regardless 
of how long it lasted. 
Now, calls that begin in a 
discounted period, such a 
7:59 a.m., would be billed 
at the discount rate fcM* 
only one minute and at the 
higher rate for the rest of 
the call.) 

C & P devel(^d the 
new bill format after surv- 
eying consumer groups to 
learn what discount info- 
rmatiai custcaners desir- 
ed on their phone bills. 

"We found that custo- 



mers wanted to know 
which discount rates appl- 
ied to their calls, but the 
bill format v < were usi ig 
noted only v he n discounts 
applied, without specify- 
ing the am(Mmt," Berry 
explained. 

Actually, the bill format 
C& P had been using was 
an interim design. Prior 
to the introducticxi of mul- 
ti-rated billing, C & Fs 
long distance bills showed 
specific discount amou- 
nts. 

"We couldn't continue 
to give that kind of detail 
without adding extra pa- 
ges to the bill, at a cost of 
vaact. than $1 miUicai a 
year, which ultimately cu- 
stomers would bear," B<* 
Berry of C&P said. "We 
believe the new fc»inat 
will satisfy cnir custcxners' 
needs for informaticai and 
our objective ioc conserv- 
ing costs at the same 
time." 



Friday Bazar 




Tidewater *s Only Store Carrying A Comphte Line Of 

Imports Middle East Foods 

SPICES. CHEESE, CANNED GOODS AND MORE FROM 
LEBANON, EGYPT, GREECE, PAKISTAN, AND PERSIA 



OPEN 
DAILY 

11a.m. 
to 

9 p.m. 





rand Opening 
^Special 

\^1TA BREAD 75^ 
ALL ^ICES ii% MXX)W 

mmaLMMuxtTwcm 




PHONE 

804 
497-6611 



533 Newtown Rd. at Lake Edward Mvtf^Suite 1 19 
Vir^nia B^^, Va. ^3462 



Leii^ure 

Away, 

Ltd. 

We are the Factory^] 

that Specializes in 

Quality Hot Tubs 

and Waterbeds 

Custom Built to your 

Personalized Design, 




HOT TUB *1795®'' 
WATER BED »245°'* 



Pre - Opening Sale! ! 

AUMerchand, c and Ao^sories at Sp^ual Below Factory Prices. 
Also $50.00 She .ts Free with Purchase of Watcrbed. 



Phone: 804 484-9540 



Leii.ie Away, Ltd. 
3586 Townc Point Rd. 

(wan to am>ost Ofrax in Owrchtaad} 

Portsmouth, VA. 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, August 18. 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



Classified Ads 



Public HMiIng 



: 



NMcNMriHg 



Public NmHiv 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals withh 
conduct a Public Hedring on Wednesday, September 1, 
1982, at 7:30 P.M., in the Council Chambers of the Qty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. TTje staff briefing will be at 7:00 P.M. in the 
Qty Manager's Qmference Room. . The following 
applicaticHis will appear on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . Joseph F. Nagy requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in fi'ont of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street ai Lot 190, Secticm 2, Kings 
Grant, 60S Kings Cf4i^ Noad. Lynnhaven B<n-ough. 

2. Christopher Development Company requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 foot firont yard setback 
instead of 30 feet as required cxi Lot 6, Block A, Phase 
5-B, Lake Christc^her, 5109 Park Lake Court. 
Kempsville BOTOugh. 

3. J. E. Hurst J(mes requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required front yard setback cm Lot 10, 
Section 7, Part 2, Kings Grant, 808 Arrow Qrcle. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

4. LBR, formerly Multinational, Inc. requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 7 foot side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 10 feet as required and to allow parking 
in a required setback where prdiibited when a 
commercial zoning district adjdns an apartment district 
(west side) on Site A and B, Birdneck Area, Laskin 
Road. Lynnhaven Bixough. 

5. The Franciscus Co., Inc. requests a variance of 3.5 
feet to a 26.5 foot frcmt yard setback instead of 30 feet 
as required (seccwid stcxy deck) cm Lot 10, Block 19, 
Croatan Beach, 602 Vanderbilt Avenue. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

6. James B. Dadson requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback (nc»th side) instead of 10 feet as 
required and of 5 feet to a 15 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (Carribbean Avenue) instead of 20 feet as 
required (swimming pocA on Lots 37 and 39) and of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in required front yard setbacks (both 
Greensboro Avenue and Gddsboro Avenue) and of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a 
street (Carribbean Avenue) and to allow the 6 foot fence 
to encroach into the visibility triangle at the intersecticHi 
of Golds boro and Carribbean Avenues instead of a 
fence 30 inches in height as allowed on Lot 37, 38, 39 
and 40. Block 42, Shadowlawn Heights, 103 Carribbean 
Avenue and Golds bwo Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

7. John and Jeanne A. Barfield request a variance of 2 
feet to a 3 foot side yard setback (south side) iiutead of 
5 feet as required and of 7 feet to a 3 foot rear yard 
setback instead of 10 feet as required (accessra-y 
building - shed) on Lot 10, Block 1, Section 17, Princess 
Anne Plaza, 737 Forest Trail. Princess Anne B(M-ough. 



8. Thomas D. Tiiite requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a street 
(Bayberry Street) cm Lot 130, Plat No. 1, Cape Story by 
the Sea, 2625 Poinciana Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

9. Charles and Helen Howard request a variance of 12 
feet to an 18 foot front yard setback (Presidential 
Boulevard) instead of 30 feet as required (swimming 
pod) on Lot 7, Block E, Windsor Oaks, 3621 Stepping 
Stone Lane. Kempsville Borough. 

10. Kingd(»n Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses by Janus T. 
Hinkle, Trustee, requests a variance of 2.07 acres of 
land area to .93 acres of land instead of 3 acres of land 
area as required f(»- a church on Lots 1, 2, 3, 14 & 15, 
Block 5, Booker WashingtCHi Park, 228 Pritchard Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

1 1 . Harry J. Tennien requests a variance of 6 feet to a 9 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Jeanne Street) 
instead of 15 feet as required (steps and deck) and <^6 
feet in fence height to a 10 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a 
street (Jeanne Street) cm Lot 1, Block 40, Section R, 
Pembroke Manor, 400 Betsy Ross Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

12. Lecxia S. Reynolds requests a variance of 2.5 feet to 
a 5.5 foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 8 feet 
as required (stoop and steps) on Lot 18, Block 4, Sectirai 
E,,Cape Henry, 221 and 223 72nd Street. Lynnhaven 
Bcvough. 

13. Tonmy Gibbs requests a variance of 9 feet to a 1 
fo(A rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(accessory building - storage shed) oa Lot 383, Section 
5, Lago Mar, 1005 (Canada Court. Princess Anne 
Borough. ^^ 

14. E. A. Smith requests a variance of 20 feet to a "O" 
rear yard setback (south prqserty line) instead of 20 
feet as required (boathouse - room addition) on Lot 109, 
Qub Section, Birdneck Point, 1329 Chewink Court. 
Lynnhaven Borough. ^^,^ 

15. Daniel E. and Evelyn S. Ccmnell request a variance 
of 10 feet to a 5 foot side yard setback (west side) and of 
5 feet to a 10 foot rear yard setback (north side) instead 
of 15 feet each as required (swimming pool) on Lot 10, 
Section 2, Part 1, BaycUff, 1337 Baycliff Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. Sue B. Myers requests a variance of 7 feet in 
building height to 42 feet instead of 35 feet in building 
height as allowed (third floor additic»i) oa Lots 3 and 4, 
Block 3, New Virginia Beach Cwporaticm, 6006 
Oceanfrcmt Avenue. Lynnhaven Bwough. 



17, Troy Wallace requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pod) on Lot 64, Block B, Section 2, 
Cedar Hill, 5716 Aspen Drive. Kempsville Borough. 



157-12 2T 8/25 VB 



W. L Towers 
Secretary 



Nusbaum Began At Turn Of Century 



Established shortly af- 
ter the turn of the century, 
S. L Nusbaum & Compa- 
ny has risen to a position 
of prcnninence in the field 
of a real estate investm- 
ent, development and 
management in Virginia 
Beach and the Tidewater 
area. 

Capabilities enccxnpass 
all facets of real estate 
service, from investment 
decisicxis of major import- 
ance to analysis of the 
most minute details. 



S. L Nusbaum &, Com- 
pany boasts a talentejd 
team of professionals 
whose individual areas of 
expertise contribute to the 
concept of a "total capabi- 
lity package" for real 
estate enterprise. 

The firm has developed 
shopping centers throug- 
hout the eastern United 
States. It has designed, 
built and managed shop- 
ping centers ranging in 
size from 75,000 to 
500,000 square feet. 



Hilltop North Shc^ping 
jCenter and Great Neck 
"Village Shc^ping Center 
are exampl(^s of the kind 
of development and prop- 
erty management services 
offered by the company. 

S. L. Nusbaum &. Com- 
pany is also very active in 
office building develop- 
ment, apartment develo- 
pment, office building 
management and a speci- 
alized accounting and re- 
porting system f(»- all 



prqjerty management cli- 
ents. 



The company also has a 
subsidiary insurance ag- 
ency which writes a full 
range of pdicies and bo- 
nds for property owners. 
Coverage includes public 
liability, autcxnobile liabil- 
ity, workmen's compensa- 
ti(Mi, and multi-peril insu- 
rance, as well as fire and 
marine insurance and fid- 
elity bonds. 



Bayside Hospital, The Pace Maker 



"A 'pace maker" ^ 
. soneone who sets tlM 
'. speed or spirit. As a pace 
maker, Bayside Hospital 
first opened its services to 
the community in Janua- 
ry, 1975 in response to a 
growing and changing 
population. If you exam- 
ine the past seven am! a 
half years since Bayslde's 
opening, there have been 
several additions to medi- 
cal servk^t ami hosiMtals 
in the Tidewater vea. 
With Bayside "setting the 
pace," Virginia Beach 
and ail of TIdewMer now 
enjoy very ^xn^te, mI- 
vanced and convenient 
health tare services. 



In the nwdical field, the 
term "pacemaker" appl- 
MS to an instrumeitt that 
serves the heart with re- 
gularity. Located at 800 
Independence Blvd. in 
^%ginia Beach, Bajnicte 
Hospital is in the heart <^ 
the lUewater area. Bay- 
tide makes every effort to 
serve the community with 
compkte health services. 
^ mksMB is to acMe^ 
ami maintain, through a 
system (tf hospital n^na- 
gement. an unequated te- 
vel ot nMaswiMe qutfty 
uid proiwetivky, in the 
(telivery at bos^tal servi- 
ees which are tttpomhe 
to tte vtinu «m1 ^(to of 



I»tients and their physic- 
ians. 

Besides rooms for med- 
ical and surgical patients, 
Bayside also has intens- 
ive, coronary aj^ i^ogies- 
sive care units, pediatrics, 
orthopedics, and an eme- 
rgency room which triages 
(evaluates) patients with- 
in 60 secoids d arrival. 
Other technical services 
^^e <ardio-pulmonary, 
taboratory, physical ther- 
apy, n^okcy, ultrasound 
and nuclear medicine, as 
well as tegular community 
beahh eduauioD prosra- 
nu to pron^ mttwtksm 
OB how to stay heahhy. 

te^Ue H conmitted to 



serving the Virginia Be- 
ach communtiy as it cha- 
nges and grows; to be part 
of its pa<». Ihatnxnntft- 
ment also means that ^idi 
individual iwtient that in- 
ters the hospital will be 
treated promptly, efficien- 
tly and courteously. Be- 
ing a patwnt and dealfag 
with an iUiKss or injuy 
can be a ^ry stressftil 
tone for an it^MdofA. 

Bayside is here to sehw 
the community so that ttk 
experiemx is one ^^ 
teaves a pttknt with ttc 
knowtedge that they te« 
been served 1^ expeifeiN 
oed, <w^^ ^trfessioai^ 



Index Of Classifieds 




31. luslmsi E^aipaimt 


»• r^TvVHBn 


32. lusimss Far R««t 


S-LMttFtUNtf 


33. Apsrtmtntt Far Rant 


4.A«tN 


S^ M9#fltS r W nVRft 


S. Tracks 


35. Nausts Far Ra«t 


•.Vam 


3S. Raal Estata 


7. HMttrcyclw 


37UtsFarSaia 


•.iMta 


31 M^ila Maaias 


t. Camper* 


3t. Prafassianai Sanrlcas 


ie.lMpWMt«4 


40. Sarvkas 


U.NtMMNWmtarf 


41. Carpantry 


l£ iMhMH Oppwtmity 


42.CMIiiCart 


13.Nt« 


43. Cancrtta/Masaiiry 


14.UvMlMk 


44. Elactricai 


• ^« W^^H^^W*W» 


45. ExtanRiaatiiic 


lt.ArticlMF*rSal« 


4€. rlraplacas 


17. FoniitNrt 


^/ . Hwina ffi^yrvvamani 


11. tatl^aM 


4«. InstracMan/EtfMcalian 


U.meyOn 


49. Mavhii A NaaHng 


20« MssictI InstfunMiin 


SO. Music Lassam 


21. TaltvWMi/StarM 


51 Painting 


> 22.Jtwtliy 


52. Hwtacrapliy 




53. Plana Ttming/Rapair 


a4.W«ita«T«lay 


54. Rafrigaratian 


2S.8M4TMiiptoEat 


K. Ramadallng/Dacarating 


2S. IlltMtaillMMt 


Sfi. Sawing AAltaratians 


27. 8araga/Yar4 Sales 


57.SalarEnargy 



4./MrtM 



r 



•••MtS 



2f . Lawn A fiardan 
30. Farm Equipmanl 



SS. Tai Sarvlea 

59. Enargy Cansarvatian 

M. MIscaNanaaM 



1. 



4.AiiiM 



LIFE AFTER LIFE- 

Introductory program. August 
21, 1982. at the Virginia Beacii 
Pavilion at iO:30 a.m. Spon- 
sored as a Public Service by 
ECKANKAR. CaU 480-0661. 
1-2T-8-1 8 

CUPID STUPID7-Ut us And 

your mate or date. Sent '2 for 
information to P.O. Box 9323, 
Norfollc. VA 23503. 
1-4T-8-1 8 



2. Parsonals 



WANTED - 28 overweight 
persons for proven, rapid, safe, 
inexpensive weight loss 
prjpgram. For appointment call 
877-3557 Newport News. 
^ 2-4T-9/ 8 

CREDIT PROBLEMS?- 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa 
with no credit check. Ouaran- 
teed. For free brochure, call 
House of Credit, TOLL FREE 
1-800-442-1531 anytime. 
2-4T-8-1 8 

CREDIT PROBUEMSr Receive a 
Mastercard or Visa with no 
credit check. Guaranteed. For 
free brochure, call House of 
Credit; TOLL FREE 1-800-442- 
1531 anytime. 
24T8-18 

WANTQh UNUSUAL Ideas 
on any subject for publication in 
book form. Share appor- 
timutely in royalties received 
over an extended period of time. 
No investment necessary. 
C.O.I., P.O. Box ^054, 
Chesapeake. Va. 23324. 

2-10T-9/15 



4. Autos 



VOLVO - 1973, 164E, 6 cylin- 
der, 80,000 miles, air, am/fm 
stereo, 4 door. Dark blue with 
leather interior. Very good 
condition. $2,500. Call 423- 
1101. 

4-lT.8/lg 

TRIUMPH - 1976, TR-7. 
am/fm stereo, air, lugg^e 
rack, must sell. Call 499-6279. 
4-1T-8/18 



VOLKSWAGON-1965, beauti- 
ful, 34 miles to the gallon. 
•950. CaU 483-3621. 
4^T-8-2 5 

PONTIAC-1974, Orandville, 
new tires, new exhaust system, 
new battery, new water pump 
and new ignition system. Very 
good condition. '700. Call 
547-1673 any time. 
4-4T-825 

VOLKSWAGON-1978, Con- 
vertable, air, am/fm stereo, ex- 
cellent condition, only 40,000 
miles. '7,000. Call 421-9725. 
4.4T-8-2 5 

CADILLAC-1973 Fleetwood 
Broughall, 4 door, tilt wheel, 
sjpiit bench seats with 6 way 
power, am/fm 8 track stereo, 
electric antenna, plus much 
more. '1.295. CaU 545-7880 
for more information anytime. 
4:4T-g-2 5 

DATSUN - 1973, 240Z. 4 

speed, AM/FM radio. Fair 
condition. Call 623-1191 
before 12 noon and any time 
weekends. 

4-4T-8/2 5 

THUNDERBIKD — 1976, 
white on white, loaded, good 
condition. $2500. Call 425- 
7675. 
4-4T-8/25 

MGB-1967. Oassic. conver- 
Uble, spoke wheels like new, 
back speakers, new seats, ex- 
cellent condition. Call Debbie 
466-7278. 

4-4T-8-lg 

GALAXY FORD-1968, Good 
Condition. •700 cash. Call 
467-5081. 
4-4T-8-18 

DODGE-1981, Colt Deluxe, 
am/fm stereo. 4-speed twin 
stick, reclining seats, plus 
more. '4500 negotiable. CaU 
428-M74. 
4-4T-9- 1 

CHEVETllE - 1981, 2 door, 
automatic, air. recent inspec- 
tion, excdient tires. 21,000 
n^es. $4,800. CaU 484-0270 
before 3. 

4-1T-8/18 



DATSON - 1974. 710 Station 
mifoa, 4 cylincter. 4 speed, 
am/fm racUo, good tires, $1250 
in god condition. CaU 545- 
3099 

MLSli 

VOLKSWAGON - 1976, Rab- 
bit. Automatic, am/fm, good 
tires, air, runs good $1250. 
CaU 545-3099. 

MLS3 

JEEP-Oovernment Surplus 
listed for '3.196. Sold for 
'44.00 tot information caU 1- 
312-931-1961 ext. 1447. 

. ♦-4T-9- 1 

MAZDA-OLC, 1978, 5 door, 
automatic, AM/FM, air, ex- 
ceUent condition. '2795. CaU 
857-4981. 
4-4T-9- 1 

OLD8MOBILE-1977, Toro- 
nado Brougham exceUent con- 
dition. All power, am-fm, 8- 
track stereo. CaU 855-7768. 
• 44T-8-1 8 

MERCEDES - 1964. 190D- 
DiesaJ. mechanicaUy very good 
condition. Body and back seat 
needs minor repair. $1,800 
cash. CaU 397-5690. 

4-4T-9/ 8 

FORD - Fiesta Ohia, 1978, air, 
am/fm stereo cassette, ex- 
ceUent condition. CaU anytime 
855-8166. 
4-lT-g/>« 

BUICK-1973, R^, 2 door, 
new muffler, tail pipe and tim- 
ng chain. '1000 negotiable. 
CaU 490-2152. 
4-4T-8-2 5 

1971 OLDS ENGINE - 350 cubic 
inch. ExceUent condition. '250. 

547-7645. 

4TFN 



S.TrHclit 



FORD - Custom pick-up. 
1979. F-150. Overdrive, power 
steering, power brakes, 351 
engine. Newly tuned and in- 
spected. CaU 487-9733. 
hXHOi 

FORD-1966 pick-up 

EconoUne. new tirea, air con- 
ditioning, very dependable. 
'350. CaU 547-1673 anytime. 
5-4T-8-25 



T.Mitinsifclit. 



79 HONDA GL lOIO-Black 
witii gold trim. Complete tour 
kit. AM/FM stereo radio ft 
cassette tacpe i^ycr. Cruise 
control garage kqpt. 11,500 
miles '3,500. CaU 547-8413. af- 
ter 5 p.m. 
7-TFN 

YAMAHA-1979, 750 spedal, 
red tear drop tank, low 
mileage. '1400. CaU anytime 
425-5528. 

7-4T-8-18 



SAIL BOAT - Coronado, 25 
foot. 2 sails. 7.5 ^ercury dec- 
trie start outboard. fiiU gaUey. 
sleqM 5, roUer rdsGog boom, 
an all US Cout Guard required 
equipment, many extras. 
$9500. CaU 488-4204. 
8-4T-8/25 

RAJA - 14Vi foot, 150 hp Mer- 
cury, power trim and tUt, 
talvadzed trailer, lots of ex- 
tras. $3,000 or best ofler. CaU 
467-0267. 

8-4T-9/8 



GLADSTONE-16 foot, with 
Johnsons 100 horse power 
motor. '850. CaU 482-1236. 
8-4T-8-25 

BOAT - 15V^ foot fiberglass! 
35 hp evinnide motor with 
trailer. All for $1,500, 
negotiable. Call 463-4550. 
84T-9/ 8 

LAR80N-18 foot, V-6 engine, 
OMC, I/O, Cox tih ti-ailer. 
skiing or fishing, has new star- 
ter, alternator, voltage 
regulator, carborator, ignition 
switch, stem drive, and water 
pump completely rebuilt. 
•2300 or best offer. Call 485- 
1031. 

8-4T-9-1 



S.Gampor* 



APACHE MASA - All 

fiberglass pop up. Excellent 
condition. Forced air furnace, 
gas, electric, running water, 
sleeps 6, insulated, electric 
brakes. MustseU. $1,600. Ex- 
tra wUI be thrown in. CaU 623- 
5827. 

9-4T-8/25 



10.IMpWai|M 



SALES REPRESENTATIVE- 

Commission. ideal part time 
situation. Regional distributor 
of SateUite TV Antennaes, 
need ambitious local represen- 
tative to market this entertain- 
ment system. CaU 1-804-788- 
8193. 
IMLfiilS 

INSURANCE AGENTS- 

Licensed AgenU, Life, Health, 
Accidents, up-front annualized 
commissions, weekly payday, 
no debit, unlimited territory; 
Large companies expanding in 
this area need 2 agents. 
Multiple products, annuities, 
and IRA's. If you are not ear- 
ning •600 plus per week and 
you are wiUing to work, send 
resume to: Insurance In- 
vestors. 821 R. Sunnyside 
Drive. Vuginia Beach. VA 
23464. 
lOlT-8- 4 

HELP WANl*..., - CaJhp 
ground hdp wanted. Spring and 
summer appUcations now being 
accepted for our registration 
desk, stores, swimming pools, 
maintenance, outside grounds 
and recreational fadUties. Apply 
between 10 am. and 2 pm. Mon- 
day thru Thursday, Holday 
Travel Park, 1075 General Bootii 
Blvd., Virginia Beach, or caU 
42$-0249. 
1017T8-25 





CASHM 
ON THE 



31^ 



An ad in the Sun/Post 
Ctassifi^s is like money 
in your pocket! Thousan- 
ds of homes in the metro 
area use the Sun/Post 
dassifiols to bring buyers 
and sdlers tc^ether...and 
you'll have moroy to show 
for it! Advertisii^ is the 
surest way to fmd a buyer 
for your honM, car or fur- 
niture... there's always 
someone who wants 
YOUR unwanted items, 
nione in your mi today! 




^ 



Classified Ads 



tampWirtii 



l3.Hte 



3 



Ub 



S7. 



2t.tMniftfiw4M 



HOT WANTIIHD^my in- 



im^ 



Midc fl(t f«aMk, itudcBU 
mlnmu Cd after I p.m. 
6^ «7-«Itt or 4M-10S1 . 

WANna» ^ MirketiBf 
npfwaMhc total iiDaae. A 
f^lftimla &«ct to ""— ^ff 

fUmU ■ml In adf (turt«n, 
•dlinaod ttiinrd* above 
iig^r wliliiiiiiniili wtt a 
poilttwMttx^ Forappofai- 

PA/a ma - act ii 

AWBUY - OubUBai cash. 
No Jwnt H Miit, no ddiwy, 
no m kow. Car aiMi pbone 
■aoHBjr. Can Pnm iUidc. 
4t7-ttlS brtwwa 2 and « pm 



mii-iomf 



OKMBLY MAN - wSk 

for Ban« taa opcrieaee private 
(tarty, (^ ora^^ «a Hve is 
or out. CillS4S-190«. 

IhSLSCi 

SECIBTABIAL WOttE • 
Mature. wcO q^lfied la^ 
withi 



elpnbyi 
alov^petakone. Wearea 
Boa-pn^ offHrisMioa, bat 
«e «« tfrtsr Mfce doHOiott. 
WcareiaaeBdofPoMrParaB- 
tafbronrpcli. Pleaaecd497- 
TtaO, «l-6654 or 19»432l if 
Jim caa help. 



An aHaNii(Haa»4.ooQ 

WW* to 22jm mvt. Ai 

racomfitiwiwl MSS to •233. 
CaM«qrttaM4»-2CS. 

I5-*r-»-l 



Catt Ms. 
tfevBMUi for more iafor- 
»7-081l. 



pait-thoe ea^fiarntat. Anu 
of paitkutar fattoeit - STOCS 
BROKERAGE. LAW. 
MQDiCAL. REAL ESTATE. 
INSURANCE and MOTBL 
CffFICSS - Beadi area only 
I%one4ff7-9661. 
. II-<T-9/ l 

HELPII-9 year old needs 
someone noe wno does not 
hoOer to take caie <rf ase at my 
house when mom and dad fo to 
woA. Hours vary fhai 6 am. 
to I ajn. and 3 p.m. to 3 pjn. , 
CsU4a6-S311 after 10:30 ajn. 
l(MT-9-l 



CASPrr-ir x 


21% 


light 


peen. tUdc dKXt 


dMf. 


•aoo. 


QA4«7-9704. 








i5-«r-*-i 



WANTED - Grain 
Operttor/mechanic. Pay 
smM to experience and 
whiiiHl^^ On mid off job oon- 
tiMNd adacatim ret^rad. 
Oril Ram Da^, Davis Grain 
OHpontian. 343-2041 w 4«1- 
OW 

iHT-y/8 

tAUB mSCm - Needed to 
ha^ market and distribute 
pradnels. CaB after 3 at 493- 
6111 Mk for Pete, or caU Mark 
«t 497-6118. Thank You. 

IML2/8 

6 LADDCS NIEDED - for sues' 
wMk. Car neoesswy, flenlike 
houta. Ideal for young mothers. 
Ban mneBRBt profits. CaO 499- 

6734. 

lOTTO 



11. 



iM t 



CABETiUaRr P ro fe ssi o B al 
cbqde. Any mca. OaD 1-104- 

232-7341. 

11.4T-S-1I 



13-TFN 

WIRED HAIRED 
DACHSHUND — Needs 
one. Very met md 
Idas. IfoasebrtAea. 
No cUttca. pets alai« weD 
with other anim^. Call 
miyttee 464-3694 or «l-«634. 
ANIMAL ASSISTANCE 
LEAGUE. 
lHT-?/« 

■EAIHJ: PUPS-Pure Mood 
pope. 7 weeks nU, no AKC. 
Good for hunttrs or peto. 
Pemaks 'SO. malm •60. Call 
S47-22S3 or 347-2933 afte 3 
pjs. 

13-4T-«-18 



WASHING MACHINE 

WoMag coadttkm. tfeeito 
^nor icp^. %a. OsE 

USrUBW404 MOM. 



LIVING ROOM 8UITE-4 

piece hercohm set. H23. CeU 

423-7923. 

17-4T.6-lg 

CfWCH AND CHAOUkeea 

pWd. ev^ Amsican, A-1 
camiUaa.*200. StereondTV 
Stand, MO. CU 343-170. 

17-4T-9-I 



It. 



JOYNER, PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and town ser- 
vice. Free cttinHttcs. 30-4949. 
»TPN 

MULCH-nrrLER and SON 

Shicdded wood and bark hv- 
dwood, tnickload. any size. 
Protect your riuubs. Get now 
wUe oo sak. We dcEvs in one 
ifaV. I33^» or 833-7467. 

29TFN 



BOOKKEEPING-Monthly 
balaa» sheet. P dt L. < 
triri Wooe irom yi 
aad noeipta. nba. or 
tapm. 94l's nd VA-S**. 14> 
to 200 checkbot* uan en rHrmr 
mtmtUy: '43. Payables, 
receiv^k. small payroU. 
Chesigeake o^. Orii 420- 

66». 

I^TPN 



It. 



HAND CHAITfit - Gob 

florsale. MaatselL 7 



460-3733. 



for pJBHris. C^ 
16.1T.8/18 



REPRIGBSATOR-S230. 

XLIOO motorcyde. •273. CaB 
460«793. 

I6-4T-94 



IS. 



17. 



12. 



2w« TO 399« pawmi- 

Whoksak or retml over 2S0O 
itenu. Dealers urgently 
needed. Ftcedetaik. iR^iic: 
Soitfhside Distribnton. P.O. 
Box 1076. RanUn VA 23S31- 
1076. 

32>2T-S-1S 



FRAPr 
THE FEVlX X^ y 

REPAK 

F^mttuie'Cais 

• Boats • Restaurants 

Rnideittial A Oomfflerdal 

ALSO 

B^e^lpbi^ay • Aiv Material 

DiHWS* Sp reads > Qgpetii« 

ffBEE ESTIMATES 

468-5227 



13. Ms 



HBHTANY SPANBL • Ex- 
cellent faintfng stock. 7 
,3Mdcs. WanHd.lst 
SIOO. »3-3St3. 

134T-9/S 



Remodjeling Replace- 
ment Windows. Any 
Type of luipiovcmcqts. 
FkceEiteitfH. 
R. H. BLACK 
399.9499 m-nn 



Wten Somctiiii^ Ncdb 
BaiMlBg or Rtptired, Ybu Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 

specialist 

> BiddN Contrndor • Rooft • GMpoftt • Osragei 

• Mth Rcmodded • Roan Addhimu 

• Ahiminiun Sdtaip • l^clMi R«n*o<^^ 

545-7318 




very 

food ooadilifln. '123. Diycr, 
Kenaaore. very good c on dition. 

•123. 

13-CT'-S-23 

WASHING MAOBDNE^feed 

timer. *30. QAnqpthne. 464- 
3694. 

13-4T-9- 1 

' ■ 

UnncaatATCm-l side by 
side •195. 1 two door *18S. 2 
* conditioners. SiOOO BTU, 
•130 and 18.000. '183. Ken- 
more wnaher •S3. Amana 
Vnatrna. CaUSS8-10S4. 
13-4T-8-23 

TEST 4 POCT-Sheraton Styfc 
Queen size bed. solid 
mahogany, hand carved by 
master fonuture nmkcrs. One 
of a kind. '3300. Many other 
items inducbig amitpies and 
Persian tfurway runner. Call 
833-0171. 
16-2T-8-I8 

■ED^Sears. electric adjnsta- 
dex. eKcDem comMtioB. *S». 
' Adding ■■»*^*""* , Olivetti Un- 
derwood, food ccmdMoB, '33. 
Adinstabk bed rails. •». Oa 

6274310 after aj!.n.: 

riMT-8-23 



FWIITUSE 

tabks ud orffee trides. boy 
bmk beds, mntue s s e s . chest of 
ibawers. green wmcr bottk 
lamps vriHi Andes, stereo 
cabinet a^A meakers, bio^n 
rediner. e ne c t ive desk and 
chairs. Moving most scO. Gall 
493-1110. 

17-1T-8/18 

rURrarURMIoakcaae, mtt- 
offioe chairs, 
r.cbietteset. 
Old taMea^ marhk top eoffiee 
tabk. smaB dmk. beds. smaB 

deaner. LafiQctta Stares mca. 
Can 623-0693. 

17-4T-9-1 



ANTKKS PIANO - Mist sel. 
sniffy carved square giand 
Patrntwd dme. liC Ex- 
eondition. •3.000. Call 
4f7-04«. 
_^ 18 4T 8-18 

ANTIQUE FURNITURE - 

Bwly 20th century, dining 
Breakfront, ser- 
Mahngany in 
^ ^PliyfedesMpn. $1300. 
Ciai40-3I39. Afler6p.m. 
^ 1S4T.9/8 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike. Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
necklaces: Vases and Boms. 1804 
grani>y ».. 625-91 19. Daily 10-3. 
18TWI 



31. 



RESXAiUIANT EQUIP- 

M»IT-0kw-Reoon£tiooed) 
supplies and parts. "We ser- 
vice what we kU." DIxk 
E<|ulpm«Bt Company. 316 
West 21st Street. Norfolk 
Vniiipa 23317. C3-7073. 

31-0^-8-18 



TYPING SmVICB - Vm 

businesses and iwlividnab. 7 
days a week. IBM Sekctric. 
Reasooabk nta. CaD either 
467-7112. KempsvUk area, or 
463-0236. Hilltop/Pembroke ar- 
ea. 

40TFN 



32. 



Faritart 



It. 



HUFFY 15 SPEED-a) Ukes. 
mens light Muc, 26-inch, one 
feu oM, very good condition. 
^. One in cxodient condition 
•70. Can 481-0749. 

19-4T-8-18 



21. 



OUTSTANDING OPPOR- 
TUNITY-In solar heating 
business. High profit. 
Minimum investment '14.000. 
CaU«^7792. 

' 32-4T-8-25 

LOUNGE FC» SAI£-'23.000 
and assume, serious inquiries 
only. caU 427^6621. 
32-4T-8-23 

STORES AND STORAGE 
AREAS - AU szes. Properties 
unlimited. Marvin Goldfarb. 
399^390.484-1275. 

32TFN 



■ wmdobotdcs 
in n^ home. Eq >erie n ceai in 
payrool and quaittrly returns. 
Pick-up md dupery service. 
Can 343-4096 after 3 pjn. Tor 
■ more information and rata. 

40TFt4 



41. 



CARPENTRY. PAINTING. 
ROOTING - and aU typa ol 
iiBaiHt>M<if> Storm windows, 
gutters and screens rqiaired. 
Free estimates. Samkrs Con- 
struction. «04433. 

41TFN 



smie 3 pkoe. tr^ dresser with 
mirrw, donbk Aeaer, bed 
with hendboard. 2 n i ^t H a n d s . 
•690 or best <^er. CaU 464- 
2330 after 3:30. 
17-4T-9- 1 

3 PIECE aOUD lEAVWOOS' 

Stereo Cabinet - 83" long. hNs OS 
storage space for tapes and 
lecords. Has Sony reel-to-red 
tape deck and Sony reodvcr 
SR6030, 30 wattt per channd. 2 
Smisai qwafcers, SP2000. i^iaoe 
fai odnnet for turntable. AS for 
•g0»s<3an«8»-5814f- '" 

17TPN- 



VM)LIN-Mnde in Germany, 
nud 1800's, soft tone, perfect 
for intimate aettmg or student 
home use. MOO. CaU 499- 
1842 after 6 pan. 

20-4T-9-1 



33./lpartnMrtsFM-iMrt 



3 



cz 



HIFI SYSTEM - Sansui 
tuner/anqi. Elac record pkyer, 
2. KUK speakers m hard 
wood cabinette Grudig 4 track 
red tape, recofder and player. 
Not new birt good quaUty. 
$373 necotinbk. CaU 467- 
14773. 
21-1T-8/18 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, (»e and 2 bedroom 
apartmentt. Fran *260. Rental 
office, 482-3373. evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



GREEN RUN • ADULT 
LIVING near Oceana ft Dam 
Neck. 1,2 ft 3 bedroom aptt.. 
also townhouses with private 
patios, swimming pool and ten- 
nis -ctmrts. 9iort term lease 
availaUe. Heat and hot water in- 
duded. Rents start at '320. The 
Pines. 468-2000. / 

33TFN 



42.CMMCW* 



ATTENTIONII 

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 
FULLTIME H^LOYMENT. CALL 547-21Tr, 

Bfr. Hcpkr BETWEEN 8 &9 AM. 



TtiRy I 



34.ltoMHFM-R«rt 




Sding, renting (V liiriiV? 
Sim/Poft dasdfiedg are die angwer 

Plwx yon l<»w cott. qukk acdng datgified ad 
today. CaD 486-3430 or mafl the handy coupon. 
We're here to he^ you with yoiff ad. 

20 words or leu. 1 wedt, only H.(»A weelu, 
onto •12.00 fThe fourth weelcii free). Yomradwifl 
ma hi each ii8ue of the Virginia Beach am and 
CtaapeakePoit. 



MydaiMedAd 



NOW OPEN! 

Tidewater Trading Center 
1435 Batebii^ Blvd. 

Chesapeake, ViriMa 

Auctions, Sbying. SdUng, Promotiong. 
Antiques Wanted. OMiagnments Accqtfed. 
Itow Roitii^ Sh(^ Spwx. 
AactloM Every WcdMsday Evcniii at 7:30 P.M. 

Days S43-21tt 397-4548 NIgils 42»-2l&S 



CASH f An> - Virginia Bench 
Antiqae Co. pays cadi for an- 
fiqaa. <M furniture, clocks, 
^assware. temps, china, oil pain- 
ifa^, oricmnl rugs, crtd iron and 
and^ne tar%. We tmy one piece 
or entire housefuOs. Also, good 
used fiinnture. CaU 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



W)OM MATE NEEDED - 
Ftmak to share with female, 
mature, reqionsibie. individual 
to share my townhoiise. Prefer 
a non-smoker and enjoy 
animals. S18S plus half 
utfltties. Available September 
1st. CaU 490-2653 after S:30 



CHILD CARE-My home. 
Tidewater and CtamweO Road. 
Fenced yard, toddlers 
preferred. 2 playrooms, 
nntritioiis meals and snncks 
provided. CaU85S.«820. 

42-4T-9- 1 

CHIU) CARE-Charicstown- 
Kempsville area. Mature 
dependable person, csqierien- 
ced. 1 win take care of your 
duhfaen, aU aces in nqr home. 
Meal and snacks provided, 
playroom, fenced yard. 
Anytime. Weekly rale. *33. 2 
cluldren*SO. '1 hourly rme for 
ib<qH>if-^<3all 495-1684. 

- --' 4^47>9.l 

CHILDCARE - mytime, In- 
dian River Road area. 2 
itqwnsiUeadytts. Reasonable 
rates. CaU anytime 420-4923. 

4^4T-»/8 

CHILDCARE - My home, 
anytime. wiU serve snacks and 
lunches. fenced yard, 
RemonaWe rata 



pm. 



344T-9/8 



340-2223. 



42-1T-8/18 



at. 



36. Raal Estate 



D 



POR SALE-70 Baflroom dance 
CaU Larry Duhn for 
information 480-21S4. 

26-TFN 



I Me 



!rattadfor()lweek,()4weda(«() 
I in«fl8tt)pped. Coitk*ll00f<}r4wedctforfii« 
I wcfdg. 20* for each a ddl Hrtnal word. 



South Drive-In Theatre 

Flea Market 

2501 CamposteDa Road 
Chesapeake, Va. 

Venders FREE 



7:30 a.m. to di^ 
CoMcsrioa staad 4: deal re^rooas 




HOU^ FOR SALE - Virginia 
Bewrfa, 7 blocks from ocean. 9 
loom home. 4 bedroom, sun 
room, aluminum siding. Dutch 
Colonial. Only SI 5.000 down 
and assume 1st and 2nd non 
ESC loans. UHQ a moitth. 
Owner wiU rinance balance 
10%. Owner/agent Jerry. CaD 
34(M100ortt2-0253. 

36-4T-9/8 



CHILDCARE - My home. 
Any age. wiU serve macks and 
meab. Reasooririe rates. CaU 
497-8197. 

42-1T.8/18 

CHILDCARE - My home. 
Monday dun I^riday. Prtfer 
toddkrs. Reasonable rttm. 
Can423«946. 

4MT-S/18 



47. 



r 



3 



Ctf S«4(U 4V 4Z»aQi» »6 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes A Custom 

Buil^krs 

SALES OFFICE 
333ProvidfiiccRd. 

CALL 464-9317 



R(X»ING SERVICE 4nduding 
quarterly payroll reporta and 
bank account reconciliation, 
^jcdalizing in smaU propreitar- 
ships. Pick up and delivery. 
Retired professional. CaU 420- 

5624. 

39TFN 




ADDITIONS. ROOMS-. 

orpcMry. rooff^. skiing. 



platfwing. dactric, concrete 
wmk, {dueling, guttering. 



D 



cm. 

SUM 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 



P.O. Mi tM 

Va„ a^ 



We wmt you to dfecover high quality, name 
Inland f^^(»is at reasonable pric^!! To 
accomplish this m are ofteing you a voy 
special bonus not available to the 
^ia*al publk: 

Pre^ot thu c(nipon md mcdve a q^edal diKOunt of 
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12 Virginia Beach Sun, August l8. 1982 



K-9 Dog Abducted 



Crime 



Cdl 427-4)000 




By BMcb Uelectlve 




For this weeks "Crime of the week", 
Virginia Beach crime solvers is looking for the 
person who took one of the dogs being trained 
for police K-9 duty. As only dne out of 15 
dogs are able to qualify, this is a large loss for 
the police department. 

On July 16, 1982 at 1:10 P.M., Officer 
George Ball fed and watered police dog 
"Skippy" after a training session. Officer Ball 
then locked the dog into pen -11 at the animal 
control shelter located at 100 Leroy Drive. 
"Skippy" is a cream colored german shepherd 
with black and silver saddle markings. He 
stands 24 inches high and weighs 70 lbs. Also 
the tip of his right ear is missing. 

The caretaker on duty stated that at ap- 
proximately 3:30 P.M. on that same day a 
white male customer entered the animal con- 
trol building and asked to look for a dog. He 
then left the office and went into the area that 
the dogs are kept. The caretaker said that no 
one else entered that area after this man and he 
never returned. At 4:10 P.M. the caretaker 
discovered pen -11 had been unlocked and 
"Skippy" missing. The loss is estimated at 
$1,200. 

The suspect is a white male, 18-25 years old, 
5'-6" to 5'-8", thin build with stringy brown 
hair and a fu manchu style moustache. 




Suspect Wanted By Crime Solvers 

, ~ , ■ '^- 

K-9 dogs are valuable assets to our police 
department and crime solvers needs you to 
help in recovering 'Skippy" and apprehending 
his thief. 

If you have any information about this 
crime, call 427-0000 and you can receive up to 
a $1,000 cash reward. Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers also will pay cash rewards for the 
arrest of anyone who has committed a crime in 
Virginia Beach as well as for information 
about wanted persons, confiscation of drugs 
or stolen property. Your anonymity is guaran- 
teed at all times. 



Schizophrenia Group to Meet 



The Relatives and 
Friends Group of the 
Schizophrenia Foundation 
of Virginia will meet at 
7:30 p.m., on Tuesday, 



August 24, at Beach There will be news of For further infor- 

House, 2420 Virginia the Convention of the mation, call 499-2041 

Beach Blvd., to discuss National Alliance for the between 10 a.m. and 4 

coping with Mentally 111, recently held p.m. weekdays, 

schizophrenia. Arlington. , " '""*■* " 



ii 




Woods Looks Out From His Bayside Home 




Woods Wants To Be Fair 



ContiQued From Page 1 

specific reasons to change it . " 

Bayside Schod Board member Duncan Wallace 
sides with Henley in supporting the limited 
number of terms. 

"In general, I think anyone after a prdonged 
period of service, can still be of some benefit to 
the system," Wallace said, "but I don't think 
they should serve indefinitely. I think the system 
is better served with an influx of new ideas and 
new people." 

Although the schdarly spotlight is focused on 
Woods, there are other school board members 
affected by the city's ruling. 

Representing the Kempsville bo-ough, Reva 
Kelberg has served on the school board since 
1966. She is not eligible for reappointment and 
neither is Leland M. Hood, Pungo borough, who 
was first named to the board in 1970. Hie term of 
at-large board member Homer Cunningham also 
expires this December, but since he was first 
appointed to the bou'd in 1979, he is still eligible 
for two more three years terms, if Gty Council is 
so inclined. 

AccOTding to Wginia Beach Mayor Louis 
Jones, no decision has been made oi the question 
of schod board appdntments. Jones also feels 
Woods effective on the board. 

"Dr. Woods has been a very capable member 
and chairman of the sdiod board," Jones said. 
"I would have to look at the entire picture to see 
who is nominated, hcrt/ever, before I supported 
anyone. We haven't discussed it." 

Woo& Not Sclflsh 

In discussing his future on the schod board, 
Woods thinks not somudi (rf himself as he does c^ 
others. 

"If they make an exception for me, what about 
the others?" 1^ asks. 

He Uves qui^y in the Ba^de section of 
Virginia Beach with Us wife Lds. lltfy have coe 
son, Jdm, 42, a buyer for Ford in Detrdt. 

U Woods, e<fciaued at Iin»^ IMversity, 
Jefferson CSty, Mo., wd at Boston Univenity, 
Boetoi, Md., it rem>pointed or not, \m concern 
for the \^ginia Beach schod system does not 
waiver. 

"I hope tbe Virginia BeKh wAod system wiU 
omtiniK to unprove like it hat tr/ct the years," 
sud Woods, fsnm;r hetd <A the P^ka 
Dei^atnwat ti NorMk &ate University, Norfolk. 

He is a Httle ooncenwd tiSoai. Ae new tt«t 
which oaM ttow up on the td»d board tU 
winter, adii^, "I hope ttey wiO mA hamltoqy tte 
si^ri^Mtett." 

Bm^M iMte wUl oo^ttw to str^i tte 
•ctesi board, Wn^ tqn. 



The city needs to hire minority teachers, Woods 
also said. 

"I lil» to see us hire the best teachers 
possible," Woods said. "But no, I'm not happy 
with the number of minority teachers hired in 
Virginia Beach. There are very few blacks in the 
municipal government administraticm. Blacks do 
not have any vding power in Virginia Beach. 
Although John Perry had a fair showing when he 
ran far dty council. / 

"As the city schod system hires mace blacks, it 
will have a psychdogical effect on the whde 
p^mlation," Woods continued. "lUce relation- 
ships «)uld be improved." 

Another relationship affecting ttM sdiod 
system is that between parents, children, and 
teachers. 

"On the whde we have some pretty good kids 
in the schods," Woods commented, "although 
some of them don't have a very high regard for 
htmum life. 

"The family imit has broken down," he 
continued. "We have toget it back together. It's 
the stabilizing institution in any situation. 
Schods cannot solve all the social problems, ft's 
diluting what the schods are supposed to be 
ddng." 

Woods champions getting first graders started 
on heavy does of math and the computer sciences. 

"Kids in. the future wfil be far more luivancxd 
and knowledgable," Woods asserts. "Television 
has made a tremendcxis change. There's been an 
explosion in the advan<»ment of knowledge. 

"Every kid should know something about com- 
imters and not be conftised by the tomnology," 
Woods continued. "Th^ should be as famiUar 
with it as the English language. " 

Woods said he's hiwy with his Ufe thus fiu. 

"It helps anyone if he am see sane of their 
ideas manifest," he siud. "I'm satisfied with my 
life up to Uiis pdrrt. There were sane things I 
could have doie better. I grKluated magna cum 
laude, I should have been suma." 

Does he thing his work will live on after he 
dies? 

"They'll forget you," he siad. "As soon as 
you're dead you're forgatoo." 

Woo^ doesn't believe in corporal punishment. 

"Idon't like it really," Iw said. "It's inh«iMi» 
to UU or punish someone for misbehavia. O^r 
cHsciirfinary n^Mwet are sure efliet^ve: fo- 
examirie, oirtaiUng isiv^dges. to-tchod sus- 
pensions . bi (kn't tMiyi: it's wrong to iMve it on 
tlMNxia. For tomkU^ it is a behavior amdtfer. 

W90<b' ^^ eonoan is tte luk of iMit par- 
tMpattm <rf ^ local schooU. 

"'Aflt't Oie UM«t tiUi«," he said. "Parents 
ai^ dienr reh^wt^ to tte schodi umI tte 
students. We ami moA more {Ntfeat fMuMpat- 
tan. Mmg &mema^ pvemi are in the PTA, but 
iM Mml msu^ mem oonotnied vdontecn." 



iW 



''^'m^m^^''^^i^mmmmm^tl/gfmm^^' 



^mgs^^'^mtm 



vma^^^ym^m 



PP^PmPK^^* 




1 



Special Community Supplement 

The Virginia Beach Sun 

& Chesapeake Post 



Page 2 August 18, 1982 



Nightingale Saves Time And Lives 



Sirens are screaming as pdice and rescue squads 
race down Virginia Beach Expressway towards an 
accident scene. They socn arrive to find broken glass, 
crushed metal and an air of ccHifiision. 

A young man sits beside his car ~ head down and 
shocked by what happened so quickly just minutes 
before. Another older man yells for help. His teenage 
son is trapped inside the car and isn't responding to 
pleas. 

As police ccHitrd traffic, Virginia Beach Rescue 
Squad members assess the teen's situaticm. Besides 
being unconscious, a c(Mnp<Mind leg fracture and 
multiple head injuries are obvious upon first inspection. 

They know what to do. 

9:58 p.m. 

Miles away, beepers are buzzing. Mghtingale, the 
first hospital-lwsed air ambulance service in eastern 
Virginia and northeastern NcMth Carolina, is called into 
action. 
10:01 p.m. 

A specially trained flight nurse, a nationally 
registered Paramedic and a inlot are on board as the 
helicc^ter lifts off. 

Radio ccHitact is made, allowing N^tingale's crew 
to receive detailed patient information from the on-site 
crews. A controUing physician in a nearby emergency 
room monitors the situation and advises the airborne 
crew of aiq>ropriate action. 

10:09 p.m. 

As the teen is extracted from the crushed vehide, 
and as police secure and light the landing zone, 
Mghtingale descends. Upon touch down, the 
helicopter crew rushes to the side of the iiyured youth. 
Ihey help ground E.M.T.'s stabilize the victim before 
transport. 

10:10 p.m. 

I^ghtingak lifts away from the accident site - once 
again talking to the emergency room doctor. Tbe I.V. is 
continued and the patient is intubated. Ibe ^krfolk 
General Hospital trauma unit is alerted. 

10:29 p.m. 

The trauma team is rendering sc^histkated medical 
care. The youth will probably make it. 

Although most missicxis are from one hospital to 
ancxher, the preceding scenario is not unusual for 
Nightingale. On July 31, the new servii^ had already 
received 156 requests since its Febrtiary 25 commence- 
ment date. Almost twenty-five percent of all respoises 
have been to accident sites. This utilization rate is 
much higher than pre-operational projecticms. 

"We are very happy with the initial indication of 
Mghtingale's success. We believe this can be directly 
attributed to the sophistication of our region's E.M.S., 
medical and public service communities," said Ed 
Hdmes, the project's administrative coordinator and 
Administrates' of Leigh Memorial Hospital. 

Based at the Norfolk General Hospital helipad. 
Nightingale is on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 
During the last full month, the crew has averaged a 
resp<nise time (from request to lift-ofi) of under four 
minutes. The Bell LongRanger II aircraft cruises at 
speeds in excess of 130 miles per hour, transporting 
critically injured patients within a 125 mile radius of 
Norfolk. 




Niglitta«alecoiii^clMa«>tliCTC«HrtncyBrfMlM. Om 
of 167nciiaiiMloMtai1Uewatertotete. Tkedtfcfof 



Vfariliria Beaek «id Cktnpttkt bmnbtmrnrreA Mrty- 
Mvcn tiiBCi by this "Ni|httatrie of the aUcs" 



"Hie time the helicoiner has saved in getting raitical 
patients to an approiniate £Kility has beenremarlfii- 
Ue," Bob Smith, the Director of Norfdk's Emergency 
Communications Center pointed out. 

Even before becoming operational, hGghtingale 
received cooperation from more than 30 hospitals and 
numerous public service agencies. To date, 30 
hospitals and nearly as many rescue sqiuuls have 
actively participated in this life-saving project. 

The crew hiEU flown missions as far away as 
Washington, D.C., Richmond, the Eastern Shore and 
Emporia. Several other flights have involved crossing 
state Uncs into North Cardina, including a recent flight 
to Duke Medical Center. 

All medical equipment necessary for advanced life 
suppot are on-board hfightingale. Special features 
include: two litters, oocygen and vacuum systems, a 
defibrillator, a tippler, a ventilator, MAST trousers, 
UHF/VHF radios and pcmtoons for emergency water 
landings. 

"hfightii^ale has the potential to reduM the 
morbidity and mortality rates in this area," stated Don 
Haupt, Director of Norfolk's Paramedical Rescue 
Services. 

Althoigh local and regional medical, and public 
service personiwl have been pleased with hSghtingale 



peiformaneey CSiief Flight ,Nur^„ Q^y Hetfi^i^i 
beUeves lr««l get bsetter. "W#"htve learned » gi%af 
deal during our initial phase. With input from outside 
agencies, we have been aUe to£ne tune«nd streamline 

many of our operational and response procedures," she 
noted. 

This new dimension to emergency health care 
continues to stay active. Currently, the specially-train- 
ed crew members (there are 18 total crew members) are 
responding to an average of one call a day, making i| 
one ctf the most utilized new hospital-based systems in 
the country. 

Medical Center Hospitals, the non-profit iMsirital 
system whk;h sponsors hightingafe. projects $740,000 
will be spent for the new service during the fint year. 
Patients are charged $75 for lift-off and $S p«r $mutt 
mile for mage. Services are rendered regaidytest of 
ability to pay, however. 

Why is hfightingak needed? Holmes sod ttie raswer 
is simple. "We realize that for every 30 mimttes that 
elapses between the time ot a serious OMdical 
emergency and the time a patient receives definitive 
care, the mortality rate can be expected to tri|de," be 
explained. 

"If we can save time, we can save Mves and we know 
^Sghtingale saves time," he added. 



Health Center 
Opens At 
Green Run 




I « ..T yX 



Residents of Oeen Run and other areas of the city 
south of i^illand Road have a jkw alternative for 
outpatient care with the opening of the Green Run 
Medical Center at 3386 Hidland Rood. 

The center features many services you might expect 
to find in a hciipital, ^ttidi as stress testing ai^ 
electrocardic^rams. It has a lab, operated by Wgmia 
Beach General HixpiU^ ^d is equipped with' j£my, 
fluc»-osc<^>e and ultrasound equipment. It can supply 
as much outfmdemxati as ahost^tat cul. . 

Ckeen Run was selcaed as the site fw the new 
Eacthty because there are about 7i0,O06 resfalente mtkm 
a two-mile radius. The location will mean a 
cdasidei^bte saviflfs a travel time for residents ^wto 
normally would drive to Virginia Beach General for 
treatment. I ' •"-- .i tn 

The center has about 40 physicians, all either 
certified by their various specialty boards o^ eligible for 
board certification. It is operated by a central 

administrative staff. 

^flltrs1fthecp4>teja^7j^78^3l^.m. TJagio^Idt 
«i of8«vB it ranges from $184o SSO. 



s H 



mo^ 



Prescription: 

for a WKole^P&soh 



iijj 



SmileTlt's the melody of the soul 
Work: li^ the sirvioi t^ihe^tk 
Pksysit's tiKseer0t^^o»t^dm^ 
Read: It 's the source of wisdom , - 
Love: It's the gift of the heart 
Pray: It answers every need 

By Hezekiah Speiwe 



Augiiat 18, 1992 Pliigc 3 



€€ 



When My Feet Hurt, I Hurt All Over" 



Foot Ailments Should Not Be Neglected 



Courtesy of Alan R. Cook, P.P.M. and John P. 
D'Amelio,D.P.M. 

To many pec^te thdr feet are the most nqlec^d part 
of tlwir body. They we mi^reated, ovoworked, cram- 
med into shoes that look bttter tium they flt or fed and 
are fOTg<Mteauntfl they hurt. And as the (M saying foes 
"When my feet hurt, I hurt all ovar." 

It b no w<»der tlutt four out of five adults iHU even- 
tui^ suffer fttm foot i»t^>lcms of OM sort qrmcKlwr. 

Each foot c<mtains 26 Ixmmh ami tofetta th^ have 
one-foiffth of all the hemes in Uk human -iKNfy. lime 
boon are infrfcittdly ttikod by 33 'yams% arUi^ «r»hdd 
tofddher 1^ over 200 i^amcDts. Ov« 2Q modes h^ 
contrd the moveoMDt of the foot parts and hdp to 
mrice it an arcUtectural ma^erpkoe. 

Most of the foot pnMtemi sera in our offices are 
usually cMised by a structural defici^cy wlrfdi leads to 
hnprop«r foot fiuicti<» and patholc^. Heredity, im- 
propCT foot wear, (^euty, and systemic disease also 
help aggravate foot ptkAAoU. 

Let us look at some of the common foot ailments seen 
and treiUed by Podiatrists. 

Ingrown toenails are very common uid usually in- 
volve the big toe. In most cases it is caused by an ab- 
normal growth plate or nail root that may have been in- 
jured at omt time, resuMng in an abnoraial growth pat- 
tern. H^edity, abnormal cutting of nail»and improper 
ihoes can also be causative factors. Sdf care indiKies 
trimming nails strai^t ao'ou and avokling catting into 
the nail grooves. If the ingrown nails are (Mimful and do 
not respond to self care, you shoiUd see your Podiatrist, 



who can trim, protect or permanently remove the 
ingrown nail as necenary. 

Coma are thickenings of skin where repeated pressure 
and friction occur. Corns are found on or betwera the 
toes. Onus on top of the toes are usually produced by a 
muscle imbalance whkh causes the end jmnt of oat or 
two smaller toes to beml abnormally. The bent on 
hooked toe ttoi ndra apunst riioes and punful amis 
devdop. The soft conn found between the toes are 
usua^ caused by pressure from abnormal caldum areas 
we can qnin. Shoes squeeze the toes together to 
looducelhecom. 

A IHidiattrut's care of these ecmlitioitt involve 
rano^i^l the punful skin and protecting the area fr<Mn 
pressure and friction. Whoi the condition is very pain- 
ful and duronic, your Podiatrist can perform a minor 
procedure which invfdves removing the abnormal 
caldum areas for pomaiMnt rdief . lliis can be perfor- 
med on an outpatimt basis under local anesthesia. 

Plantar warts are benign growths found on the bot- 
tom of the feet. They are viral skin infections that have 
the ability to spread to other parts of the foot .or body if 
left unattended. They are most common among 
childroi, but can occur at any age. They should be 
treated as soon as possible to avoid spreading. When 
found on the bottom of the foot, care must be taken in 
removing warts in order to prevent painful scar for- 
mation. 

A Bunion is the movement of the great toe towards 
the second toe, with an unsightly bump at the base of 
the big toe. Tho^ are many causes for bunions which 
indude improper shoes, ho-edity and poor foot po^ure. 



No Cure For High Blood Pressure 



By David W.Be^M.D. 

High Uood pressure is an illness that is very commcm 
in the United States. One in every 4 or 5 persons in this 
country has btood pressure that is too hi|^ most of the 
time. 

Everyone's blood presnire goes up when they are 
angry, afraid, nervous <a ufMet. Fortunately their blood 
pr^ure goa back to nt^mal whoi they are in less 
stressful situatiims. Pecqrie with high blood pressure 
also have devations of thdr blood itressure under stress. 
Their blood pressure <k>es not return to nmmal when 
the stress is gone. 

Hie dii^osis of high blood pressure canned be don^ 
widi a nn^ blood pressure reading. Usually three 
separate detominations are needed. 0<xasionaUy a per- 
son's blood presKire is fouMl to be extrandy high on 
the first reauUng, prompting the stut of medication or 
even hospitaliziHion. 



People at greater risk of having high blood pressure 
are those whose parents (»- otho- family members have 
also had high blood pressure. These people may not 
have high blood pressure now but are more likdy to 
devdop it in the future. 

Can high blood preuure be avoided? The single most 
important step a po^on can take to avoid high blood 
pressure is to avoid the use of extra salt in their diet. 
R^ular exereise and maintaining a normal body weight 
are also important in avoiding high blood pressure, as 
wdl as controlling high blood pressure that has already 
been diagnosed. 

Can high blood pressure be cured? High blood 
pressure cannot be qured. It may be possible to control 
the blood pressure with smaller d<»es of medication or 
with salt restriction and wdght l(»s alone. These 
dedsions should be reached with yoiu* physicim. 



Many times this is a progressive problem and the skin 
over the bunion can become irritated and swoll^. 
Hiere are many vwys to correct this deformity. An 
analysis of your walking pattern, foot type and x-rays 
will hdp determine the cause and enable the Podiatrist 
to choose the best possible correction. 

Tlwre are many other conditions affecting the foot 
that we have not toudied on. Hopefully you have a bet- 
ter awaroiess of wlat the feet go through and what can 
happra to tlwm. Remembo' the foot, vHien taken care 
of, will make you fed betta and when you fed good 
you look good. So put your best foot forward and keq) 
onwdking. 

What's That Cramp 
In My Leg ? , 

By Robot A. Cecchino, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

As individuals get older they frequently become 
resigned to various aches and pains. They know their 
feet may be getting older and ascribe it to poor dr- 
culation. Leg pains may be due to a host of causes but 
there is one of specific concern. If a leg cramp or pain 
occurs uniformily after about the same degree of 
walking or exercising and then leaves after a short 
period of rest it is called intermittent claudication. In- 
crease in the speed of walking or in the effort as in clim- 
bing stairs will bring the pain on sooner. This is a 
definite sign of vascular disease. 

With an increase in the degree of vascular disease 
there may be pain at rest. People frequently get up at 
night to rub a painful leg. They find the pain is less 
when it hangs down in a sitting position. These sym- 
ptoms are more severe and imtreated the loss of a limb 
could occur. 

Next in line of severity is the sudden onset of pain, of- 
ten intense in a leg. . This can occur after a person has 
been working in a squating position for some time or 
even while they are at rest. This suddeness of onset even 
if it gradually improves demands equally suddeness of 
treatment. This pain may represent a complete 
blockage of blood flow to a leg. 

With modem techniques, exact and qualitative 
measurements can be made to determine the degree of 
vascular compromise. These office procedures are no 
more uncomfortable than thetakingof blood pressure. 
If there are signs of more extensive vascular disease then 
those individuals need hospitalization for x-ray study of 
the vessels. Some people with vascular disease may even 
require sirgery. The goal of everyone should be to spot 
a problem early and seek medical attention! If the 
cramping is vascular in origin then a program of exer- 
cise under a physidans care may prevent prbgress to 
reconstructive surgery or even amputation. 



( • 



An expectant mother, when asked 
whether she wants a boy or girl will 
usually reply, "It doesn't matter, as 
long as it's healthy." 

When the baby is bom» the parents 
count fingers and toes and aren't 
satisfied until they are certain 
ev^ythii^ is intact and in- working or- 
d^. 



These same parents will place their 
children's health above all else, insuring 
they eat their vegetables, get the proper 
rest, and receive the best of health care 
through(Mit their young lives. 

Th^, when they become adults, the 
chances are they will rate their health 
and the health of their children highest 
among things needed to «isure a full 
and happy life. 



Why? Because our health affects the 
quality of every facet of life: work, 
play and rest. 

With this in mind, the Virginia Beach 
Sun, Chesapeake Post and their many 
health conscious advertisers present this 
supplement. It is full of tips and advice 
on how to maintain and improve your 
health and we raise our glass, and 
propose a toast ... 



"Here 's To Your Health !! 



99 



Page 4 August 18, 1982 



Nutrition 



Zinc: Right Amoiuit Vital 



A deficiency of a certain mineral could stunt your 
growth, hinder the healing of wounds and severely 
distCH't your senses ot taste and smell. 

On the other hand, taking excessive amounts of the 
same mineral will bring out its ioaac side. 

Just what is this nutrient with the Jekyll-Hyde 
perscHiality? Diink. (It's zinc.) 

Like all trace elements, zinc is required by your body 
in minute amounts <mly. Hence, the wwd "trace." 
Other trace elements include iron, iodine, cqiper, 
manganese, flouride, chrcxnium, selenium and mdybd- 
enum. 

- We've learned most of what we know about zinc's 
importance in nutrition during the past two decades. 
Initial research focused cm the mineral's rde in wouild 
healing after an Air Fcwce study revealed that patients 
recover from surgery faster when zinc is present in 
their diets. 

Later, additional research linked zinc deficiency to a 
rather nasty conditiwi that strikes the senses of taste 



and smell, altering the perceived flavors and odors of 
foods to the point where the victim is too revolted to 
even eat. Phot to this breakthrough, perswis afflicted 
with this cooditioi were usually sent to psychiatrists. 
Still other studies of this trace element were 
conducted in the Middle East, where many people exist 
on zinc-deiicient diets. There, researchers found that, 
in some cases, dwarf-like boys began to grow once zinc 
was added to their diets. 

A miracle mineral? Not really. Just oie of many 
nutrients your body needs. And, like other nutrients, 
"more" is not necessarily "better." In fact, taking 
"megadoses" of zinc can have disastrous results. The 
person who pops too many zinc supplements will find 
out rather quickly how this mineral can wreak havoc in 
his intestinal tract and cause vomiting. 

TTiat's why the best way to get zinc is the natural way 
- fron a variety of foods. Good sources are meat, milk, 
fish and eggs. 



Calcium: No Bones About It Or Without It 



Laurence M. Hursh, M.D. 

Consultant 

National Dairy Council 

It's the most abundant 
iqineral in your body, ac- 
wunting for l.S percent 
of your total weight. It's 
also the mortar needed for 
a continuous construction 
job-one that lasts you 
whole life. 

Calcium. There's little 

debate in nutrition circles 

over just how vital this 

mineral is for strong, 

^healthy bones. 

"The importance of 
calcium in human 
nutrition is well documen- 
ted," says Anthony 
Albanese, Ph.D., Director 
of the Geriatric Nutrition 
Laboratory in Rye, N.Y. 



"Calciiun is necessary for 
skeletal growth and main- 
tainance as well as for 
several physiological 

processes. Throughout 
one's life, a consistent and 
reliable source of dietary 
calcium is needed." 

Though your bones 
don't get any bigger after 
you reach your adult 
height, they still continue 
to grow in a sense, hard at 
work repairing and re- 
forming themselves. And 
to carry out this ongoing 
task, they require calcium. 

In fact, your bones 
replace 20 percent of their 
calcium content each year. 

You need calcium for 
other purposes, too. It 
helps your muscles- 



including your heart- 
properly contract and 
relax. It also keejM your 
neuromuscular req)onse 
finely tuned. (Just touch a 
hot iron if you want to 
learn what your 
neuromuscular response 
is.) 

Where do you get 
calcium? 

Milk and milk group 
foods are your best sour- 
ces. In fact, two 8 oz. 
glasses of milk i provide 
you with three-fourths of 
the adult RDA. Further- 
more, most milk is 
fortified with vitamin D, 
which helps you adsorb 
the calcium you need. 

Of course, other foods 
besides milk contain 



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calcium. Sardines and 
salmon (with bones) are 
fairly good sources. So 
are turnip greens, colburd, 
sweet potatoes and soya 
products. 

In any case, your best 
bet is to get calcium 
naturally-from the food it 
comes in. 



Will Vitamin 
Supplements Help? 



Lauren<» M. Hanh, M.D. 

ConaultaBt 

National Dairy Council 

Dear Doctor: Two yews 
ago, I was diagnosed as 
having an enlarged liver 
caused by chronic hepat- 
itis. Are there any 
vitamin supplements I 
fhouM take for my cond- 
ition? 

The most important' 
thing you can do to assist 
your liver in doing its job 
is to refrain from drink- 
ing alcdiol. As for 
special vitamin supple- 
ments, f(X-get it. You 
can get alt the nutrients 
you need ~ vitamins and 
otherwise - simply by 
eating a variety (k foods 
from the four basic food 
groups. 

Dear Doctor: My 87- 
ycar-oM motlwr often 
has pnnrie sfMls on her 
sidn. Ifeese spots are 
not pcrmaKnt and una- 
Uy fiule several days 
after they've appeared. 
But is there any way we 
can inrtTcnt them aB 
togcOcr? 



The spots are probab- 
ly caused by an increas- 
ed fragility of the subcu- 
taneous capillaries, tho- 
se just beneath the skin. 
There is little to do fo- 
these spots otter than 
making sure your moth- 
er gets adequate am- 
ounts of vitamin C. 
Good sources of vitamin 
C are citrus fruits and 
juices. 

Dear Doctor What 
foods should I eat to get 
fiber in my diet? 

Good sources of fiber, 
ot "roughage," include 
raw fruits and vegeta- 
bles, whde grain breads 
and whde grain cereals 
(usually labeled "high 
fiber"). Fiber is import- 
ant in your diet because 
it aids in oonnid eUnaina- 
tion. 

Do you have a nutrit- 
ion question for Dr.' 
Hursh? Write "Nutri- 
tion for Today," P.O. 
BoK 721, Rosemont, DL 
60018. Answers to ques- 
tions amy appeu in fu- 
ture columns. 



The 
Heritage 
Book Store 

319LaskinRd. 
Virginia Beach 

(804)428-0400 



The Heritage Store 

317 Laskin Road 
Virginia Beach 

(804)428-0100 
"Good Health is Your Heritage'' 

NaturalFoods 

Her< ^S 

Edgar Cayce Items 

Nutritional 

Supplements 



The Source for 
Books & Tapes on: 

Managing Your Healttf 
Diet & Exercise 
Meditation & Inspiration 



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T, Th, Sat 

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!^- 5:30 Mi& J Thru Satl 



August 18, 1982 r»tt 5 



CGH dietitians Elaine Tible 
and Maria Maximo answered 
questions on nutrition, at the 
recent Chesapeake Wellness 
Day. The event was sponsored 
by Chesapeake General 
Hospital and The Chesapeake 
Health Department. 




Backaches Suffered By Many People 



By Colin W. Hamilton, M.D. 

Virciiiia Beach Orthopedic Associates. Inc. 

Backache k such a common problem ttet most 
people tuffer at least one disturbing backache 
sometime is their lifetime. Fortunately, the cause 
of backache is usually not serious, and the pain 
can usually be rdieved with a few days of home 
care. Often too much money is wastwi today on 
expensive treatments and therapies that are not 
really necessary. As an orthcqiedic surgeon, I fed 
it is important to teach people how to relwve their 
own back symptoms and prevent further attacks. 
When severe bat^ pain first strikes, re^ is^ost 
portant. Backaches will usu^y subside nicely 
with several days of rest and common analgesic 
medications, such as aspirin (v TyloMiU Althmigh 
relief may not be comf^Ot after tevttti days, 
usually there coztfto«« to be gradval im- 
{H-ovonent, so that nndical evaluadon or treat- 
ment is not really necessary. 

Recurrent teckadws can usually be imnrented 
by staying in good physical coiKlition, by gating 
at least a mo<terate amount of r^ular exorcise. 
While I do not fawM' esstaaa whidi tnvohre ex- 
tremes of btK^ mo^oa, maimainmg good muscle 
toiw aiui fledhility co^dnly heli» to prevrat fur- 
ther.back trouble, .^te commonly, obesity or at 
least a very protrulM^ant abdomoi (pot belly) will 
cause exce^ive Mess on the low back and 
prcnnote the "sway back" posture that is so 
fiequen^ asso<^aM with backache. It is always 
wise to ^ a firm mattress, so that this "sway 
back" posture is avoided when lying on the 
stomach. Naturally, lifting heavy objects from 
the floor by bending over is never a good idea. 



Squatting down to lift heavy objects will result in 
much less stress on the back. 

In cases where a few days of rest does not lead 
to gradual improvement, medical evaluation is 
usually necessary. Hopefully, on the basis of a 
history and physical examination, the doctor can 
rule out the possibility of a serious form of back 
trouble. If he has any doubts, then X-rays can be 
taken. Most of the time, no further evaluation or 
treatmoit is required and the patient does well, with 
further rest, perhaps some gentle flexion exercise, 
and possibly also one of the newer-narcotic pain 
medications. 

Soious causes of back pain, such as a herniated 
disc (slipped disc) are fortunately rare and usually 
dete^iAle by the physician. Unially, even with a 
to-niated disc, the usual kinds of treatment 
iccommmded above are often successful. But in 
cases whidi do not respond, admiui(m to the 
h(»i»tiU is usually necessary. Then, a myelogram 
IH-ocedure can be performed to conflrm the 
location of the difficulty. During this procedure, 
a iwedle is inserted m the spinal canal (a sinnal 
tap) and a dye solution is u^ected which outlines 
the spimd cord and tlw nerves, thereby making it 
possible to see the location of the henidAt«l disc. 
Ova- the last several years, this procedure has 
become virtually painless, as the new dye which is 
now used can be injected through a very small 
needle and does not need to be removed, as it is 



absorbed into the bloodstream and excreted by the 
kidneys. Patients who are found to demonstrate 
clear cut evidence of a herniated disc syndrome 
generally recover promptly when the herniated 
portion of their disc is surgically exercised. 

One of the new advances in the care of the back 
has been the identification of another of the 
serious forms of back trouble, the so called 
"spinal stenosis syndrome." This condition can 
result when a person's spinal canal has grown to 
be too small for the spinal cord and the nerves 
within, because of a massive outgrowth of ar-' 
thritic spurs. The new myelogram dye mentioned 
above has helped make this condition much easier 
to diagnose as has the C.A.T. scanner, the newly 
developed high resolution X-ray machine that can 
take essentially three dimensional X-rays. 
Surgically opening up the spinal canal can be a 
great reUef for patients with the spinal stenosis 
syndrome. 



However, one should not be overly concerned if 
a doctor tells than that there are arthritic chang^ 
or spurs on their routine X-rays. We all develop! 
these X-rays changes as part of the normal process V 
of aging, and generally rest and pain relievers for a ^ 
few days is all that is needed before improvement 
is felt. We should not fear that "arthritis" or 
"spinal stenosis" is necessarily going to take over 
our bodies and make us a back cripple forever. 



Dr. Aim R. Cook 
Podiatrist - Foot Specialist 

orwuMtncM the opentag of 

Churchland Podiatry Center 

108 AiiMric^ L^M RooJ 

Chmt^fMtJm.Vb^nia 

MF 8.30-5.0) So*. 9.-00-I2.50 

m4-9n5 



Four Basic Food Groups Offer 
All The Nutrients Your Body Needs 



■."«** 



In nutrition circles, they're the Four Pillars of Truth: 
Milk. Meat, Fruits and Vegetables, Grains. 

But why fcHir? And why these four? There are, after 
all, many other ways to classify foods . For instance, we 
could think of foods in terms aS two major groups 
instead: plant and animal foods. 

Of we could classify foods t^ color. Or by texture. 
Or shape. 

So why those four? 

Ihe diviskxu. actually, are &r from arbitrary. In 
£bu:s, they're based on years of resean:h. 

Your body reqmres as many as 50 different nutrients 
for a wide ruige of purposes. Ihese nutrients fiall into 
SB classes: protein, carbohytkate, fat, vitamins, 
minerals and water. 

Eaek«f^fMr §sed groiq» k coostruettd vpaa key. 
or "tettisr," aurients from several of these dasses. 
For imttuwe, the mett tnnp has as its foundation 
ivotein, madn ami thiamin Qxfth vitanuns) ai^ iron (a 
minend). 



Combined, the four food groups thus compliment 
each other, providing yew with all the leader nutrients ~ 
as well as the trace nutrients your body requires in 
minute amounts only - you need few good health. 

Eating well-balanced meals from the four food 
grcxips also gives you these nutrients in their right 
portions. This is something the fdks who skip meals in 
favor of nutrient supplement pills sometimes fail to 
realize. As a result, tlwy often shortchange themselves 
of a particular nutrient and end up malnourished. Or. 
ilLtqioe cases, they overdose ~ usually on a vitamin or 
mineral - uid end up extremely ill. . 

An example of the latter is "hypervitaminosis A," a 
condition that results from taking too much - you 
guessed it ~ vitanun A. It can cause severe headaclMS, 
loss ci body hair and joint pain. 

In the long run. the four food groups aiq^oach to 
^MritMD is more than just a safe, sound ami sensible 
ooe. 

h's also a mtural one. 



Page 6 August 18, 198Z 



Facts You Should Know About Chriopractic 



Dr. John E. Thomassy 
Director, Thalia Chiropractic Center 

Chiropractic is the second largest of the three 
primary health care providers in the U.S. In their 
order of size, based on number of practitioners 
and public utilization, they are allopathic or 
medical, chiropractic and osteopathic branches of 
the healing arts. 



There are approximatdy 20,000 doctors of 
chiropractic serving millions of patients. Accor- 
ding to a study made by the American Chiroprac- 
tic Association, thei^ has been a 77% ino-ease in 
utilization of chiropractic during the 10 year 
period of 1964-1974. The growth pattern indicates 
that the figures are substantially higher today. 



• All SO states, Puerto Rico and the District of 
Columbia have statutes recognizing and regulating 
the practice of chiropractic as an independent 
health service. 

• Chirc^ractic health care is provided for in such 
federal programs a« Medicare, the Government 
Bnployees Hospital Association Benefit Plan, 
The Mailhandlers Benefit Plan, and the Post- 
masters Benefit Plan. 

• Chiropractic benefits are provided f<w in health 
insurance policies of virtually every nugor in- 
surance carrier, and State Workmen's Comper- 
sation. A substantial number of major inter- 
national, national and local labors unions (»'ovide 
diiropractic services in their health and welfare 

, plans, as do many major industrial onployers. 



• State licensed and regulated, the doctor of 
chiropractic's training requires a minimum of six 
years of college study and clinic intonship prior to 
entering private pr|ictice. The areas of science 
studies are thme pertinent to health care of human 
beings, including anatomy, bacteriology, 
pathology, physiology, biochemistry. pedliUrics, 
geriatrira, spinal manipulation. X-ray, nutrition, 
physical therapeutics and many othor appropriate 
subjects. 

The profe»ional accrediting agency for chiroprac- 
tic ccrileges is the Commisnon on Accreditation of 
the Coiuidl on Oiiroinractic Education (CCE). 
Hie Accrediting Commission of Education of the 
U.S. Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare. It is included in the (^wrtmoit's Ibt of 
natiooally recogni«d acoediti^ agencies and 
associations. 



A" 



f 



Give *em Water Coach, Please! 



In case you haven't noticed, it's that time of year 
again: football season. And hard at practice oa the 
playing fields of high schods, colleges and universities 
across the country are swarms of young athletes - 
drilling and scrimmaging under a sometimes sizzling 
September sun. 

Toiling in torrid temperatures without proper 
precautions can carry players to the verge of heat 
stroke and, in some cases, even death. Yet there are 
still coaches who, comfcHtably directing play from the 
sidelines, forget what it's like out there on the field. 
They fcx^get how quickly their players ~ especially 
interior linemen ~ become dehydrated during rigorous 
practices cm hot days. 

Thus we hear, seascxi after season, stories of football 
players ~ mostly high schod students ~ who cdlapse 
(Ml the field and die of heat strd». The tragedy of this 
is that almost all such deaths are preventable. 

Cbaches must remember the vital need athletes have 
f(x water under these circumstances. In fact, they 
should even insist that each of their players drink water 
befwe, during and after practice. Otherwise, an 
athlete will rely sdely oa his sense of thirst and replace 
only (Mie-half to two-thirds of the water he has lost 
through sweating. 

And what happens when this water's not replenish- 
ed? 

Let's say, for example, a player has lost water equal 
to a mere 2.2 percent of his total body weight. Even at 
this point, his perfcvmance may drc^ significantly. If 
that loss equals 3 percent, his pulse rate and body 
temperature jump. At 6 percent, his respiratwy rate 
increases and his blood vdume drops. He also 
experiences nausea, difficulty in movement and 
emotional instability. 

At a water loss equal to 9 percent of his body weight, 
the athlete almost invariably suffers heat stroke. 

To make certain their players dcm't become 
dangerously dehydrated, coaches should weigh them in 
before and after practice. The rule of thumb fa- 
replacing water lost through sweating is simply 8 oz. for 



every half-pound dropped. Immediately priw and 
during practice, cdd water is best. After practice, this 
replenishment can also come from milk and fruit juices. 

There are, other measures coaches can tal» to 
safeguard against heat strdce on the field. They can 
plan early-seasoo practices that will allow their players 
to become slowly acclimated to both heat and exercise. 
They can also be sure their players have light, 
loose-fitting uniforms ~ preferably the kind with 
short-sleeve net jerseys. 

But the most imp<Htant safeguard remains water - 
and lots of it. 





Slumped over, twisted up, spread 
out - boy - that's real comfort. 
When you do your studying you 
should feci at ease-that's good 
for you but, remember your pre- 
cious eyes. The Better Vision In- 
stitute recommends good light 
coming over one shoulder; keep 
your reading matter at least six- 
teen inches from your eyes and 
sit up as straight as you comfort- 
ably can. 



"^B^lSV^" 



HAVE YOUR EYES 
EXAMINED REGULARLY 

DR. G.W. PEGRAM, JR. 

OPTOMETRIST 

1109 PofaMlcxtcr Stnti 
CiMsapcdw,Vtrgtaia 

PhoA: 54S-3930 



Chiropractic Care 



Most 

Insurance 

Covers 

Chiropractic 




Tired 
of being 

Sick? 

CALL 

348-2817 

Today! 



Dr. John E. Thomassy and Staff 




Exanvleofpoor 
ipiaai stmcture. 



Eleven Danger 
Signals 

1. Nunibnessioamu and hands 

2. Restkss ni^ts 

3. I'ain between shoulden 

4. Stiffness of neck 
3. Nctvc tension 

6. DeptemOB 

7. Headaches 

8. Aaxi^ in the chest 

9. Stifftiess OT pain in lower back 

10. Tbedhqwaadlep 

11. Painful joinu 




Bxam|rfe of good 
^NBalstt^Mwe. 



OPEN 

MON.— WED. 

FRI. 

EVENING 

•TIL 7 PM 

4136BoiiiieyRd. 



FOR AN APPOINTMENT 
CALL 340-2817 T(M>AY 

Over4 Years At This Location 



OPEN 

TUES.& 

THUI^. 

MORNINGS 



Near Pembroke M«U Vli«|Bte Badi 



^■^IM^Mi^Mk. 



Augost IS, 1982 n^e? 



Health & Beaut y 



Hair Can Be Restored 



"Hair i^ain" is prwiscly what many Tidewater 
resideQts are saying these days because thdr hair is 
growii^i again where there once was none. These folks 
credit a new product called Jojoba Pro Shampoo when 
the treatments are given in local beauty salons. 

The first person in Virgiiiia Beach to experience, this 
exdtment was Bill Dubosky. His company, D & D 
Marketing distributes Jojoba Pro in Tidewat^. Before 
Mr. bubpsky decided to sell the product, he used It for a 
time to see what r^ts it might expect. 

Dubocky bad been losing hair for about 12 to 14 years 
ami A^thi^g seeming to slow his hair lose down. After 
using the shkmtioo at {ifst, tm hair stopp^ falUng out. 
Then, in about 2Vi months, he started to see actual tiair 
growth. 

^^^KMiftlft' w<»ks" laid hiai&raa^ Sftodi Gluckle who 
Uri^t^ Duboi^ty #101 ttie Jojoba |«oe^. ^'Vvene^er 
i^ m^Qiing like it" he said TcbGOfy, "My scalp Js 
much hodthio: and the hair is growing like crai^,." * 

Now ^ter only 2 months of selling the shampoo in 
Tideiotter there have been 1 3 people who w^xqsorted 
positive results to thdr faairdreno^. i - 5- 

Ms. Gluckle of Sandi's Shear Design reports several 
instances of new hav growth, <m o^f^ processed hair, 
custom«i with psortaas and sriKMrhea. 



I LOST 71 
POUNDS! 

m JUST NINE WEMKSt 




— 1 SAYS 

i ART 

'\ FREEMAN 
OF 

VIRGINIA 
BEACH 




zitw 



My hMBh wai poor and I dkJnt JlKp v«y ««• « 
night I was even «*nfl^wp*SP* ■»? •"f?? 
ifMHT noddhg ai Hie ttni*w whed wHte dtMng. 
My blood prawn WB veiy N|^ and I knew that I 
had ID do soRMNno. I had tried ottw dtos befn« 
and Ihey Jutf dttit ic«m K> (tute do ttteiob. so I 
««ttdtheQi^WeightU)HCIniclk«7l bsin 
9 nvceM My watt WR« dowm ftom a ilM 50 U a 
UK 42 smce r«« tost that vMi^ m oudook on 
He has chanoed. t ami now aMe iD-sfccp al nli^ 
andmysexMistietKr. 

tf MM tulfcr from obeii^ and want to do some- 
ttina about k. I suioest you contact the Outt 
WMht U»s OHO. mey can help you to get iMdc 
kiu^ main stmrn or MrwWwut star>*ig your- 
seM 



• NoUvKl 




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l|r ftiflM and wpvvlfed 
Wc ara TMtwMH'f IwgM and NKHt suennfU wc^M loH 
prowMi. Our jMMram to mictmM Imcwm our iMdentt 
mftrit now for A»M oonwRaitord 

Cuick HiBioht 
icssCliiiics 

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Sharon RusseU owner and operator of "Hair It Is" 
has alsQ seen i»w hair growth on two of ha customers 
she said several oistoaiers, using Jojoba Pro duunpoo at 
home have noticed a rcsi&rkable improvement in hair 
condition and their ability to manage their hair. One of 
ho- operators, Connie Honne has givoi her husband 2 
hair treatments and he was reportedly using the Jojoba 
Pro at home. She stated "The condition of his hair has 
never been better." 

The Jojoba Pro ishampoo is only available in beauty 
salons. It consists of a 4 ounce t>ottle of shampoo and 
Vi ounce of Jojoba oil • enough for 40 to 60 shampoos. 
According to Mr. Dubosky. it is a result of 40 years of 
research by a Dr. Javier A. Gomez who found that 
Jojoba oil alone was not effective in removing the 
sebum deposits which are the most common cause of 
baldness. His shampoo is a fermented mixture of 
tropical herbs and the Jojoba plant itself. "The only 
one of it's kind on the market today" said Dubosky. 



Obesity! 



Courtesy of 
Doctors Quick Weight Loss Clinics 

Obesity shortens life and brings early onset of or 
significantly contributes to a myriad of illness, such as 
diab^es, high>blood pressure, stroke, hardening of the 
arteries, debilitation of bones resulting in arthritis, 
fatique and even mental depression. 
Obesity contribute to a poor self-esteon, a feeling of 
failure or ^spair which further add to internal conflict 
or tension within the family unit. 

By losing unnecessary fat. less stress is jldaced on the 
beurt, omilatory syMcan aa«l othor inajor organs of the 
body resuming in increased longevity under ncHmal ctr- 
cunBMances. 

Sodal, family, persoiud and im>fessional rdatitmships 
take on new meaning. Job opportunities and 
praoMMioQS become achievaUe and oaes al^ty to join 
in qwrts and other social ftmctkws are modi easier to 
acUeve. 



Blistered Lips 



q: I'm prone to cold 

sores and fever blisters. 
Does the sun aggravate 
this condition? 

A: Officially known as 
a natural sunscreen agent. 
Therefore, lips - par- 
ticularly the lower lip 
which is more directly ex- 
posed to the sun's rays - 
burn much easier than 
other skin. It's important 
to use a medicated Up 
conditioner *ith PABA 
sunscreen protection such 
a Blistex when you are ex- 
posed to sun and wind. 

While Americans are 
becoming more informed 
about the sun's dangers, 
some of us still neglect to 
protect one of our most 
sensitive areas - the lips. 

Dr. Tony E. Jones, 
Professor of Midicinal 
Chemistry at the Univer- 
sity of Colorado and 
Director of Research for 
Blistex Inc., has supplied 
these answ«^ to questions 
many people face. 

Q: Why do I get sun 
Misters on my lips when I 
go to the beach? 

A: Sun blisters are 
caused simply by overex- 
posure to sun. Thoe tiny 
blisters of toi f(Min in a 
line along t)ie border 
whoe IH> skin meets nor- 
mal skin. A sun blistCT on 
the lip is similar to a 
Uij^r on the foot caused 



by physical rubbing. The 
body rushes fluid to an 
area which is under siege. 
Lips are susceptible 
because of their delicate 
tissue and need special 
protection. 

Q: Why do my lips 
become dry and burned 
even though I tan readily? 

A: Lips simply don't 
tan, but they do biun. 
This is because lip skin 
does not contain melanin, 
a dark pigment present in 
other skin which is 
brought to the surface by 
the sun and acts as herpes 
simplex, and cold sore is 
actually a virus causing 
recurring blisters on the 
lips. Persons with a ten- 
dency towards herpes 
simplex blisters should 
avoid excessive exposure 
to sun, wind and glare. 
Lips become vulnerable 
because their cells are 
thinner than in other parts 
of the body. Ointments 
may be used to soften the 
crusts of the blisters and 
relieve pain and itching. 

Q: My lips become 
swollen and cracked when 
I go out into the sun. Is 
there a name for this 
problem? 

A: It sounds as though 
you suffer from cheletis 
actinica. But these sym- 
ptoms are serious enough 
that you should see a doc- 
tor. 



Bums High On Summertime Hazard List 



TIm summertime is a 
wfHideiful seascm, but did 
ytm know that ito poten- 
tial ftff harm is high? Way 
up <Hi the list of sumffl»- 
tinoe hazards it the bum. 
How a burn iMals depends 
very much uptm liow it is 
treated. Howeva, reorat 
medical re^vdi iiKiicates 
that most of the common 
kmwledge that we have 
about how to treat a bum 
is erroneous . . . .and. 



scMMdnMi, dangermisl 

The nooat imptntant fir- 
st ^)p in treattag a bum is 
identifying exactly how 
i»ious it is. Whether it 
results from your 
back^ud fMurbccue, ex- 
pMure to the mmmer wn 
or a kitdien aecMoit, it is 
essmtial that you kaom 
how to idoitify the c^ree 
of the bum, if you are 
going to h^ yourself (n 
someone in your family. 



A bum is classified by 
bow d£q>ly it peiwtrates 
the skin. In a first degree, 
bum tlw outside of the 
sldnisbumed. The skin is 
red and feds painful. It is 
dry, not broken or 
blisto^ and tippean to be 
mildly swollen. In a 
sectmd degree bum ^^ 
deeper layen of skin are 
bumed. It is very painful 
and the skin appean red 
or blotdiy. A secoiul 



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degree bum will appearto^ 
be blistered,, swollen, 
moist and oozing. A third 
degree burn is most 
serious of all. ''lie skin is 
burned through and ap- 
pears white, or may be 
charred black. Uttte or 
no pain is experience, 
because nerve endings 
/ have been burned away. 

More information 
about bums and how to 
treat them is available in a 
free booklet from Curity, 
entitled, "How You Can 
Hdp Heal in Your Own 
Home." To order it send 
your name and address 
and .3tK to cover p<»tage 
and haiulling to: Curity 
Booklet, P.O. Box 2883, 
Hillside. New Jersey 
07205. 

Remember, one of the 
m(»t important steps that 
anyone can take in the 
treatment of a burn is to 
keep a level head. Panic 
may cause you to under or 
overestimate the 
soiousness of a bum. 
^^Haise the situation as 
calmly as possible and if 
you have any doubts at all 
about your judgement, 
oil a (toctM at once. 



Page 8 August 18, 1982 




Low Cholesterol Not Enough 



You probably know the fellow. 

He's overweight. He's a boozer and a 
smoker. He doesn't get enough sleep or excer- 
cise. 

And if you happen to express any concern 
over his state of health, he's likely to tell you: 
"Don't worry about me or my ticker. I'm 
watching my cholesterol these days." 

Sound familiar? Perhaps. Sound logical? 
HarcHy. But it's the sort of "reasoning" that's 
becoming popular. And it's usually expoun- 
ded with deadfast certainty. . 



But on the other hand, we don't yet know 
how arterial plaque is formed or how 
cholesterol becomes a part of it. Nor do we 
know the origin of diolesterol found in 
plaque-whether it comes from food or the 
body itself. (Almost every cell in your body 
contains cholesterol.) 

We don't even have solid evidence that a 
low-cholesterol/high polyunsaturated fat diet 
can actually prevent heart attacks. States a 
recent Consumer Union study of diet and 
heart disease: "What one would expect to 



happen on the basis of population com- 
parisons and laboratory evidence has yet to be 
demonstrated in prsu^ux. ' ' 

We do know, however, a thing or twQ about 
heart disease. And one is that obesity, 
smoking, excessive drinking, inadequate sleep 
and inadequate exercise will make you a prime 
candidate for it. 

Do you have a nutrition question for Dr. 
Hursh? Write "Nutrition for Today," P.O. 
Box 721, Rosemont, IL 60018 



»< The fact is, there are few things about 

cholesterol we can accurately call "certain- 
ties." On one hand, we know that arterial 
plaque—the "rust" that builds up on the inner 



walls of major arteries, often restricting blood 
flow to the heart and brain—contains 
cholesterol. 

We also know that eating saturated fat tends 
to increase the amount of cholesterol. And we 
know that many-though not all-persons with 
coronary heart disease have more serum 
cholesterol than normal. 



Lowering Your Blood Pressure 



There are many good drugs to lower blood 
pressure. And your doctor will prescribe what he 
feek is best for you. Many doctors will tell you to 
take "water pills." Tliese pills he^ rid the body 
of too much salt and vaitx. This makes it easier 
for the blood to move through the body. And the 
heart does not have to pump as har4. 

There are othir medicines your doctor might 
prescribe for hypertension. Some bring blood 
pressure down by working on the blood vessels. 
Others slow down the heart. Whatever your doc- 
tor tells you to take will only work ffyou take it as 
you're told. Many people forget to take their 



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HMdicine. Sonne peo|^ just take it whm they fed 
bad. Others stop taldng it becMise they feel <4cay. 
This is dangerous. Your blood pressure can go 
right back up to where it was, or hi^er and cause 
serious damage. 

Fwtunately. high blood pttssoK can be 
lowered jud kept down. But itcamot be cund. 
Control of U^ blood jH-cssure can reduce die 
chance of stroke, heart attack w kidney dmase. 
So it's vwy important to ^art treatmmt early and 
stick with it. 

You may have to take medicine for the rest of 
your life to keep yourbloodpressure right. If you 
don't take your medicine, your blood prasure will 
rise again. But taking it will hdp keep your blood 
pressure low and under control. 

Your doctor might also want you to stay away 
from certain food. He might tell you to cut down 
the amount of salt you eat. Too much salt can 
make hypertension worse even if your're taking 
your medicine. 

If you weigh too much, you're already making 
your heart work too hard. You may be put on a 
diet to lose weight. 

Smoking can make high blood pressure rise 
even higher. That's why it's important to stop 
smoking or at least try to cut down. 

Exercise may be good for you. Ask your doctor 
or nurse before you start . 



Two Million Suffer Chest Pains 



Over two milli<m Anwricans raner 
from chest pain that doctors term 
angina p«:toris. Some operience this 
pain after physical exercise. Boctors 
ajl this angina-of-effort. For others, 
ti» mdn seems to oaair without 
fkyiAai strera. This is kaown as 
angma-at-nst. 

Most often associated with ar- 
therc^clerotic heart disease, angina is 
iMtw^t on wlKn evo- tte heart is not 
^tii^ enough oxygen to tHetH its 
Meds. 

If you think you have angina pec- 
toris ot if you have u^xplained cl^ 
paui,.youshouki see your physidu. A 
doctor is the only one who can 
diagnose the iUness and prescribe for 
it. 

Of into^^t to patients with angina is 
iKWs of a dnig that has rec^dy 
receivwl approval from the U.S. Food 



and Drug Administntiim. Its generic 
name is vsapamil HCI, tht prototype 
of a new class of dn^ iq ^ Uni^ 
States cafled caldura anU^CHUstt. 
These drugs rei^esent a ^nificcDt 
breakthrough in cardiovaseuUr 
thenqjy. 

Verapamil HCI, marketed hat wi- 
der tie naaw CataHiM 1^ Sei^ Pt|W- 
maceuticals Inc., has been us^ in 
more than 100 ^luntries during the 
past iwb demkt. It lias aeoMMdi^ 
mOT^thas 3.8 million pwd^-yearx of 
oqp^toKe. 

The drug works to restive tte bakm- 
ce bitwttn the iMart's w^fgm sun^y 
and its demand, altowing « greater 
tolerance for excise. Searte offidids 
better that Odan shooM ^ve an^na 
l»tiaits a "green light" for miKh m«e 
phy^^ witivity. 




August 18, 1982 Page 9 



avsi 




K^OiiUi 



How good are you at 
maintaining good health? 

All of us wmt good htaJth . But many of us forget that everyone 
is resporisiblefcir muntaining his or her good health. It's not a 
matter of luck. You've got to work at it. Test yourself. Find out 
how much you know about first aid, accident prevention, reduc- 
ing your risk of heart disease and home nursing skills. This is 
not a pass or fail test. Its purpose is to tell you how well you're 
doing in maintaining good health. 



What should you do to coiMror 
bleeding from a wound? - 

a Apply pfcssure directly over 

the wound. 
h Run cold water over the 

wound. 
(■ Apply a tourniquet. 



What is the most effective way 
) to begin chaBging.a personal risk 
t faiptof for heart disease? 

a Doiil worry ahotftit- 

b Set a deadline dale for change. 

c Identify the situaiicms and con- 
ditions which influence the 
behaviors) you wish to chan^. 

d Work harder at developing ^ 
willpower. 



The best place to check the 
pulse in an emergency is at the: 



' OverWeigl^ individuals are 
) H grejler risk for 

a Diabetes. 

b Gall bladder disease, 

c High blood pressure. 

d All of the above. 



' What are the most common 
symptoms of high blood pressure? 

a DizziiMss. 
^Headaches. 
. c Heart palpitations. 
d No symptoms, usually. 



8 



flow can you tell if your blood 
pressure is up or down? 

a By how you feel, physically. 
h By your emotions, 
r By your pulse rate. 



a Upper arm. 
h Neck. 
' WriM. ^ 
d Thigh." 

Which heat bums may be cooled 
in water? 


d By having it checked regularly. 

After an accident, there is no sign 
of blood. The victim has cold, 
moist skin and feels pain and 
£^ tenderness in the abdomen 
'f The victim probably has: 



(( Thin burns thai are not open. 
h Deep bums that are open. 
(' All heat burns. 
d hio heat bums. 



\bu should wait at least 10 minutes 
before taking the temperature if 
the person has been: 



Pulmonary arrest. 
An infection. 
An internal injury. 
Cardiac arrest. 



10 



Running. 
Smoking. 
Drinking coffee. 
Eating Ice cream. 
All of the above. 



Which of the following nutritional 
statements is not correct? 

a Eggs are a good source of protein. 
h Vitamin D helps build strong 

bones and teeth, 
r Vitamin C maintains muscle tone'. 
d Good sources of vitamin A are 

green and yellow vegetables. 



. (I)« (2)r 0)b {4)ti (5)e 
A^)di7)d md (9)< <I0)< 
SeonWpiMius far each itmeii luiswer. 
100 or 90-^ ExcHlai : Yair Mns»ven dtitw 

siHi'iriiwiirr <iflkf imporhime Dftmihi- 
laming gnod health. Tuxt rememhei: you 
(tin ctdllM Cntu amiime unyime in 
xmffmmly h^s k^MfMiJUritlkm. 

80or70-~Gaad : Bm,ihtrr's nmmfiifim- 
prmemem. CuU RtdCrmsfor « '«'*>* «^ 
ihe hetillh und Hifery cmnes tiruihihle at 
your locut chapter. 

6 Q or ^m\ — Yim need help ! Leorti htm 
to take better aire of yourself mul your 
fiimily. Call yintrtwamt RedCnns tlutp- 
ler. ComtIeK lives have been uived 
through safety and health skills karned 
Ihmugh Redtrtits courses. And because 
of these AHh. tmllitms ofAinericmts live 
ufer, ha^er. healthier lit-es. 



^mR' 



ita I Presents: 

ducation Classes 



»mssure Screening Clinic 
obby 



Are you reducing your risk 
of heart attack? 

MostcoiDnary risk factors are preventable, curable or treatable. 
Do you know what they are? Test yourself. Find out how much 
you know about preventing a heart attack This is not a pass or 
fail test. Its purpose is to tell you how much you know about 
avoiding a heart attack. 



Which is a major risk factor 
to heart attack? 

u Higfr blood pressure. 

b Cigarette smoking. 

c High levels of cholesterol and 

fat in the blood. 
d Diabetes. 
e All of the above. 

Which additional factor may 
ft contribute to your risk of 
L heart attack? 



Obesity. 

Family history of heart 

disease. 

Lack of regular exercise. 

All of the above. 

Which health risks are most 
I centrollable by the individual? 

(/ Risks related to your behavior 

and habits. 
b Inherited traits. 
c ftobiemsinyourenvircwiment, 

such as air pollution, highway 

conditions. 
d Cottditions that require care 

from hospitals, doctotx and 

other health professionals. 

If you feel uncomfortable pressure, 
shortness of breath or pain in 
I the center of your chest lasting 
f 2 minutes or more: 

a Drive yourself to a hospital 
immediately. 

h >^^it an hour. It may be heart- 
bum or indigestion. 

f Call an emergency rescue 
service. 

d Leave a message with your 
doctor s answering service. 

' Which foods add to cholesterol 
k in the blood? 



A stroke happens when oxygen-rich 
'' blood is cut off on its way to the brain . 
I Wuning signals of stroke include: 

a Temporary dimness or loss of 
vision, particulariy in one eye. 

b Unexplained dizziness, un- 
steadiness or sudden falls. 

r Sudden, temporary weakness 
or numbness on one side of 
the body. 

d Temporary loss of speech. 

e All of the above. 



Anyone starting a program of 
f regular exercise for cardiovascular 
fitness should: 

a Oo "all out" from the start. 

h Constantly push to increase 
Ihe intensity of activity. 

c Pick activities which are rhyth- 
mic and repetitive. Start slowly. 

d Always stand still or lie down 
immediately after exercising. 



8 



Hypertension means: 



Being nervous and high-strung. 
Feeling very tense. 
Having blood pressure that 
stays higher than normal. 
All of the above. 



I Untreated, high bUHxl pressure 

" can cause which problem .' j^ 

a Slrdke. 
h Heart attack 
( Kidney failure. 
d All of the above. 



10 



Polyunsaturated vegetabia 
oils and margarine. 
Low-fat milk and yogurt. 
Egg yolks, butter and cheese. 
Fish and poultry. 



If you have high bloixl pressure, 
you will need to: 

(/ Take medications as prescribed. 
b Gel your blood pressure 

checked regularly. 
(' Decrease amount of sodium 

(salt) you eat. 
d Lose weight if overweight. 
r Allof die^Ktve. 




tWwrtftfiv 




Ked Cross 



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Mi 11 



Help. Will You? 



<x. 



ANSWERS 
(111- (2ii/ (.^)<( (4). ^5u 
(6)e (7)1 (8)r (9(,/ llOlc 
Store K) points for emh correct answer. 
lOOor 90 — Excellent : Your answers show 
VMireuM-are t^ihe risk fadors fur avoid- 
ing a heurl attack. Just retnember you can 
call Red Cross anytime anyone in ytnir 
fuinilv needs health instructiim. 
m)or70 — Cooil : Bui. there's room for ini- 
provemenl. Cull Red Cross for u lisling itf 
the health and safety courses available at 
vour UkuI chapter. 

< ^ or below — Yitu need hel p' Learn how 
to lake better ewe (^ ytmr hetu-l. CuU ^vur 
nearest Red Cross chapter 
Countless lives have been .saved through 
safer, and health skills learned thnni^h 
RedCross courses. .And because of these 
Mils, millions irf Americans live saU'i. 
happier, healthier lives 



PkgelO Angut It, 1982 




Chesapeake General Is Community Involvement 



Chesapeake General Hospital is an acute care, 
community facility located in the heart of the rapidly 
growing dty (tf Chesapeake. The hospital was 
chartered by an act ai the General Assembly of the 
Commonwalth of Virginia and opened its doors in 
January, 1976. 



Major construction protjecu have increased the $vx 
of the hospital to 210 beds, including a 14 bed btensive 
Care/Coronary Care Unit with the most sophisticated 
patient mooitering system in Tidewater. Tliere is a 
three-room Oper^ing Suite, a Cystosrapy Room, and a 
two-room Outpatient Surgery Uhit. The nursing units 




^ for the fatare k oac of tkc ouyor .. 
iiMIWet of the Chffpwlrf Hoqiltal Aalhority. The 
tievca Mcahcn aic MMBcd by City Coucii imd scnric 
iHthoM piqr to ripris—l Ac bcrt ialcn^ of the co«- 
MnHjr. MmhcntaMMeCrtaadtaf left to right) End 
D. Cwnm, Ftmkm FortitaWi, WiMcr G. ■roadux, 



Ltewood S. Nctaw» Jr., __^_„__„.„, . 

D.HmmH. Swrtedirft to itgfci aw limit t. ¥— ,ia>, 
Dorothea M. Wadmoitt, hM. UmOk m ^M- 
■iBiitntter DomM 8. Boddcy. MM ttwtmt for At 
pholopmth were IMcrt L. Biwi and W. tturi^ 
' s,M.D. 



inchide subspedalties in orthopedics, cardiac care, 
psychiatry, gynecology, and pedLurics. 

Hie Medical Staff is imposed <rf22S physidans and 
allied health professionals coring care and consultat- 
ion in 29 medial specialties. The patient care and 
ancillary departmeitts are staffed with over 800 
employees providing diagnostic ud Aerapeutic oue. 
The Nursing Service Department imictioes primary 
nursing in all areas of patient care. AH patient rooms 
are privitte. 

Chesapeake General has educational affiUatkxtt with 
CXd Dominion University for mirsiag and physkal 
tben^y. Norfolk StiOe Univentty for nursing, and the 
MedKal Cdtege ofVl^lak for {riuurmacy. 

Ctoae to 6,000 patieitts are adbnitted cadi year and 
24,000 piuients are seen for emeiieiicy care. 
Outp^ient services iiudude laborakxy, x^ray, lAytical 
tlMrapy, surgery, ourdiac diagwstdcs. resfrfratory 
thtnpy, and inilmonvy fow^ion. 

The iMXj^tal is the oen^r ci a nkpdiad comptex 
induding the dty's Heakh Departineitt. two flM<Ucal 
(rf&e iHilldings, a nursing home, and aiMrtments for 
the elderly and hand^iped. 

Co mmu nity invttvenett BKhutei {mjviding meals 
for ^eids on Wlweb mi devekiptag > •trol^; Valuer 
Ser^s program. The hoti»tal ako has a Speakers 
Bureau aiMl c^rs cammii^y health eduauksa and 
health fvomotioa to ei^rio^M, worisers in businets 
md ii^M^, «|^ tiie geiwrd piUlc Tbt »west 
ooonraafty ootfmch li Ue^, « penouriittd 
emeq^fflcy respome system for the elderly and 
ha»dk^q}ed. Chesapeake General Hoa^talte a ^xu^. 
inaoi^tttve l»B|^al . . .grara^ to n^t titt inoeasiog 
demands for peisonaUxed, qim^ heabh caie. 



i^t 



wmmmi 



Angast IS, 1982 P»gc H 





the labotatofy, Jnnlta PMreD, MT [AMI], 
«M dw TechBkon SMA a lUs wdli<hauel 
CMittaNMM Anr aoto uiribmr is capiMe off mufa« 
12-18 ciidcal dMnbtay tests per pi^M. Ust Sscal 
year the SMA U amaifxd 9,815 patfent spedneas. 



DoBiia WratoB, OR tedwlciu, coaceBtralct oa her 
instrunents during saigcry. She is rcspoosible for the 
sterile table of iBstmnieBts, uatidpates the swgeoa's 
needs, and passes the right instrument at the right 
ti^. Last flsod year, the Operatiag Suite handled 
3,897 taipatient cases. 





ABOVE: 

dtmndbrealdng for the CT Souner coBstruction site 
was IwM June 1. The $1,150,000 praject will be 
cmnpleted by the winter ai 1983. laming over the first 
shoveb are [left to right] Vic Roach, president of 
the Chesapeake Chamber vi Comnerce; Sidney M. 
Oman, mayor of Chesapeake; Walter G. Broadnax, 
chatomaa ai the Authority building committee; DonaU 
S. Bnddey, admtaistrator; John A. Cocke, MD,'Chfef <rf 
Ratfol^y; and Joseph L. Yon, MD, Authority 
chainnan. 



RIGHT: 

Pharmacy technician Agnes FahUmer careftilly 
prepares the wroptt dosage for each patfent. Ihc CGH 
PhwmMy ^peves medkatioa in unit dosage to 
assure accwaey and help tower costs. 



lEFT: 

Wetness Day wm ateo a time to learn to excrcbe 
propcfi^ for tfw best resrits. James Re^htkr from the 
YhKA chcda a stt-np for oonect flrom and fUness. 
More tfam 800 pco^ atten&tf Ac i^-kmg event 
spoMrM by GheiapedB General Ros^tal Mf Om 
Cl>esa pe^» HnM Depaittseat. 




i 



.ii»ij.iM-^w^!m^gmmivi 



Page 12 August 18, 1982 



I An 
thlete 
^ Needs 




Water 



Trained athletes know that water is essential to their 
well being, particularly in warm weather situations. 
Newcomers in sports should be especially careful about 
water consumption. 

Joggers - take note: during long periods of exercise, 
water intake minimizes the dehydrating effects of heavy 
sweating. In addition, water reduces stress on the cir- 
culatory system and helps the blood carry energy 
providing carbohydrates to your body's cells. 

Water loss is greater during hot weather since the 
I body perspires more than usual in its efforts to keep 
cool. Exercise increases the perspiration rate, making 
the need for water more important. Maintaining proper 
water balance helps regulate the body temperature and 
prevents overheating. 

Many athletes are turning to filtered water, where 
available, to replenish their bodies' needs. 

For information about filtered water available in our 
local area, contact Beach Water Systems, Inc. P.O. Box 
803 Virginia Beach, Virginia 23451, or call Mr. Bob 
Fredette at (804) 428-2237. 



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PHONE 627-4783 




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Resi- 
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walking 

training 

Resi Walker is a new 
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HOSPITAL FITTINGS 

1613 HILLTOP WEST 

VIRGINL\ BEACH, VA 23451 

Laskin & First Colonial Road * 

Mon.-Fri. lO-S p.m. 
SM. I&'2p.ni. 







JUST HOW SAFE IS YOUR DRINKING WATER??? 

DOES YOUR WATER: 

• HAVE A CHEMICAL, RUSTY, OR MUSKY TASTE? 

• HAVE A "SMELL" OR "ODOR"? 

• IS YOUR WATER CLEAR OR "COLORED"? 

• ARE YOU AWARE OF THE POTENTLU. HAZARDS OF 
CHLORINE USE? 

IF YOU'VE ANSWERED "YES" TO ANY. OR ALL OF THESE QUESTIONS 
THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE OF GREAT IMPORTANCE TO YOU. 

A SYSTEM IS NOW AVAILABLE. AT A LOW COST, THAT WILL 
ELIMINATE 100% OF THESE PROBLEMS. BEST OF ALL. WE NOT ONLY 
DRASTICALLY IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF YOUR WATER. BUT DO SO 
WITH NO MONTHLY SERVICE FEE'S.. .EVER! 

WE OFFER THIS SYSTEM ON A 5 DAY FREE TRLiL PLUS A 10 DAY 
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. OUR SYSTEM IS COMPLETELY EFFECTIVE 
REGARDLESS IF YOU USE WATER FRQM A WELL OR CITY WATER 
WE CARRY A FULL LINE - FROM PORTABLE TO COMPLETE HOME 

SYSimiS- AND YOU'LL BE SURPRISED AT THEIR LOW COSTS IF 
YOU'RE CONCERNED AK)UT THE QUALITY OF YOUR WATER, OR 
WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THIS AMAZING SYSTEM, PI^ASE 
CALL BETWEEN 9 A.M. AND 9 P.M. 

BEAOi WATER SY^HQ^ 

P.O. BOXSCB VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRGINIA 23451 
TELEPHONE: (804)428-2237 



Fact or Foolish? 



Angost 18, 1982 PUge 13 



How well can you separate nutriticm facts from 
fodishness? Here's a chance to find out. See how 
many of these you can answer correctly. 

1. (TVue or False) You should avdd starchy foods if 
you're oo a weight-loss diet. 

2. Whkh ctf the fdlowing vitamins can not be sdd to 
the public as a supplement? 

A. vitamin B-1 

B. vitamin E 

C. vitamin K 

D. none of the above 

3. (True or False) You can purchase natural cheese 
only in health food stofes that sell natural foocfe. 

4. (True or False) Iron deficiency is feirly commcm in 
the U.S. 

5. (TVue or False) Vitamin C, even if taken in 
megadoses, can't harm you because it's a water-'sduble 
vitamin. 



Answers: 

1. False. Starch has taken a bad rap. Tlie fact is, 
starch is a complex carbdiydrate - and dietary 
carbdiydrate is important to your health. Furthermwe, 
many sources (rf starch are sources of fiber, also 
imp<xtant to your health. Losing weight means cutting 
down oa total o^oies - not cutting out vital nutrients. 

2. C. ^^tamin K, the last fat-sduble vitamin 
discovered, helps your blood to clot. You need very 
little of it in your diet. Large doses of K, however, are 
extremely tcodc. For these reasons, the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration has prohilMted its sale to the 
public as a supjdement. 

3. FaUe. Natural cheese, matte by a combinatian oi 
enzyme and bacterial cetivity, has been around a lot 
longer than lualth food stares. You can find it most 
anywhere. 

4. Trae. Iron defidency is especially oommon among 



menstruating women. Pregnant and lactating women 
also have a fairly high iron requirement. For some 
individuals, physicians may recommend an iron 
supplement. 

5. False. Though not as toxic as megadoses of 
fat-soluble vitamins, massive amounts of vttamin C 



\(l(im. 



Cui.aOH. 



may, nonetteless, harm you. Most notably, such 
megadoses can cause kidney damage. There's still a lot 
we have to learn about the benefits of vitamin C ~ 
espectally its rde in the endocrine-system. But it's not 
a miracle nutrient. And, as with all vitamins, more is 
not necessarily better. 



iM> Ar»oiNU«»m— COM! m at rotw coNvmiiMa 

MM (TYII HAIKUT W'lTN All rtlMS 



We see hair as a family afbir . . . With up-to-the- 
minute styling that's iu^ right for the 
young— And the young hrarted. High quality 
Precision Cuts for both gals and guys. 
Expert p»m%. Care-free color. 

■VBtYDAY LOW PBICES: 

Shampoo ft Bfow Dry $5.25 

Shmipoo A Set (Long Hair Extra) $5.25 

Hair Cut (Male or Female) ^.45 

Touch Up from $7.50 

Frostir« (Set Extra) $15.(X) 

Permanent Waves. $12.95 $15.95 $18.95 
$21.95 $26.95 $32.95 

I'm E. UTTIf CBEEK SCAD— NORFOLK. 
NEXT TO ZAYEE DEPABTMENT STORE «»«.« 

PHONE 688-9M3 OPEN 

14SH WARWICl BLVD. — NEWPORT NEWS * DAYS 

WARWICK— DENBIGH SHOPPING CENTER 

raONE 174.1044 HOUKS: 

840 N EWPORT SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER «* t^n- 

INTERSECTION J. CLYDE MORRIS BLVD. * I-«4 "Z ^^^ 
NEWPORT NEWS-J>HONE sec-TOTt Than. 

1012 FREDERICK BLVD. PORTSMOUTH. VA. t>9 PJI. 

MID C3TY SHOPPING CEimR 
PHONE StMttl 



27 WEST MERCURY BLVD., HAMPTON 

LANGLEY SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER 

PHONE 723-8239 

6507 AUBURN DR. VA. BEACH 

COLLEGE PARK SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER 

PHONE 420-6069 

873 S. LYNNHAVEN PKWY. VA. BEACH 
LYNNHAVEN PLAZA— NEXT TO FARM FRESH 
PHONE 468-S366 

HILLTOP PLAZA SHOPPING CTR. 

1700 BLOCK LASKIN ROAD VA. BEACH 

PHONE 428-9807 

^_ 5118 VA. BEACH BLVD. VA. BEACH 
NEXT TO ZAYRE— ACROSS FROM OLD GEX 
PHONE 4t7-f78» 

BAYSIDE SHOPPING CENTER 

4801-E SHORE DRIVE— V A. BEACH, VA. 

PHONE 440-3283 



\ *s Time For You To Hear 
What You *ve Been Seeing 



Senior Citizens 
Discoimts 



r 



&nith-Dunfldd 



B]<^. 




Mcdtatfrawy. 



'Unmi in 




One of the Areas Largest in Hearing 
Aid Service and Repair 

Complete Hearing Aid Service • Testing Evaluation 
• Repairs to All Makes 

Smith - Dunfield 

Optical Company 
Chesapeake Medical Bldg 

Suite 109 547-2744 




CKherLocatiom 



I33E.MtleOeckRd. 
51^-0033 



19 Plaza Mall 

PrincKs AlV^.Plaza 

34d-2b03 



Wainwright Bldg. 

2^ W.Bute St. 

6^^-6274 



1057 KempsviUc Rd. 
Provifknce Square 

497-3747 



>•% .J*__l 



114 It « 



w^mmmfB 



PM^^AuBusUS^m 



Health and Beauty 



How To Enjoy Your 
Next Brush With 
The Dentist 

By Stuley CUckcy, O.D.S. 

Today's adults grew iq} with the realizatioo that a tr^ 
to the (tentist was either the result or source rf pain. U 
your tooth hurt, you went for a filling or an extraction. 
If you went for a check up you were often told you had 
cavaties that must be filled. We all know what pain 
fillings caused. 

Times and denistry have changed, and with some 
prejudice I will have to say for the better. Technology 
and realization have given dentistry many gifts. The 
late SO's brought the ultra high speed dental drill which 
works at twenty times the speed of its predecessors. 
When it is conbined with a mist of water, the smoke 
and vibratim were eliminated. Then there was the 
motorized and contoured dental chair which provided 
you with a ccnnfortable seat and allowed the ^ntist to 
do his wwk \yhile seated, whicli took the strain from his 
back and your treatment. Along- with the reclining 
chair came high vdume suctioning which kept you from 
having to get up and empty your mouth all the time. 

Later came topical anethetics which, when combined 
with tissue manipulation (i.e. wiggling of your cheek) 
and warm anethesia, enabled you to get the novocaine 
with little to no discomfot.. 

. Today in dentistry, as- in the other areas of medicine, 
Uie attitudes and techniques are changing so rapidly 
that new methods and materials are created almost 
daily. Keeping up has become a constant exercise in 
re-educaticHi. Notcmlyhas the "Science of Dentistry" 
changed but also has the "Art of Etentistry". Today's 
dentist has a large selection of materials and 
techniques that can give you that pleasing smile and 
sound chewing ability in a relaxed and comfcrtable 
atmosphere. Many of today's dentists employ such 
adjunas as ^6trous Oxide Analgesia, Audioanalgesia, 
Pre and Post treatment medications and numerous 
preventive techniques. All of these things are designed 
to make your visit as comfortable as possib le and keep 
the amount of treatment needed to the bare essentials. 
The idea is to catch problems while they are small so 
they can be kept that way. That is why most dentists 
try to see you at regular intervals. 

Other changes in the Art of Dentistry have cone in 
the Dentist himself. Today's dentists realize that you 
are much better educated and are interested in your 
health care. He also realizes the current economic 
situation you are in ~ he is in the same boat - and as a 
result he is willing to explain to you why he has chosen 
a particular treatment approach and the benefits you 
should obtain from that treatment. He is also willing to 
give you alternative plans. All you have to do is ask - 
and please do so! 

Your dentist is the person responsible for the care (tf 
your entire mouth. He or she is the person you know by 
name and come to trust and rely on. Choose him or her 
wisely and you may be surprised to find thiu you can 
enjoy your next brush with the dentist. 



Stanley Chickey' 



Healthy Hair 



ByRofcrCMcKfauey 

President (rf Rogers RN^ssional Hairst^ing 



You have seen it, maybe touched it; you may even 
own it. If you don't own it, you pxctaiAy think pea|4e 
who do are just lucky. Everyone admires healtUy 
lotAmg hair. Haven't you noticed that peofrie with 
healthy hair are generally heatthy from head to toe? 
Hair is the barometer of health. These people eat 
nutritionally balanced foods, excercise, and avoid as 
much stress as possible. 

You can prevent damage to your hair by not over 
drying, either by blow dryer or too much sun on 
unprotected hair. Don't brush or comb hair harshly, as 
this causes a loss of elasticity whidi means split and 
broken hair. Use professional conditioning products 
reccwnmended by your hair stylist. 

Once hair has been damaged it cannot be completely 
repaired. With the use of professicmal salon hair care 
products, we can however, restore much of the hair's 
sheen and manageability. 

Haw do these conditioning products work? Either by 
depositing a thin coating on the outside of each hair 
shaft or by absorbing these conditions into the 
damaged hair shaft. Hydrolized protein is most often 
used for this purpose. Forms of waxes, oils, and 
botanicals are often used to simply coat the hair 
surface. 

Remember, luck has little to do with having ami 
keeping healthy hair. 

Hair And Skin Mad . 

Spacial Summer Cara 

Too much sun, wind and 
air-conditioning can cause a 
variety of summer skin dis- 
orders. Washing with harsh 
soaps is also a contributing 
factor. Many well-known 
brands are not as gentle 
to the skin as you might 
think, dermatologists note. 

For people with sensitive' 
skin problerhs, dermatolo- 
gists frequently recommend 
specially formulated Purpose 
Soap. It is gentle enough 
for daily use; helps replace 
natural moisture removed 
by bathing; leaves no residue 
and is loiig lasting — an 
economy plus in these in- 
flationary times. 

Hair needs extra protec- 
tion, too, during the sum- 
mer months. To {Hrevent 
drying from sun and water, 
try Purpose Shampoo, mild 
enough for daily uae. It 
cleanses thoroughly and 
gently, btipu^ bur main- 
tain shine and manageability. 
It is also effective for scalp 
disorder!, and helps prevent 
dryness, scaUng and crack- 
ing, frequently Mi^>^4at^ 
with daily uae of huth 
shampoos in summer. 




POST MASTECTOMY 
FORUM 

A Special Seminar for The After 
Breast Surgery Woman 

CONDUCTED by 
LoudeRose 

NATIONAL CONSULtANT 
^Mbt &a JLc. 

Spe rfa i Hiing to the needs of the 
post nuHtectomy waau 

9AM -10 AM Pobife Eonun 
10 AM-6 PM Privtte FUtiiigs 




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Va Beach 

INirtiBfceW» 

4l32VaBciHvd 

497^116 


Toes Aug 24 
HamptoD 

awrrt— OMiiMiWi 

CoMssWi Drive 
831^11 


WcdAHg25 
Portsmonth 

HnMqriH 

ItQwHMISt 

393-2573 


11iiinAiis26 
Snffoft 

Holhhiylu 

ttMPraiaaHvri 

934-231] 



ALL ^Mbe^mi 139b OFF 

For Private Fittings please call for an appointmoit 
80M97-3I86 

9UU £^ & Pembroke Wigs 




MutUeAMOnney 
Owner A Advanced Stylist 




Roger AicKinney 
Ovmer A Advanced Stylist 




GENERAL DENTISTRY 



Daily, ETeniogs, & Saturday 
Vi Block from Shore Drive 



ProfessionalHairstyling, Inc. 
isstiU 

Number One in Great Bridge 



2247 Great Neck Road 481-3305- 



482-i900<M' 492-3505 

3l6Batt^ieUBhd, South 
Town ami Country I%iza 
Across/romEar/e'sMarfxt 
and Virginkt National Bank 

ROGERS "Tlimkyou"<HfiNo. n 

FBEE 

AHAM^nASTYLE 

^mt jht fc a hm 4<o<g 



New Hours 

MoH. t^um 9.-00 til6.i» 

Sat. 8.-00 tU 4.-00 



tecUtaf M#rtei»ipoii 



i S 3 









Ph. Mo, 



Benefits of Waterbeds 

and Hot Tubs 
t 

By Joel K. Pfedenoa 

peneral Mgr. Leisure Away, lid. 

One of the most common reasons people buy 
waterbeds is for chrcmic backaches. Doctors all over 
the U. S. have prescribed waterbeds fw their patients. 
When fyij» ddwli Bi^ ;ppa3rtn#Bces are sublet to 
pressure on a firm surf^. ^n4)^n a gatient floats m a 
watcrbed, pressure is sifcstaarK^Olt reduced. Orcula- 
tipn is increased over the conventional mattress 
because (tf the even distributioB of weight. '%ith this 
better circulation, patients that have ahdergcaie 
sargery have a tendency to heal more rapidly and 
endure a great degree less pain acccaniMttMisd with! 
being bed nddeo. Bed sores are unhesfrtf SI on 
waterbeds for. tl3M!,si^un¥ reason^ 

{Many people. who suffer fr«m the l^m|«<ns of 
arthritis and rteunu^a lifve found dmt the he^ of a 
waterbed helps to soothe and relieve aches and pain. 
Ihe contr^Aed warm sur£Eu^ is also viery benefit in 
relieving tension and soothing sore mosdes. 

Primarily we sell to cmtomers who comidak of 
backadies, however we have sold to people who suffer 
tarn the pain of cancer, insamnla, jHvgnant women 
who desire the give of a waterbed, bum patients who 
need tlw better drculatian and to peofde who desire the 
restiiill relaxing sleep only a waterbed can provide. 

Hot tubs are alsoagreat health benefit in this day of 
canUac arrest. On the average 7 out of 10 hosi»tal beds 
in the U. S. are fided with people due to stress. Hie 
warm, buMiag seasittiap aid gen& massagiiig action 
of the hot tub provide* tlw ciqxiitumty fior aa intUvidua] 
to wind down and relax. Many docton are advising 
their patieau to invert hi hot tubs for this very same 
reason, ft seena that in this worid of iSut paced living 
wad workfais that the best pieventive medicine is to 
relax and take tine to snwB the idsM co the way. 



Angost 18, 1982 FH^e 15 



dttit^ 

TO BQOMUDA 

FROM NOillOLK 

AND SAVE 



$ 







I 



Now you can 
cruise K> Ber- 
muda on tfie 
"Tm Ship" tss 
MmMCtiSimdi 
safveSZOOoffthe 
cost of your oMa 

Mrtualyeve^ 
thfe^'shKhided 
foronekMvpiicti 
Ml meab JHid 
snadcs (eight of 

Don't nrfss out on dils "Fun 
leaning from Noff(A lo 



themeKhddyO^ 
dazzing cibMct 
shoMS- dance 
bamtaw-alUi 



end dozens of 
^lipboMdec- 
imm.ymcm 
iiknne 
brjiiitle 

yourtaa 
sup* 



SfPTEMKI 1 1, 7 DAYS raoMONiv^iil90 



on SepCemocr 18 Iron only *34S 




IMlCMp* 



SMOkfwciMiMtfM- 



FOR INFORMATION A RESERVATIONS 
CALL A TRAVEL AGENT OR 

^<yufee JntotiaBonal 

--•ftt^ __ (804) 461-5S51 - 



SCANDINAVIAN 



^ 



SCAHDIR^^/lAH 

Health Club 



HEALTH CLUB 



Virginia Beach, Va. 



SPECIAL 




GIVEAWAY! 

468-3605 

At Scandinavian Health Club we are 
is'oud to announce our special 

Summer Giveaway. 

In conjunction with this Special 

we will be giving away 

THREE- YEAR 

CHARTER 
MEMBERSHIPS 

(winners will be selectc^d at random 
and notified.) 

TheChiblsoiMB: 





Mea.9:38-9H» 



1^ MAJOR 
CREOTT 
, CARDS 
ACCEPTED 



'AmsIOHW-SKM 

Thwi.ltKN»-»HIO e__. ^_ 

Sel.f.-«^4.^ ^^'*^ 

ysei-une 

• CMi^Nc Eimdse FacUHlM 

• Modcn Eipipnnt iediitt^ IWvcml * nw WdgUs 

• ftolessioBal bslnKfloe 
•WUr^wri •SewM 
•NeMtftmriPn^TMBs 
•ttowcfi •Loctafs 

• Faeces for Mee A Women 

• Saalae Rooms 
•IPFAAfflMatc 

t\^ t-_ Th«e three-year charter memberships are valued ai '450 each. 

f^^'Wj^OViiuiing memberships are subject to maintenance dues of "43 



n. 





C;ti*C. 'it»|- U4r**** «i*'/r ##. 



4.i£&4#^ri 






Page 16 Aagast 18, 1982 






XV Wl^ 



MEDICAL 
CENTER 




COMMUNITY ORIENTED 
MULTI-SPECIALTY HEALTH FACILI . 
GREEN RUN FAMILY PRACTICE CE>JT - 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK INCLUDING EVENING HOURS AND WAT M 

427-9194 

INFORMATION & ADMINISTRATION 

RADIOLOGY pC-ray&Ultrasound>. ^^^ f IPl 

VBGH-LABORATORY 468-ffli^ 

SPECIALTY OFFIGfiS BY /^POIN ^^^ 

ORTHOPEDIC & HAND SURGERY 
UROLOGY 
ULMON AR Y & INIIRN AL MPnTf 
LOGY(^ 






ftAL-VASCULARA 
H-CARDIOLOGY_._^ MBMm 




■^WP^Bin^WW**"*" 



t^^^^^^^mmm^^ 



•w'^'^^mm 



^wpw»»^^^—WiWPpi^'W 



sppF^^npiPinii 






TheVirgiiiia BeacJi Sun 




Direct Election Perking 

Give Mayor 
More Power 

By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Joe Canada, unsure whether the questicm will be 
placed in the fcM-m of a referendum ot a public hearing, 
says his recent call for the public election of this city's 
mayor is perking. 

"It's still brewing," the State Senator from Virginia 
Beach told The Sun. "We're waiting for Qty Council 
endorsement." - 

Canada said that a change in the city's charter would 
have to occur before the most populated city in 
Virginia, Virginia Beach, could switch from its present 
Council/Manager form of government to a Strong 
Mayor system, underwhich the public would directly 
elect the mayor. Only the Virginia General Assembly 
can change the city's charter, irrespective of Council's 
apprwal ot disapproval. A referendum, or a hearing 
would be held, Canada said, before the Assembly 
would consider a change. Qty Qnincil, as of now, has 
not formally reacted to Canada's proposal. 

Last year Qty Council requested such a change in its 
annual legislative wish-list it sends to Richmond. No 
action was taken. This year Canada has renewed 
interest in the idea, forming a citizens' committee and 
purchasing promoticHial t-shirts to push the pr(q>osal. 
Canada also seeks to stamp out local mayoral elections 
which always do not transpire with the utmost 
diplomacy. 

"I think it's jusf a bag of worms," said Shelby 
BaldersOTi, manager and vice president of Decker 
Studios, Virginia Beach, referring to the last two 
Virginia Beach mayoral electicms. In 1980, Councilman 
J. Henry McCoy, Jr., was finally elected mayor after 
much debate, several closed-doOT sessions, and several 
ballots. This year's election, in which Louis Jones was 
elected, was blemished by unsportsmanlike conduct 
** pnd threats from one of the losing candidates for the 
mayfi|-'s seat. 

BaldersOTi, wife of Virginia Beach businessman and 
civic leader StaffOTd Balderson, serves on Canada's 
special committee. She said the seven-member 
committee has not met, but feels certain that tlie status 
of Virginia Ba«**s maycar's crfficc needs to be elevated^. 

"We tt«#t»iwrr« m4li"IWB^"W1fie'bfftce,"'ifie 
said. "It should have more dcut than it does." 

A Gait For Power 

Sccxt Sterling, an oceanfront innkeeper, is also cm 
Canada's committee. Bs not oUy thinks that Virginia 
Beach would be best served by the direct election of the 
mayOT, but that the mayw's executive powers should 
be expanded in event of "emergencies." 

"It should be within the mayra-'s providence to 
declare emergencies," Sterlmg asserts. "The changes 
coming in the next few years fran the federal 
governiiient, in regard to how much funding we receive 
locally, will be radical. The needs of the city will go up 
ai^ down. The power of the mayOT and local 
gcwernme^t needs to be flexible." 

^efiktg said that as federal budget cuts affect 
Virginia Beach, there are COTistituencies within the city 
which may suffer. Specifically, Sterling's concern is 
th^t there are people in this city on welfare who may go 
hungry as the federal government cuts funding at the 
local level. 

"I'm talking about survival, food," Sterling said. 
"Everybody now is receiving their welfare checks, but 
they're not going to very shOTtly. The slack is gcang to 
have to be taken in locally, and the funding will have to 
cone from local funds. I know what's gdng oti. I 
emplc^ SOTne of these people myself," 

Sterling suggests the mayOT be empowered, in 
emergency situatiois, to ledlocate ftmds ftom the 
Department of Fk^ce, for example, to the Department 
of Social Services, tosupptementany cuts in food stamp 
funding. But Sterling, however, is a UtUe unclear about 
the present powers of the nuiyOT and city manager 
under the city's present form (rf government. 

What Sterling is referring to is the reallocatiOTi of city 
funds after the city's bucket has already been set and 
approved. Sterling coitends that after the budget is 
approved, it is stnick in stOTie, and cannot be changed. 
But that is not the case, accOTding to Wah Kramer, 
budget coOTdinatOT, Virginia Beach Department of . 
Finana. . 

If a city department needs additicnal funds, Kramer 
explained, Qty QwiicU can approve the request, 
provided the revenues are recmiped by increasing taxes 
in the future, reailoc»tlons, ot by fiind balancing, 
whereby leftover unapprc^ated fuiuis are allocated. 

^ik "The budget can be altered after it has been 
adopted." Kramer said. "If the reallocatiOTi is fOT mOTe 
tten $10,000, it must have Coumiil's approval. If the 
amount is lesb than tiiat, the city OMnager hm the 
power to spend without asking." 

Mite Barrett, assistant to the dty manager, said the 
dty manager usuaUy wwks do^ ttese lines in very 
close wmart with t^ Qty Ooundl, but notes ttat "in 
faster situations the dty manager can call for 
eiMrgency fiiiuUng, aiKi dedw« toad emergences." 
This po«^r, SterUn^ feels, stouW be the mayOT's if the 
city i^ofrts a sttsng mi^ fwin c€ govermiKnt. But 
fturett disagrees. 

"Ewn in a ttrtag^^^r system of government, 
the ma^w does not wwa^ have emergency powers", 
Barrett said. 

Ckn^ said Iw thinta *^gima B^Mh't nuiyOT wiU be 
elected % p<^«tar wu within mo^ three yean. 




A Royal 
Reception 



VlriMi BtMli tad OivtlMfSdmrtl Gucb, ta wU««. #aiii liMll^MBBciM* Mw«r laA 
JoM* a> HDi EaeaOmKj Dr. a«Bt MdMunad Ai-FaMl, VUmmmm Jm, mi aMMii«t, an 
cKorMI ^vOi^ tt* crawA. F^ amic MormalkNi see editorial, pagt 2; ud piMw m iK«n < 



r in inrirfflr 



Spankings 

Almost 

Outlawed 




^Ur 



a . 



/u 



y 



P, 



v.y- 



School Board Members 

* 

A ttack Citizen Apathy 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Editor 

Parents in Virginia 
Beach will now be able to 
exempt their children 
from corporal punishment 
in the school system, a 
result of action taken last 
week by the city's school 
board. 

On a motion made by 
board member Duncan S. 
Wallace, a psychiatrist, 
the board voted by a five- 
to-one margin to adopt 
several changes in the 13 
year-old policy. Four 
members of the 11 -person 
board were absent from 
the meeting, and Dr. Roy 
A. Woods, the board's 
chairman, does not vote 
unless there is a tie. 

Along with the exem- 
ption provision, several 
other alterations were 
made to School Board 
policy 5134.3. Corporal 
punishment will now only 
be administered to studen- 
ts by administrators of the 
same sex. Reason for 
carrying out the punish- 
'ment will be given to 
students beforehand, and 



his peers for voting as they 
did. *'The best tlqng, of 
course, would he to 
abolish corporal punish- 
ment because it is just not 
effective," Wallace said. 
"But, I understand there 
is some question whether 
we could abolish it since 
the state legislature has 
said corporal punishment 
is permissable in the 
school system. 

"The next best thing is 
to put as many restrictions 
on corporal pimishmrat as 
is possible, and that is 
what we have done," said 
Wallace, who represents 
the Bayside borough. 

Wallace bestowed credit 
for the policy changes 
upon fellow board mem- 
ber John A. Fahey, who 
had requested discussion 
on the matter. Following 
his attendance at the 42nd 
Annual Conference of the 
National School Board 
Association in Atlanta last 
April, Fahey requested an 
evaluation of the policy by 
the board. In a letter to 
School Superintendent E. 
E. Brickell, Fahey termed 



They are in charge of $113,861 .812 and the welfare of 
mOTe than 55,000 Wginia Beach children. Yet, when 
members of the Virginia Beach Schocri Board met last 
week at Providence Schod in Kempsville, nOT OTie 
citizen was in attendance. 

..aaw.4^m^tt iiia jito. invrtyFd iflisntrff . nn . 

redsOTis m the seemihf Ipau^ wspMqwd by Virginia 
Beach's 262,000 residents regarding the educational 
process, hi canvassing members of the 11-person 
board, otic. fact comes shining through; mOTe citizen 
input would be appreciated. 

"They shOTild certainly come to the meetings, but I 
doi't know why they don't," said I>r. Roy A. Woods, 
chairman of the board. "Qtizens ought to be interested 
because the school board pOTtion of the budget makes 
up mOTe than 40 perceirt of the city's cwerall budget. I 
would most definitely like to hear ftom the pe(q>le 
mOTe." 

Dr. Duncan S. Wallace, who represents the Bayside 
bOTOUgh, agreed. "I would like to see mOTe involve- 
ment from the citizens of Virginia Beach," he said. "I 
hardly ever get any calls hem the cOTiununity, but I am 
available if they would like to discuss school-related 
matters." 

Wallace pinned the blame fOT lack of citizen 
attendance at meetings on two factOTs. "Ihe municii^ 
center is in a very inaccessable location," he said of the 
usual meeting place. "Also, the timing of the meetings 
probably plays a rde in that most pcctpk are prt^ably 
wOTking in the afternoon. 

"I imi^ine, though, that apathy is the chief cause," 
Wallace continued. "People today sense they have less 
cOTitrd over their Uves than ever, and they fe^ that 
their voice would never be heard. About the OTily thing 



the pec^le seem to get excited about is their taxes." 

Leland M. Hood of the Pungo bOTough agrees with 
the apathy assessment. "I think there is a feeling out 
there that nobody should wOTry about the schods 
beca|ise the school board will take care of all the 
jBpi(^vos"< )» sttd. "Wapkt JKe MoUiMHi w-wt any 
small excuse fOT why they don't do wl^t they ought to 
do. It seems to me that if an issue was important 
enough to somebody, he'd make it to that meeting no 
matter where it was held." 

Qeeds Elementary, with an enroUment of around 
300, is the only public schod in Hood's txrough. 
Because of that, he receives mOTe phone calls than do 
the other board members, he said. "Out here in Pungo, 
peqjie see they have one city ccMincilman and me 
schod board member, and I dm't want to say they are 
back woods, but they feel a greater closeness to their 
representatives. They doi't hesitate to call me at my 
home, although I would always like to get a few mOTe 
calls. After all, I try to do the best fOT the children and 
satisfy the parents." 

Norris W. Shirley, who represents the Princess Anne 
bOTOUgh, said there is nOT a problem with citizen 
invdvement. "I feel like they do their part," he said. 
"When there is an issue up which is of vast general 
interest, there is a large attendance at the meetings." 
This is not to say Shirley is against more community 
participation. "We are always interested m hearing 
from the citizens," he added. 

Jdm A. Fahey from the Lynnhaven bOTOUgh is 

COTifused by the lack of citizen participatlOTi. "If you 

todc a survey, you'd probably fin^Nhat education is 

very near and dear to the people's hearts," he said. 

See School, Pagb 3 



*'The fact that the school 
board will now be reviewing 
each ^nd every case will rnakg 
the people who administer 
corporal punishment thing 
twice before doing so , . .In ef- 
fect, we have nearly done away 
with corporal punishment. " - 
School Board Member Duncan 
Wallace 



the children must first be 
given an opportunity to 
respond. Finally, the 
school board will be kept 
abreast of all instances of 
corporal punishment with 
a report to be given at 
each monthly board 
meeting. 

Calling the changes "a 
step in the right direc- 
tion", Wallace applauded 



corporal punishment 
"medieval," and he in- 
dicated he would vote for 
its removal given the op- 
portunity. 

"I didn't ask for 
elimination of corporal 
punishment because I 
don't think there is sen- 
timent on the board to 
move that way," said 
See Corporal, Page 3 




Tite Cavalier 



Thi Ami kMtataMI •! the VlrtfiriB I 
Hrtpwi abova ii a moitk ^ tte ( 
ital9t7. 






A > 



2 Virginja Beach Sun, August 25, 1992 

Syn Commentary 



Editorials 



^ 



Garcia And The City 



It began as a party for about SO people. 
Eddie Garcia didn't know until the Mon< 
day before that His Excellency Dr. Sheik 
Muhammad Al-Fassi, and entourage, 
would arrive in Virginia Beach that 
Friday. Immediately, Garcia set the 
wheels in motion, to host a Royal Arabian 
Family with only a few days advance 
notice. 

Seafood, lamb and beef were included 
in the menu. There were several open 
bars. Jazz was performed by Connie 
Parker. Many of Virginia Beach's 
municipal and business leaders were at 
the hot August afternoon party. About 
350 to 400 guest attended. 

This was not the first deluxe affair ever 
held at the Garcia's. There have been 
many, some numbering 500 people in at- 
tendance. This one cost Garcia over 
$15,000. But who can put a price tag on 
goodwill, international relations, and the 
potential economic growth such foreign 
investments will mean to Virginia Beach 
as we look past the year 2,000. 

Garcia is quick to note that His Ex- 
cellency's visit to Virginia Beach was Uke 



a Saudi State visit. Al-Fassi represented 
the interests of his country, economically 
as well as diplomatically. He donated 
$30,000 to the city, out of the goodness of 
his heart; and promises to invest here in 
the future, hoping to help stabilize his 
country's sometimes unpredictable 
economy. 

Garcia has been invited to visit the 
sheik in Florida in a couple of weeks, and 
plans to invite His Excellency back to 
Virginia Beach in December for the 
"topping off" or putting the roof on, the 
Pavilion Towers, due to open in June. 

Garcia and the City of Virginia Beach 
have sometimes been adversaries. He is a 
developer and has sometimes come into 
conflict with city, dvic, and military of- 
ficials. But, it seems obvious that now the 
City and Garcia are working together to 
actively, and aggressively, help develop 
land areas still in their infantile stages, 
such as the Oceana Industrial Park. 
Such investments and development will 
add to Virginia Beach's economic well 
being. - G.D.G. 



School Board Attendance 



The Municipal Center's school ad- 
ministration building is the place. Every 
third Thursday at 2 p.m^the time. The 
monthly meeting of ^the Virginia Beach 
School Board is the occasion. > 

At stake is policy-making for the city's 
55,000 students. Last week when the 
board convened, even though topic for 
discussion was the important issue of cor- 
poral punishment, nobody attended. 

There could be several reasons why 
Virginia Beach residents do not take a 
more active role in school board activities. 
The first and most logical possibility 
could be that the board is doing so fine a 
job, that the people do not feel obligated 
to speak out. Secondly, and more com- 
pelling, is the fact that board meetings are 
very inconvienient. 

The municipal center], located in the old 
court house section of Princess Anne 
Country, is not accessible to the majority 
of Virginia Beach's 262,000 residents. 
Secondly, the meetings are generally held 



at a time in which the majority of the 
community is at wOTk. 

Compounding the problem is the fact 
that school board meetings are not always 
held when and where they are supposed to 
be. Sometimes, the board ventures to 
various schools around the city. Last 
week, for example, the meeting was held 
at Providence Elementary in the Kem- 
psville borough. Also, on a rather 
irregular basis, the board occasionally 
convenes at 7:30 p.m. These schedule 
chang^are notj adequately publicized. 

Schookboani members say they would 
like more participation from the com- 
munity. One way of showing an active in- 
terest in educational matters would be for 
our citizens to attend meetings more 
regularly. With close to $114 million 
dollars at stake, representing 43.07 per- 
cent' of the city's operating budget, 
Virginia Beach residents can ill afford not 
to stand up and be counted. - M.M.G. 



Forward And The Chamber 




Virginia Beach Forward says it is a 
"compliment" and a "political action 
arm" of the Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce. Chamber and Forward of- 
ficials have met, and are jointly concerned 
about the city's economic base. But that's 
about as far as the relationship goes. 

Chamber President Bob Berry said that 

ile Forward may benefit the city's 

siness community, the newly formed 
group is in no way connected with Cham- 
ber. 

"They (Forward) are very sincere in 
their efforts," Berry told The Sun. "The 
fact remains to be seen, however, how 
much impact they will have. But, the 
more people involved with the community 
the better. 

"We are completely independent," 
Berry contiiiued. "They arc not in any 
way an arm of the Chamber. They may 
be a compliment to the business com- 
munity, but other than that I find no 
mutual relation betw^n the Chamber and 
Forward. We have met with some of the 
their leaders and discussed some issues. 
We would certainly want to maintain con- 
tort with them." 

When Forward President Bruce TlK>m- 
P^m suggests a relationship betw^n his 
group and Chambo*, it must 1^ in theory, 
because none of his businesses are m»D- 
bers of theChamber, a Chamber 
spokesman said. 

Hie Chamber is ap<riitical. It do^ not 
nominate, push, nor endorse political 
(^ndiat^. Its purpc^ to Gf:pQm Urn 
dti^nry to aU the candidate and thdr 
^nfm% on looU mvm. Fcwward, on the 
(Mlm^ hanl, pkun to we^eoX awl piMe 
pea^ in otrvx. 



Forward critics charge that its many of 
members are young, brash, and business 
high rollers with little previous experience 
in civic or municipal affairs. 

"They are only out to push can- 
didates," a Chamber official said. 

If this is the case, it's not necessarily 
bad. 

Forward may have rubbed some people 
the wrong way, and some members may 
have vest^ interests. But their long term 
intentions and current perception of city 
business are not entirely off the mark. 

If tourism do^n't fiuorish, and new 
businesses and industries don't continue 
to locate in Virginia Bea* h, that means 
less revenue for the city coffers, and 
decreased public services. 

Less monQT translate into fewer new 
schools, road improvements, brautifioi- 
tion projects, parks and other amenitia 
which contribute to Virginia Beach's high 
quality of life. Or, anotho' way to kMp 
the qtiality of livii^ high is to raise tsxc&. 

Virginia Beach do« enjoy the lowest 
tax rates in the state, and a comfortable 
lif^tyle. This is « te&vXt of a flourishing 
economic base, fueled by the military, 
agriculture, industry, tourism, and 
wlK>l^ale and retail sales. Busi^^ has 
nu^ Virginia B«tfh what it is today, and 
will (mint its in^UK for the future. 

If Forward tti»3s carefully, it will carve 
itself a i^he in the Vii^nla B«u;h com- 
munity. If it losc^ pcnpc^yct and does 
not achieve a balance between 
busin^m^ ani c^^mevadonists, it will 
mikf mnt as aaotto we^ io a &sm- 
mmktf whi^ Mek to wmS^, not di^^. - 



Letters To The Editor 



Delegate Concerned Over Pornography 



Editor: 

I am most concerned about the current debate about 
obscene and pornograi^c material in Virginia. In 
particuUv, I refer to the recent setbacks in pom-related 
court cases. 

Make no mistake~the pom industry attacks the 
fiibric of our society, hfot only does pwn appe* 1 to, the 
base part of human nature and prcxnote vident, deviant 
behavior, it also pours billions of ddlars into the coffers 
of organized crime. Thus, the community is justified 
when it demands that the pom shops be closed. 

The recent spate <rf lost cases results from the 
importotion into Vtfginia of high-priced, high-powered 
legal talent. Better case preparation and presentation 
will bring back our earlier high conviction rate-espec- 
ially in "hard pom" cases. (With the recent U.S. 
Supreme Court ruling, perhaps our attorneys may wage 



an all-out war on the dealers of smut.) 

Nevertheless, more convictions won't J«lP J^J«" 
meaningful penalties, to 1982. 1«t''«»"«i«^"^ 
Virginia CJeneral Assembly to mcrease the m«^wj 
fine from $I.(X»To $10,000 for ^^^^V^^'^ ^ 
foiled. I am hopeful that the nsmg pubhc outcry wiU 
Sve it a beSeT chance in 1983. when I jJitend 
feintroducing it. State legislators read their inaU very 
carefuUy indeed. TTie likelihood of P««^^ « J^ 
pom bill in the General Assembly m 1983 wiU be 
greatly improved if aU Virgimans who want this to 
happen write a short personal note demandmg stronger 
penalties to their delegate and senator. 

Owendalyn F.Cody, 

House of Delegates 

FairfinxCoiyity 



NEA Says 



Teaching Not Like It Used To Be 



The average ^nerican 
public school teacher 
today is older, better 
educated, less well paid, 
and is less likely to choose 
teaching as a career if 
given a second chance 
than was the case in 1976. 

According to a nation- 
wide survey by the 
National Education 
Association (NEA), more 
than one in three teachers 
said they "certainly" or 
"probably" would not 
become teachers again if 
they were given the choice. 

Other Hndings of the 
survey include: 



• The average age of 
public school teachers was 
39 in 1981. up from 36 in 
1976. 

• Teachers surveyed in 
1981 had spent more time 
in coUege than those sur- 
veyed in earlier years. 
Nearly half the teachers 
surveyed in 1981 had 
graduate degrees, more 
than double the number 
that had them in 1%1 and 
an increase of 12 percent 
from 1976. 

• Teacher salaries are 
not keeping up with in- 
flation. In 1980-81, those 
surveyed had a mean 
salary of $17,209. an in- 



crease of 43.3 percent 
from the $12,005 eara^ 
during the 1975-76 school 
year. But that increase 
was 14.1 percent smaUer 
than the rise in the rate of 
inflation during the same 
period. 

The report, titled "The 
Status of the Ameridm 
Public School Teacher. 
1980-81" is the sixth ill' a 
series of portraits of the 
public school teacher that 
the NEA has made evei^ 
five years since 1 956. 

Donna G. Ponti hasi^ 
been appdnted as Execu- . 
tive CoOTdinatOT of the 



Vu-ginia Beach Clean 
Community Commission. 
Ifcr primary area of res- 
poisibility is to plan and 
implement a litter manag- 
ement pxQ%x9sti for the 
Gty of Virginia Beach. 

Ponti has an A. S. 
Degree from State Univer- 
sity of New York and a B. 
S. Degree from Longwood 
College. She was previo- 
usly the executive assis- 
tant to the president of 
WHRO TV/FM radio and 
had been a community 
information specialist 
with the Virginia Be»:h 
Community Development 
Office. 



I 

a 
'Eb 



iicDg-<acn--ijn . i»iiitrHihtil VfwAm»tAmv* ■- 
13ft Rbaebidiitltoad, Virginl•,Bcac)^ ya.,233S2 
Phone (804) 486-3430 



Hancs^criy 
Pnblisher 

Within Tidewater Area 

One Year -*9.00 

Two Yean -'12.00 



GregGoldfarb 
Editor 

All (Mher Areas 

One Year ■•11.00 

Two Years - •17.00 



Second ClaaB PostaBe Is PaM at Lynnhaven ^tkm 
in Virginia Beach, Virginia 



-wi-^T-rrTT' 






Letters Welcome 

The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and 
encourages letters to the editor. They 
should be typed, double spaced and in- 
chide the writers name, address and 
phone number. Mail letters to The 
Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont 
Road, Virginia Beach, V A, 25452. 



Write Your Lawmakers 



At the state level, Virgniia Beach is represented 
by four Senators and four Del^ates. When the 
Qei^'al Assembly is in session, address members 
at: 

Gowral Assembly Building 

910 Capital Street 

Richmond. Virginia 23219 

Slate Senate: 

District 5. 6. 7: 

Peter K.Babalas(D) 

210 Atlantic N^onal Bank Building 

415 Saint Paul's Boulevard 

NorfoUc. Virginia 23510 

Phone:(804)622-3100 

Evelyn M. Haley (D) 

1B35 Venules Avenue 

NorfollL. Virginia 23509 

Phone:(804)627-1546 

Stanley C.Walktf(D) 

P.O. Box 12885 

Norfolk, Virgfana 23502 

Plwne: (804) 853-9280 



OistrktS: 



A. jsq}h Canada, Jr. (R) 

S08S.ttnineck^Md 

Vvgi^ Beich, Virginia 23454 

Phone:(804)422-8833 



I^r^l4: 



W^inT. Parker a>) 

^MCecteiUMd 
ho^eakc, ^^gfaiia ^320 
nme: (804) 547-1600 



W^HB %. 9nMs) O'^iei (R) 

llifltiilnftfjail 
Vii^Ba^^^^ 23431 
ii^lQ.^-6021 



MMi^wceW 
H» tMtt i Roi i i ,Wtei 
IHtiiinwrh.l^^^ a^ I 

nemmmm-im 



Glenn B. McOanan (D) 

425 S.Witchduck Road 

Virgbiia Beaeh, Vtoginia 23462 

Phone:(804)497-9451 

Owm B. Pickett (D) 

e.O. Box 2127 

Vu-guda^each. Virginia 23452 

Phone: (804) 340^11 

J.W. (Billy) O'Brien (D) 

3300<^ean Siore Avoiue 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23451 

Phone: (804)481-5964 



Atthe fedoralleyd. Vli^nia Beach Is ^)resai- 
ted by two Sea^«s and tii^Ompasmai: 

U.S. Senate: 

"Hie HMC^Me J<^ W. Warner (R) 

Room €239 DiAsoi &illdlng 

Wadilngton.D.C. 20510 

Phone:(202)224-2023 

Ttw HfNMjnbte Harry F. Byrd (I) 

41? RuneU OtRfst BalMing 

WariAigtim«D.C. a(»10 

Phone: 002) 2244024 

Tte n«AtoiMe O. W^tam WhkAum (R) 

2427 Ri^bum Hmue Oflk% AiUding 

WadBi«taB,p.C. 2(^15 

PlMNie:(2aOS5-«l5 

Ate>: PanbrokeOn«,Mt«ftl 

VirgMaBei^ Vi«^w 23^2 

tl^ ItMWri^ R^>@t W. MnM. Jr. (R) 
22X Ri^^ HoiM ^^i ftdtfng 

w^^^D.c. awis 

FlMm:(KM)^^ 

PMt^M^vi^hi nws 

1^^:^^4414797 



( 









Virgima Beach Skui, AMgast 25, IS^ 3 



■ 5 



New Business Group Seeking Identity 



What Is Forward Really All About? 



ByOregGoldfarb 
Sun Editor 

Virginia Beach Forward President Bruce 
HiomiMon is a Virginia Be«;h native. His paren- 
ts, Mr. and Mrs. Williun M. Thompson, still 
rnide here. 

Thompson is a First Colonial High School 
graduate, and has worked in various ce4>adties 
since the age of 14. He attended VPI, Blacksburg, 
Va., one year, studying business and operating a 
^une center and a submarine sandwich^op. 

"From the time I was 18 I've done promotional 
work for all kinds of people," he commented. 

Thomi»on's business ventures have reached 
Vu-ginia Beach, Norfolk, Portsmouth and Ham- 
pton; restaurants, con^rts, and retail sales. 
Currehlly, he is a partner in at least four 1ck»I~ 
businesses: The Ski Center, with locations in Nor- 
folk, Hampton and Virginia Beach; Omni Charter 
Buses Inc., Virginia Beach; Great Atlantic and 
Travel Corp., Virginia Beach; and Cruise Inter- 
national, Norfolk. 

At 30 years of age, married with children, 
Thompson feels comfortable in business circles. 



"People want everything 
they can get for nothing. 
They don 't understand that 
the city needs revenues to 
build them their nice, 
beautiful parks; and also 
keep their tax rates low. 
The people we're electing to 
office don 't understand this 
either. * ' - Thompson 



which has led him to become comfortable with 
politicians. He campaigned for Governor Charles 
Robb, and Robb, in turn, attended a Forward 
Kick Off rally last January atTandom's. 

"During the last three^op. I've been involyed 
with dififtfWBt ^lllteiB"fird»T'^ hi -^aid. 
"Everything from campaigning to fund raising." 

Thompson's involvement with local, state and 
federal officials, he says, will. beneflt the Virginia 
Beach business conununity, which will in turn 
benefit every resident in the city. 

"I've seen the diffeience between good gover- 
nmmt and bad, wrecklns government," Thom- 
pson said. "I realize that one individual can make 
a difference." 



Therein lies the reason Thompson is president 
of Forward. 

He, and his compliment of about 97 Virginia 
Beach business people, rg>resenting about 85 
Vh-ginia Beach businessees, have decided to give 
the community an education. Forward contends 
the avo-age Virginia Beach resident has no idea 
how dty government works. The citizens and 
some council people don't imderstand, they say, 
that low tax rates and a high quality of living is 
dependent on a strong, healthy, thriving business 
ccHnmunity. 

"People want everything they can get, for 
notUng," he said. "They don't understand that 
the city needs revenues to build them their nice, 
beautifulparks; and also keep their tax rates lowr^ 
The people we're electing to office don't under- 
stand this either." 

In addition to trying to get selected people ela- 
ted to public office. Forward, also plans to appeal 
directly to lawmakers already in office, regarding 
the economic well being of Virginia Beach's 
business and residential community. 

"You have to have access so you can converse 
with the governing bodies/' Thompson said. 
"You need to develop a closeness and an identity 
with them before they're in office. Everybody 
wants access to them after they're in office. " 

Thompson feels that the local residents are not 
aware of Virginia Beach's potential, in terms of 
popularity and growth. 

"That is what Forward is all about," he says. 
"Letting Virginia Beach residents know of the 
city's full potential, and how to live up to it. It's 
overwhelming." 

The Virginia Beach business community, in 
general, is not interested in local politics, Thom- 
pson said. The residential community is very ac- 
tice, but counterproductive to a positive local 
economy. City Council members, are caught in- 
between. 

"As a small businessmen, you tend to get in- 
volved mostly with your own business," Thom- 
pson said. "It takes up all your time, and you 
become subject to a lot of things government in- 
flicts on you. 

"We want to create an awarene^TOnpng the 
jbusinMt^ ceminunity tc get tetolVRl anilHake^'pari 
b the local gd^rfir prdtJssf«'lto^«? 
tinned. "If we don't get involved, we're not going 
to have a business environment conducive to being 
successful. For mample, if we don't make it 
easier and more comfortable for our tourists who 
visit the city, the day might come when there 
won't be people on the streets to sell to." 

Thompson blames City Council for the meal 
taxes, parking regtUations, and other restrictions 
which are in effect. 




Thompson says Forward will undertake a 
"mammoth civic project" yearly to benefit the 
city, such as the $100,000 fund drive Forward has 
launched to help fund to the forthcoming $6 
million Virginia Museum of Marine Science, to be 
located near Croatan. A three day "Beach 
Music" weekend is planned for Sept. 24 to 26. 
with dances and contests being held at various 
Virginia Beach clubs. "This is going to be a suc- 
cessful event," he adumbrates, "and will have a 
positive impact on Virginia Beach. ' ' 



Thompson, who is a member of the Virginia 
Travel Commission board of directors, says he has 
no persQnal political aspirations. Between his 
political involvements. Jjiisinesses and family, he^ 
has no time. 



Forward President Bruce Thompson 



"You have to seek out and find qualified people 
to serve on Council," he said, "The problem is 
that we're not putting people in office who can 
carry the ball." 

When Forward formed last January, 75 to 80 
people were expected at its kickoff and about 250 
attended. The organization has a state charter and 
is incorporated. It started off on a bad foot, 
however when it circulated a newsletter describing 
its members as "sharp young businessmen" and 
local civic groups and garden clubs as "do- 
' gooders." 

Thompson said the choice of words in For- 
ward's first public publication was poor. 

"Everything was just hitting us at once," he 
said. "We never meant anythii^ as a throw 
against the community. We called ourselves 
'sharp' to get the business community aware that 

it was lackadaisical and too complacent. 

pS . ''The . civic, «r«wizatipn§.';.*^Son^¥«d. "are 
*^ < probably the pulse of the community. They are 
very important and vital to this city. We want to 
work with the civic leagues and get a balance. 

"The most sought after dollar in this city is the 
"> tourist dollar. We don't pay for their education 
and they come in the city and spend money. The 
city must grow and adjust and accommodate 
them, but the local residents don't want the 
growth to impact them. They don't see the city as 
big business." 



"I don't feel I'm quaUfied," he said. 

His term as president of Forward, an 
organization which he describes as "a com- 
pliment," and as a "political action arm of the 
Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce," will end 
this January. He may seek another term. 



"Everything was hitting 
us at once, , itve never 
meant anything as a throw 
against the community. We 
called ourselves 'sharp' 
businessmen to get the 
business community aware 
that it was lackadaisical and 
too complacent, " - Thom- 
pson 



Thompson realizes that Forward is young, and 
with itsyputbhi^ Gf»ieerrars>, ^. .^x .») ■>\-ri^r ^j.x^: 



"Yes we're young, and that scares me," he said. 
"Making mistakes scares me, like stepping off on 
the wrong foot. But we want it to be known by the 
community that we can't fimction without their 
support. We want to be viewed as sound 
businessmen who recognize the needs of this city, 
and can see further down the road and past one 
given neighborhood." 



1 



J 



V. 



Corporal Punishment Vote Applauded 



fifsf Savings and Loan 

Association 

of Suffolk 

is Dedicated to Being 

Good Local 

Citizens 

We're Now Part of 
Citaens Savings & Loan 

We're one of tfw largest and strongest federally-chartered 

savin^^id loan as^x:iations in Virginia. Citizens' assets 

now totrt nearly $340,000,000. At July 31. its net worth was 

three times the required mininrium. With offices in Suffolk, Franklin, 

Virginia Beach ar^ PcKtsmouth. plus 1 offices in the Richnwid 

area and one in Farmviite, we're dedicate to provMir^ a full 

rar^e of "hometown" savings and investment sen^ic»s. 

for SmMrt Money Mana^rt 

Cifi2eii8 

SWINQSGIiOAN 

SiMoit, 1 17 M«M MeM, S^-2323 
ffrntm, SIONortfiMWn ^aet. §e2-2l^ 

f^rMRWril. ^M«r MM, \«4^ B«M««^ 4M-4541 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Fahey, the Lynnhaven 
borough representative. 
"So, what we have done 
instead is deflne the policy 
in a very positive way. 
Now, the guidelines are 



clearly drawn." 

Wallace concurred. 
"The fact that the school 
board will now be 
reviewing each and every 
case will make the people 
who administer corporal 
punishment think twice 



before doing so," he said. 
"Now, they'll have to 
make sure they explore 
every alternative and 
determine if there is real 
justification for using 
corporal punishment. 
"In effect, we have 



nearly done away with 
corporal punishment", 
Wallace continued. "The 
instances of corporal 
piinishment being ad- 
ministered in Virginia 
Beach ^hools are ab- 
solutely minimal in com- 



School Board Meetings 
Attendance Is Low 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Yet, "the average citizen is just not connected to the 
schod system. 

"I'd love to sec more caicern in education," Fahey 
explained. "Input is really healthy because it helps us 
determine what is in the best interests of the 
community. ^ 

"Whether there are a lot of peq?le at the meetings ot 
not does not affect my approach to my responsibility," 
he said. "I still get the job done." 

Doris Dclaney, president <rf the Virginia Beach 
GcMnnl of the Parent-Teacher Association, said the 
school board is ddng a good job. so citizens feel no 
need to participate. "CXw of the reasons you don't see 
as many people at the meetings is that the school 
s^tem enjoys wide acceptance and a good reputation," 
she said. Delaney agreed with Mhers in asserting that 
the munidpal <»ntcr's location may diswwrage some 
from atteiKlug. "There are |»obably a lot of wwking 
parents and teachera who would like to attend, but 
auuwt," she sml. "I feel, thoi^h, if somebody really, 
really wanted to go, they wouW." Delaney questioned 
tte notkxi that Virginia Bead! citizens are ai»thetic, 
however. "We have 25,000 members in the PTA, which 
b 3,000 more than last year. All the people 1 work with 
are very involi«d." 

James Chapman, executive director of the Virginia 
Beach Edu(»tion Assodatioi, said the meeting times 
and locations are determined for financial reasons, not 
to discourage dti^n invdvement. "1 suspect the 
Mhninistra^B wants the meeting during the day 
because they have a number of antral personnel they 
want at their beck and call during the meetings," he 
said. "Those pe<^le ah-eady wwk a full schedule, 
tiKMvh, ud ttw costs for (M^ertiroe would be a lot." 

to NcrMk. three sctaxri baud meetings a year are 
teM at aigltt at diffierent ichods. More tiMn ISO 



Norfolk residents usually attend these sessicHis. In 
Portsmouth, the school board meets at night every 
month, and attracts approximately 23 citizens each 
time. 

Chapman, however, is unconvinced that night 
meetings would benefit the Virginia Beach Schod 
Board. "Looking at some of the night meetings we've 
already had, 1 dcxi't know if there is a need at all." 
Hood said he "iwver was too much in fiivor of fneeting 
at night." Fahey agreed. "Meetings at night don't 
seem to draw any more peopte than the day meetings. 

People wishing to (xntact their school board 
representatives can reach them as follows: 

Robert H. Callis, Jr., Virginia Beach borough; lOS 
48th Street, Vyginia Beach, 23451, lAonc: 627-5435. 

Rd}ert W. Oybum, at large; 6312 Howell Road, 
Virginia Beach, 23462, phone: 497-3516. 

Homer W. Cunningham, at luge; P. O. Box 4549, 
Virginia Beach, 23454. 

Jdm A. Fahey, Lynnhaven borough; 901 HUow 
Drive, Virginia Beach, 23454, phone: 4403979. 

James N. Fletcher, at large; 4588 ^%ginia Be«di 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 23462, phone: 497-9311. 

Leland M. Itood. Pungo borough; Route 3, Box 3(^3, 
Virginia Beach, 23457, phone: 4^-2190. 

Reva Kelberg, KemjKviUe borough; 712 Kne TVcc 
I>ive, Virginia Beach, 23452, phone: 3^M979. 

Nwris W. ^rley, MiMXts Anm boro^h; I¥incess 
Anne Station, Virginia Be«*, 23456, jAnoci 427-^M5. 

Laura M. Tcbault, Uackwater borai«h; 47M) 
Blackwater Road, Vuiinia Bcsu:h, 23457, phone: 
427-4280. 

Dr. Ehmcan S. Wallace. Bayside boroigh; 4696 
Hc»eygrove Ro^. Virginia ^ach, 23455, i^ione: 
460-24M. 

Dr. Ra^ A. Woock, at la^e; t02» Western Drive, 
Virginia Beach. 2345S. phone: 461-2910. 



parision to just a few years 
ago." Wallace added he 
would like to one day see 
corporal punishment 
completely removed from 
the school system, but, at 
this time, "that just 
doesn't look possible." 

Both board members 
said they were somewhat 
surprised at the ease in 
which their efforts were 
approved. "Just say I was 
pleasantly surprised," 
Wallace said. "We have a 
very enlightened school 
board, and that is reflec- 
tive of the attitude 
exhibited by the supoin- 
tendent." Fahey called his 
fellow board members 
"reasonable i}eople who 
are open to new ideas." 

Vice chairman Robert 
H. Callis. who represents 
the Virginia Beach 
borough, was the lone 
dissenter. He said he voitd 
as he did because he was 
unclear about the wording 
of the motion. "I just 
wanted to make sure that 
we were not making new 
policy off the cuff." Callis 
explained that normal 
school board procedure is 
to vote on motions which 
have already been for- 
mally drawn up, tj^jed, 
and distributed to the 
members. "We didn't 
have anything down on 
;»per and I mlly just was 
not sure of what it was we 
were voting on. So, in- 
stead of outing a vMt in 
bad (X}ns^mce, I decMed 
to oppc»e tte flMMMO.'* 

epulis said the p<rfiQF 
diM^i wUl make "Mttle 
differ^Kx" in tte t^uam 
in which corperel 
punishment is alr^^ 
handled. 



■ £• 



f 



A ^^ 



4 Virgiiua Beach Sun. August 25, 1982 



Beach Entertainment 

Beacher Bill Thompson 
Wins WGH Photoquest '82 



4 



Virginia Beach 
resident Bill Thom- 
pson received kudos 
last week, taking top 
honors in the Harbor- 
fest Photoquest 1982 
contest, sponsored by 
WG.H radio. 

Thompson, who 
won first place in the 
professional photo- 
^aphy category, said 
he used a Cirkit 
camera from 1917 to 
snap his award- 
winning photo. The 
contest, to find the 
best pictures of the 
weekend-long festivi- 
ties held in Virginia 



Beach's western 
neighbor's downtown 
section in June, at- 
tracted 425 entries. 
Thompson said his 
photo, a three-feet- 
long shot of the Nor- 
folk horizon, was 
taken "while I was 
hanging off a con- 
dominium roof in 
Portsmouth," 
Thompson was given 
$100, a blue ribbon, 
and a certificate. 



Several other 
Virginia Beach 
residents fared well in 
the ceremonies, held 



in the Ramada Inn off 
Newtown Road. 
Jonathan Best 
received honorable 
mention in the 
children's division, 
while Michelle Sikes 
and Laura King both 
won runners-up 
honors in the 
division. 

James Hayworth 
and Melinda Sykes 
were both honor^ as 
runners-up In tfie 
student category. 

In the amateur 
category, two beach 
residents were named 



runners-up. They 
were Brian Storide 
and Elaine Polizos. 
All received cash 
prizes from WG.H 
and gift coolers or ice 
buckets from Kodak. 
Winners were as 
follows: Best 

Children's photogr- 
aphy, Marie Mitchell 
of Norfolk; Best 
student's Photogr- 
aphy: Leslie Rowe of 
Portsmouth; Best 
Trdfessidiiar, Thom- 
pson; and Best 
Amateur Photogr- 
aphy, Mike Matthews 
of Norfolk. 




Mike Mattkevm (^Norfolk won best plioto of the contest witk tUi shot. 



connfonus 

FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO K^OW 



To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 




Every 
morning 
and after- 
noon. WGH-1 3 broadcasts a 
total of 22 up-to-the-nninute 
traffic reports. One for you 
every 1 5 nninutes. to and 
fronn work. Listen, and get to 
where you're going, on tinne. 

Accu-Weather 
Keeps You 
Ahead of 





Mother N. 

Every nnoming 
and afternoon. WGH- 1 3 broad 
casts a total of 30 exclusive 
Accu-Weather reports. Rain or 
shine: listen and you will be 
sure to know, before it 
happens. 



For Who, What. 
Where. When, Fast. 

Every morning and 
afternoon. WGH- 13 
broadcasts a total of 1 5 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen. 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

If you're driving alone, you will 
be singing along. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tapping 
your toes. The 
music is the 
magic of WGH- 13. 





«w«^nestPh 





BUI Thonpson of Yirffada Bcack stands before ids prize-winning plioto (above right). 



■ "f^.itj ,1 Oi 



Tabiernacle Hosts Music, Food 

The Tabernacle Methodist Church will host country 
and western music and refreshments on Saturday, 
August 28 from 4 to 8 p.m. on the church lawn. 

The menu will include fried chicken, barbecue, old 
fashioned pound cake and lemonade. 

Music will be provided by "Borrowed Time." 

The church is located at 126S Sandbridge Road.. Call 
426-6587 for more information. 

Star Of The Sea Youths 
Present "That's Entertainment" 

theSea Youth Group. 

Jazz At 
White Oaks 

The Young Audiences' 
American Jazz Ensemble 
will perform at White 
Oaks Elementary School, 
960 Windsor Oaks 
Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, on Saturday, 
August 28, at 12 Noon. 

The performance is 
sponsorod by the Virginia 
Chapter of Young 
Audiences and Cultural 
Experiences Unlimited 
and is free and open to the 
public. 



Star of the Sea Youth 
Group will stage a variety 
show, "That's Entertain- 
ment," on Friday, August 

27. , 

The show will be held 
in the Star of the Sea 
gymnasium, located at 315 
15th Street between 
Pacific Avenue and Arctic 
Crescent. The show begins 
at 8 P.M. 

The show will be a 
combination of music, 
skits, and comedy. Tickets 
will be sold at the door for 
$2 per adult and SI per 
child; with proceeds 
benefiting the Star of 



lugh 




Courtesy of Danny McClain 

1. SurvivOT ~ Eye Of The Tiger 

2. Chicago ~ Hard To Say I'm Sorry 

3. Fleetwood Mac ~ Hdd Me 

4. Crosby, StUls & Nash - Wasted On The Way 

5. Melissa Manchester - You Should Hear Ftow 

6. EltCMi Jdm ~ Blue Eyes 

7. Juice Newton -Break It To Me Gently 

8. Paul McCartney ~ Take It Away 

9. Kenny Rogers - Love Will 1\im You Arwnd 

10. Air Supply - Even The Nights Ai€ Better 

11. hBcdette Larscm ~ I Only Want To Be With You 

12. foto ~ Rosanna 

13 JackscHi Browne ~ Scwnebody's Baby 

More super-groups of the 70's this week on the 
countdown. . . Join Danny McCJain tonight at 

9. 1 .,,.,-- 



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Virgima Beach Suij. August 25, 1^2 5 




Steppenwolf 
Gives Beach 
First-Class Act 



lou deserve a fine meal expertly 
served in the relaxed atmosphere of Old Virginia. 

That's just what you get at the Aberdeen Barns. 



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Vi^lnia Beach, Va. 

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IN OUR COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
William Burneli 

Mcuor Credit Cards Accepted 




By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writo- 

Oid musidans are like 
old buildings. Rather than 
growing, changing, and 
gracefully maturing, thQr 
become weathered and 
remain as monuments to 
what once was. 

Virginia Beach has seen 
its share of one-great pw- 
formers trying to regain 
footholds on their long- 
lost star biUings. A few 
weeks back it was Joe 
Cocker on the comeback 
trail. Last week, two vir- 
tual dinosaurs of the 
world of rock came to 
town. Three Dog Night 
and Steppenwolf. 

It was the third ap- 
pearance in Virginia 
Beach in as many years for 
John Kay and Steppen- 
wolf, and although the 
crowd at Itogues probably 
expected an evening of 
1960's memorabilia, they 
were treated instead to a 
first-class, contemporary 
concert. 

Kay, the lead singer and 
only original member of 
the band, was superb 
throughout, belting out 
the lyrics with a vengence. 
New members in the band, 
bassist Gary Link and 
keyboardist Michael Wilk 
provided punch to the old 
Steppenwolf anthems, 
while drummer Steve 
Palmer and guitarist 
Michael Palmer added 
spark to material from the 
band's new album, "Wolf 
Tracks." 

This new blend of 
musical talents made for a 
most (51ij6ytfB!e perfor- 
mance. The band opened 
with a trio of oldies, and 
then burst into a new song 
by and old group. The 
song was "Hold Your 
Head Up" by Argent, and 
the vitallity exuded by 
Steppenwolf on this num- 
ber was like the pause 
that refreshed. 

The band launched into 
a strategy, whereby it 
would play one old hit 
followed by two newer 
songs. All of the new 
material was politely 
received by the Virginia 
Beach Boulevard night- 
club crowd, particularly 
one tune from the new 



L.P. caUed "Time." Still, 
the audience yearned for 
two songs in particular, as 
many of the acne-scarred 
youths in attendance 
screamed for them at 
every opportunity. The 
songs were, of course, 
"magic Carpet Ride" and 
"Born To be Wild," 
Steppenwolf's signature 
.tunes. The band did not 
dissappoint, and they 
play«J^tiie songs to near- 
perfection closing the set. 
Two standing ovation en- 
I cores ensued, prompting 
Steppenwolf to play 
"Monster" as a nightcap. 
"We originally wrote 
this song about the things 
we didn't like during the 
Vietnam War," Kay told 
the audience. "Hopefully, 
this song still has some 
significance today and we 
can get rid of the man we 
have now in the White 
House." Much of the 
son's underlying theme, 
an examination of 
American values in a time 
of social uncertainly, 
seemed lost on the youth- 
ful crowd. Still, they 
cheered in utter delight, 
flashing peace signs and 
having a grand time of it. 

Watching John Kay and 
a cast newcomers call 
themselves Steppenwolf 
would be somewhat akin 
to watching Paul McCar- 
tney and Wings call them- 
selves the Beatles. In 
either case, it just 
shouldn't work. Still, this 
year's version of Step- 
penwolf proved to be a 
, first-class rock band of the 
80's, desptie its personnel 
changes. They should be 
judged accordingly. 




John Kay of Steppenwolf perfomu daring recent Whisper Concerts show 



VALLE'S 
SHORE DINNER 



Video Views 

Courtesy of 
The Music Den 
CHARIOTS OF FBffi - The time is 1924. Britain's finest 
athletes have begun their quest iot glory in the CMympic 
games. Their success will win hon«- fw their natitm - 
but for two champion runners, the hcmor at stake is a 
perswial hcmor - and the challenge they face is a 
challenge from within. 

THE CCM^IPEiniCW - Paul and Heidi are ccmpeting 
against one another fw cme of the music world's most 
impaiant awards. They should be hostile - they 
shouldn't like each other - instead they fall in love. It's 
this competition which tests the strength of their love. 

NORMA RAE - Norma Rae, portrayed by Sally Field, is 
grinding out her life in a small southern town as a 
worker in a ncm-union textile %ho^. She joins forces with 
a New York labor organizer to unionize the Southern 
mill. She wins out against overwhelming odds and 
discovers she has real intelligence and courage. A 
powerful film!! 



A t Norweigian Lady 



Faculty Lab Band 
To Perform Sunday 






The Schod of Music, 
Lieutenant Qxnmander 
Dan Qemcns, MSH, Com- 
manding Officer, has an- 
nounced a concert by the 
Faculty Lab Band to be 
held on Sunday evening, 
7:30 P.M., August 29 at 
the Norwegian Lady on 
Atlantic Avenue and 2Sth 
Street in Virginia Beach. 

The ccaicert, under the 
directioi of Sergeant First 
Qass Mike Morgan, USA, 
will offer a variety of 
music including big band, 
jazz, and pop selections. 
Virginia Beach native. 



I^tty Officer First Class 
Dennis Allard, USN, wiD 
be featured as vocalist 
alcxig with sdos perform- 
ed by Sergeant Dean &ig- 
lert, USMC oa tromboM, 
Specialist Six Mite Walk- 
er, USA on tenor sa3K>- 
phone, and Sergeant An- 
dy Omdahl, USMC On 
trumpet. 

Jdn the Schod of Mu- 
sic Faculty Lab Band for 
an evening of musical 
entertainment. The con- 
cert is free and open Vb the 
public. 



'"■^ 




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6 Virginia Beach Sun, August 25, 1982 




Garcia Hosts Sheik, Friends 



Vil^inia Beach Sheriff Joe Smith, who used to write for the Associated Press, atten- 
ded Garcia's reception. 




Virginia Beach land developer Edward Garcia recently 
hosted His Excellency Sheik Dr. Muhammad Al-Fassi, who 
was in Virginia Beach on economic and diplomatic business. 
(See editorial, page 2). 



m 







North Carolina's Scotty Knight displays the Arabian Prize win- 
ner A. M. Count Anjum. 



Thk ihol of tbc Garcia nUtc, M acres acar the Mutdpal Ccatn', wai tatai tnm a bcHcoplN' Garcia 
chartered for tkc occailoa. A fcatarc oh Garda't home aid faoyiy trill be ta aot wcck't Vlr^ata Beack 
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•'■ ^^•^•^•^^ffgfmmmmmmnmmm 



Virgiaia Beach Sun, At^ust 25, 1982 7 




w 



Public Notice 

A Location and Design Public Hearii^^ai be hdd by 
representatives of the Virgiiiia DepartniWl of Highways 
and Transportation on September ^, 1982, at 7:00 
P M in the Brandon Jumor High School Auditonum 
located at 1700 Pope Street, in Virkginia Beach, for Ow 
purpose of considering the proposed locaUon and 
design of Route 190 (KcmpsviUe Road) from 0.13 nule 
south of Indian River Road to 0.20 mile south of Cen- 
t»viBe Turnpike, in the ajy(rfVirflniaB«ch. 

All in^«sted parti« are ur^ to attend and give the 
Department the benefit of their comments and 
suggestions relative to the proposed highway im- 

'^Maps, drawings, an enviroiimental ass«s^«, and 
other information are avaUaWc for public ^w and 
copying in the Departoent of Hlghw«« awtpaMpor- 
uSwstrict Office tocated at 1700 North Mam Str^ 
Tsuffolk, in m Regency <Mto„to^^*^ j^g- 
l«iion of Buil^ Route » m^t ^^) -d 
Route 168 in CAtm>&ke, and in the office of the Direc- 
to of Pirt^c W«ki for the <^ <rf V«»M«e«A. 

RepresentaUves of the D^wtmrt wfll toe^fent *» 
theftrandon Junior High Schod Audit<mu« from 4:30 
to 6-30 P.M. on tte aft«noO« of the puWc hearing, 
to in infwiwtf «view of avaitaWe infwm^JB by m- 

tor©^ewthe^^o«l|WOTt°*«'<*^*^^' 

Writtra sti^n«a ad <^^^ exhibits r^tive to the 
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-rt^tt ma «^*» »»*y •^ ^ "*!!^*?* *®3* 

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|327 H^St, 




CHESAPEAKE NEPHROLOG YASSOCIA TES 

Annourux the Opening of an Office 

For the Practice of Nephrology 

(Medical Diseases of the Kidney) 

no Wimbledon Square, Suite F 

Chesapeake, Virginia 23320 

547-9431 

David W. B^t, M.p. 

Virginia Beach Dialysis Center 

1127 hrst Colonial Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 2^454 

481-4879 

Green Run Medical Cemm^ i 

3386 Holland Road, Suited 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 

468-0846 t 

Betty PY Yeh, MM. f 
770 Independence Circle Sui^ 101 
Virginia BetKh, Virginia 23455 

OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT 



I 



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Wi. -.^ \*^^-' ♦ .'t*'» '*f» 



8 Virginia Beach Suii, August 25, 1981 ' 




• ApplM to IK). 126 or 35mm 
original rol cohx prini dim 
(fuK tram*, C-4) pfoctss) 

• OOM not oppty lo GLOSSV 
PAPER on 110 or 126 

•Also AppKes To Disc Film 

At paiUdpaHng Itovco ttoiM only. 



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No matter where your pn^r^lon 
is t^ing fitted rww, \^'ll call your 
doctor afK:! arrar^ for It to be filled 
at Revco. 




•f^^Ci 






i 



i 



Senior Ennlc JoBM (34) breaks for daylight around left end during Princess Anne's Summer workouts last week. 

Coach Donahoe Assesses PA 

'Strong In Just About Every Department' 



By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff WritCT 

I To hear Princess Anne 
High School's head foot- 
ball coach Harper 
t>onahoe tell it, the world 
champion San Francisco 
l^orty-Niners had better 
watch their step. PA may 
be the fmest ass«nblage of 
foot1)all players on the 
face of the Earth. 



"We're r^l strcmg in 
Just about every de(»r- 
tment," said Donahoe. 
"In fact, we don't have 
any weaknesses on our 
squad that I can see. Iliey 
•re a whole bunch of 
'really good] 

Wiolntlijl 



however, Donahoe 
hastens to point out the 
I»'esence of First Colonial, 
Kempsville and Green 
Run in the Beach District. 
"We should have every 
chance to win the city 
championship if we can 
just get by those tough 
games," he said. "If we 
can do that, we should 
wrap it up." Donahoe 
said the Sept. 17 game 
against First Colonial will 
be the key contest of the 
season. 

Donahoe says he has 
good reason to boast: in 
his mind, PA has the most 
talented players at the 

"'•^As'far as running 



backs go, Maurice 
Williams an4 Ernie Jones 
are second to none," he 
said. "On the lines, we 
have three guys who go 
both ways, James Ford, 
Chuck Watson, and 
Darrell Ninmiow. If we 
lose one of those guys, it is 
really like losing two 
players." If that happens, 
however, Donahoe has a 
giant of a lineman, 280- 
pound Adolf Bell, waiting 
in the wings. 

Quarterback Oxry Men- 
sen "is throwing the ball 
real well," Donahoe 
reports. Mensen's 

pritnary uurfit this 
WW "be ' JUK ^B^ci", 
"real sp«Hly," Donahoe 



,said. "Don't let the fact 
that he is so small fool 
you. He can stand flat- 
footed under a basketball 
goal and dunk a basket- 



ball. He can really fly." 

The defense, Donahoe 
said, "has never been bet- 
ter" in his 10 years at PA. 



"If you tell me that you 
can find two linebackers 
anywhere better than 
Chuck Jackson and James 
Watson, then you are 




OffMfllVeline coach Joe Cox supervises drills. 



l)ing." Bell, Donahoe 
said, "will be real strong 
against the run, but we 
don't expect a great deal 
of quarterback sacks from 
him." .i 

There will be no gadget 
plays inserted into the PA 
playbook this year. 
Donahoe said. Instead, 
the team will stick with the 
fundamentals. "The old 
wrinkles work the best, 
anyhow," Donahoe said. 
The coach said observers 
could expect a similar of- 
fensive output this year as 
PA exhibited last year. 
"Of the 3,000 total yard 
we gained in 10 games, 
1,800 came by running • 
and 1,200 through 



passing," he said. "We 
ought to try to maintain 
that kind of balance again 
this year." 

Princess Anne opens it 
season Sept. 3 at Cox. On 
Sept. 10, PA visits Great 
Bridge. First Colonial will 
be PA's first home game 
Sept. 17. On Sept. 24, PA 
entertains Indian River. 
PA will visit Green Run 
Oct. 1 , and then face Nor- 
view at home Oct. 8. On 
Oct. 15, PA will play at 
Kellam, and on Oct. 22 
visit Kempsville. PA 
finishes out the regular 
season with two home 
games, Oct. 29 against 
Lake ^^dor and Nov. 5 
versus Bayside. 




I 



1 



Defensive Une coach Ken Whitley watches 2MHMHind Adolf BeU (55). 



Cheerleaden Lana IHinlqr, Mgette Bell and Theresa Higb«i prepare for Sept. 3 opener. 



Bob Harmon 



Penn State, Southern Miss. Heavily Favored 



: Brigham Young, whose offensive mania has been 
sudi a tremei^jas otywd-pleasing feature of , the last 
three HoUday Bowls, opew the 1^2 college, season on 
lliursday, September 2a&, meeting another offensive 
Helight. Nei^^Las Vegw. Last fiall, the B.Y. Cougan 
icored A6S polMs on tlKir miy to a 10-2 regular season 
wid a nation^ nmUng ct 13d} in our final ratings. 

€un To Kick Off 
Weekly Prognc^tications 

A weekfy foottaO contest spotlighting ^ punes, 14 
I8-0 ai^ six c»]^e, will i^mu- in the Septembe^ 8 
through Decenbo- 22 editiCNis of the Virginia B^di 
Sun. 

TtM ooBi'beA, ^omBKtd ^ local business^, wfU offer 
^foUinriogi^beseicliweek: SlOO for a pofect M(Me, 
^ tot firit pUmx, and SIS for second place. 
fTo partkap^p Ac tm^ muM mail in tte ^try form 
fel^ittng i^> he thtefi wUI win Mdi of d» 20 sunes. 
Entrants wlU be M(ted ^^ f^ek in then- pr»lkti<»s by 
ID ymn txfenmBe irt^i ttey i^ul the Itob Hannon 
ft^eoM 1^ |m> B<^s, wkMk mil a)q$ear in this («p«' 

Three "p rt^io i acator i fh» te f^mia A«kA Am 
mn lA try telt hnd at pndlet^^^ ytu** wl^^ 
Ihmh, tM. Hn^ an Wah^ Uw^on, Jamie Brawn 
■MlMk«Awft«. 

W^Mfft wU be Asum by m^um up the nunto* ctf 
ttwrei^ ^^tfctioui. 



Brigham Young's scaring total in the three post-season 
games was 121 paints in two wins and a loss, including 
last year's 38-36 thriUer over Washington State. 
However, one erf those two losses during the regular 
season last &11 was a wikl 45-41 set-back at the hands of 
the sanw Ne\^ft Rebels. Snoring last year, we're 
expectmg a big win by the Cougars. 

In our final column last fall ^t prior to the bowl 
ganoes, we said ". . .if Georgia beats tHttsburgh - and 
we think it will • aiKi if Oemson loses to Nebraska - and 
we think that will happen too - then Georgia «^)uld 
be^BM our national dMmf^sn." WeU, we were wrong 
on bothcounts and Qemson was everybody's national 
dMnqxan aflber whinpmg Neteaska in the Oange Bowl 
22-lS. Pitt beat Georgia in the Aigar Bowl 24-^. But 
we're going out oil the Umb igain. I^t year's 
seraod-raidBd ^lUigs entertain the Hgers mMon- 
day, September 6th, and we think (outylM that's our 
traubte. . .too mudi tUnU^I) Geoiiia wiU optn 1^2 
with an u|wet tmn over Ctemson. 

MianI aw^Med Ftoricta 21-20 in ttwir opcMr kst 
fidl, and tlM Iftirricans went on to pott a 9-2 seuon 
recant pbu a No. 11 national rankli^. IteUa was 
si^eed 1^ West Virginki m the Peadi Bowl ^-6. This 
j^ar the Gaton are inched to turn the tables uxl nip 
hiiami. 

ttewhere, Penn SttOe shooU c^m up Ten^ (the 
OiHs haw ocaistaBaHf given tl» bittanfes md^esAxi 
in tlMS iMst). . .Ariafflna tete is heavily favored over 
d^gOR. . .nd Southun Jtttsks^n wiU romp a Ut at 
the esq^ense of ^fertte«t Louisiana. 



New NFL Rules Outlined 



At their annual spring meeting last March, National 
FootbaU League owners approved several rules 
changes and interpretations for the 1982 season. 
Amtmg them were: 

Possession by a received was re-defined, hi order for 
a received to be in possession, he must control the ball 
while clearly touching both feet~or tflay part of his body 
other than his hands~to the ground inbounds. If the 
player is hit, causing the ball to come loose 
simultanecxisly with touching inbounds, there is no 
possessioi. 

Incidental graspint of the fiacemask remains a 
five-yard penalty, but if it is odled on the defense, it is 
no loiter an automatic first down. 

Hard or soft hip pads not covered by the outer 
uniform are illegal. 

Pass interference was more specifically defined. 
Incklental movement or a»ta^ thM may occur when 
two cr more players mal« a simultaneous and iKXia fide 



attempt to catch <x bat the ball is not pass interference. 
If there is any questicxi about the acts being 
simultaneous, it is not interference. j 

In the last two minutes of ahalf, when an u^ory time 
out has been called, the umpire, not the field judge, 
shall signal expiraticxi of the 10-second period before 
which the clock may be put in motion. Foub by either 
team during this period shall stop the clock. After the 
penalty for the foul is assessed, the umpire will 
complete running off the remainder of 10-second ccxmt. 

Rules were dlected that allowed the coadies or 
referee to shcxten specific perids of a game due to 
darkness. 

A rule was deleted that prdiibited double shifts 
within the opponent's 20 yard line. 

The penahy fa* illegal punching «- batting of the ball 
was changed from IS yards to 10 yards. 

Illegal kicking of the ball with the leg or foot was 
changed fttxna IS-yard penalty to a 10-yard penalty. 



i 



AP, UPI to Carry Virginia High School Football Scores 



In a r«»nt newsletter, the Virginia High School 
L^tgue, Inc. announce that the football team standii^ 
will be made available to schools uid tte news nmlia 
teough press releases made to the Associate Press and 
the United Pr^ International. Releases will desi^iate 
iK top taJl^ ^ each classifioition based on the VSHL 
lUtiog System, ii(xording to tlw letter. 



1^ letter also suggest^ that schools keep their point 
tofads update in order to doubte ^ck tlK VSHL 
releases. 

The VHSL also r^uestnl that c^MK^es te mme con- 
s<^ntious this year in reporting game saves jmwiptly to 
the Impropriate soune. 



rV 



'^mmm^mmmmm^eF'^'^f^mum"^-*- ■.- jf-iMnM^t-m 



tmmm^imm^mmm 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, August 25 1982 

Sun Series, Part 3 




iBStBrdCiy • • • The coraentone is laid hi 1927. 



lOfflOrrOW ••• New addltioiu, projected for 19S7. 



V 



Old-Timers Reflect Upon Hotel's History 



This is the final installment qf a three-pan 
Virginia Beach Sun series on the Cavalier Hotel. 
This segment will trace the 53 year-old hotel's 
roots and point to its fiiture. 

By Mike Gooding 

Sun Suff Writer 

Thomas W. Fentress, Joseph Waltrai and 
Carlos Wilson have seen it all from the grassy 
hills which overlook the Atlantic Ocean. The 
Great E>epressi(m. World War II. Korea. 
Vietnam. Watergate. The wwld has changed 
dramatically, but the Cavalier, their home, family 
and employer foe all these years, remains 
unscathed, a testament to tradition. 

It was a time when very little money went a very 
long way, Waltcxi remembered. "The guests 
used toccnne and stay fcM- the whole summer," he 
said. "They'd pay $10 a djEiy. ^d th^t }iif:lu49d a}!, 
free meals. :i "fc ,j:^( ,t^^: 'UC/.v : v., ,:,; ':- vLfi..' 
,j<; "We lived heiis at Ac hotel for $30 a nfonA." 
he continued. "They gave us three square meals 
and pressed our unifcHms daily. As far as I'm 
concerned, this was the most excellent job 
around. I felt very priviledged to work here. In 
fact, I really felt as though I was rich." 

Walton, a bellman, first came to the Cavalier in 
1929 seeking employment as a caddy at the 
hotel's country club. On that same day, he was 
talked into becoming a bus boy. He began his 
career with the hotel then, and along the way has 
been a waiter and has shined shoes for 7S cents a 
day. "The money didn't really matter," he said. 
"We always had a roof over our heads and food to 
eat." 

Walton remembered his fondest experience at 
the hotel. "I got called upcm to take a bottle of 
champaign to one of the rocxns upstairs," he said. 
"I didn't think it was any big deal, untU I c^ned 
the doOT and there in the room was Elizabeth 
TaylOT. I about dropped my tray." Walton said 
he got the actress' autograph, which he gave to 
his grandson. "A lot of people say she has gotten 
fat. Well, let me tell you, she is the most 
beautiful wcxnan in the wwld, and she is very, 
very warm." 

WaltcHi said other thrills he has experienced 
have comt upcxi meeting other famous guests in 
the hmel such as Victoria Principal, Gary Colks, 
Roger Mudd, Lady Bird Johnson and Muhammad 
Ali. 

"One of the reascms I don't leave, even after aU 
these years is sitting right across the street," 
W^tcm said of the original hotel. "It is the 
grandest facility in the state. I haven't seen any 
other hotel surpass it in elegance or beauty. & is 
just like Budweiser says— when you say Qivalier, 
you've said it all." 

Wilson, a bartender, first came to the hotel in 
1938. The key to hislongetivity in tl^ business is 
simple, he said: treat everyme equally. 
"Everyone is the same in this hotel," he sidd. 
"It doesn't matter if they are rich or Samous. If 
they are guests in this hotel, we treat them as if 
they were royalty." 

When he first came to the Cavalier, things were 
somewhat different, Wilson sakl. "Hm guests 
were your perscnal guests," he said. "From the 
time they entered the hotel, if tlwy sta^ for a 
day (X for a month, you were tlMir personal 
servant. You got to kixm their names and they 
got to know yours. It was a kx more persomd iMck 
then. 

"The tips weren't ta great then as they are 
now," Wilson continued, "But everything was 
much cheaper then, too. TIm people were much 
more courteous also. You coulctai't get into the 
dining room tl^n unless yoa were well-<^essed 
and had a reserva^n. Tod^f, they coom te 
wearing tmthing suits." 

The old hotel "wu a dty wk^ a ^," ^HboB 
reiMmbeivd. "We ^d evtfyd^: do^on « 
\hc prqxrty, a steamtatth, stares. You at^et had 
to leave the hotel because everythi^ you'd ever 
need was right tlwre." 

WarU^ for the Gavafor, Wftoi said, htt 



been the most rewarding experience in his life. 
"When we started out, we didn't make much 
moiey, but we appreciated what we got," he 
said. "This company has been very good to me 
over the years. It has helped me to educate my 
two daughters at the same time, and I know that is 
something I never would have been able to do." 

Fentress is the company's oldest employee, 
having served the Cavalier continuously since 
1928. Despite what he calls a "grand assoda* 
stion" with the hotel over the years, Fentress can 
remember some tough times there, too. 

"The Depressioi came in nineteen-hundred 
and twenty-nine, and it was really kind of sad," 
he said. "A lot of people got wiped out and had to 
leave the hotel. Business was real slow. 

"For a time, we worked for nothing," Fentress 
continued. "We'd go two or three months at a 
time without getting paid, but we weren't too 
woried because we had shelter and food. That ., 
was all we really needed anyways." 

A decade late|,, , World War II was gearing _^^ 

up, and the Cavalier was converted into ieii fadv ^ 
schod for the United States Navy. Nearly all pf 
the hotel's employees were let go, but not 
Fentress. 

"The hotel was also used as a place to keep 
German sddiers as imsoners," he remembered. 
"Those guys, though, they Idnd of ticUed me." 
Fentress recalled having jdced witn^he Nazi 
pris(»ers about automobiles. "They w^e pretty 
nice peqple CHice you got to talking to them," he 
added. 

The worst period, however, was when the 
wiginal Cavalier was shut down in 1972 in favor of 
the new oceanfront resort. "I felt like I was 
entering another era when that dd hotel closed 
down," he said. "I felt like I was losing a lot of 
dd memories and a lot of dd ft%nds." 

The original property was, of course, refurbish- 
ed and reopened in 1978^ Despite the fact that 
Fentress has since became a waiter in Uie new 
8mSPA,Pi«c11 




.1 






/ OdOy • • • Tlw new liotd, opened in 1972. 







iMipfc Wrtlwi. 



Virginia Beadi Sun, August 2S. 1^2 11 



Spa, Convention Center On Tap 



fiotel, he was extremely hawjy to see the old hotel 

pesume business. "It made vm f o back to the old 

pays when it reopened," hs said. 

* Still, however, it wasn't quite the same. 
•There's no comparison,^' he said. "Everything 
as much better then. From the service to the 
rom^. One oi the things thiu made the 

,,-uvaUer iTo elegant was the beautiful sunken 

iBardens. It made the place into a rountry 

pudeaway^^' 

I Today, Fentress still adheres to the sanw 

Eidards he did when he joined the staff at age 
"Being a poor boy like I was. I learned not to 
te anythmg," he said. "I was ahvays polite to 
Mie custonurs, too." 

L Fentress said he will remember the nights 
^ hen he thinks of the good times oSlm youth at 
bie hotel. "We weren't allowed to swim <» the 
peach duri^ the day, so we waited until after 
llark," he said. "We'd go swimming then, and 
pe iud the biggest time. Alto, we'd go down to 
Ihe sunken gardens and sw9p storin. Hie nights 
pvere the grandest times." 
r The GavaUer tai the Fotnit 

I 

f The growth and diange that has marked the 
^otel's S3 yevs shall continue according to ^ce 
presideut Bcyd Qdgate. Two major renovations 
pre slated to occur, which Colgate says will 
Iransform the Cavalier into one of the premiere 
resorts in America. 

I By March IS. 1983, a complete health spa 
Should be ready for business, Colgate said. 
^xKated within the old hotel's basement, the 
aadlities will include a 20-station exercise 
pnachine, sauna, steam room, massages, a 
|me-mile jogging course, and an indoor pool. 
•: " We want to became the La Costa <^ the East," 
^jolgate said, ccmiMuing the Virginia Beach hotel 
^th the fiEunous ORlifomia fitness resort. "Ilw 
Chairman of a corporation will be able to come 
^ere, spend a few weeks getting in shape, and 




Observers watch 1927 grmiiiif breddag ceicmonles 



operate his entire business from our phone 
system. Hopefiilly, the spa could develop into a 
year round busmess." 

The secoid change will be the addition to the 
new hotel of an 18,000 foot convention center. 
Construction is projeaed to start in 1984, with 
completion slated for 1987. "With 426 roomsj 
presently, we need space to serve 700 to 800 
persons for dinner at one sitting," Cdgate said. 
"Ibis convention center will move us to 630 



rooms. We will then become the largest and most 
complete convention center in the state. 

"I really want to see this done before I die," 
Cdgate said. "But, this will not be done at the 
expense of the things which have made this 
property great in the past. Our goal will be, as it 
always has been, to make sure that every hunoan 
body that leaves the hotel leaves with happy 
thoughts, good memories, and a desire to one day 
come back. We're winning now, and we will win 
then." 



^twenty Years in Space: Footsteps' To Be Highlighted at Planetarium 



Phe Virginia Beach 
P|blic Schools 

Pl^etarium program for 



Septembo' will be "Twen- 
ty Years in Space: Foot- 
steps." 



'Mil 



Sbns of Italy Arts and Crafts 



Ihe Sons of Italy Roma 
Lcilge will sponsor its first 
ai^ual arts and crafts 
sU|w on Saturday, Sept. 
25^om 10 a.m. to S p.m. 
at^Uie Roma Lodge, 3097 
MJ^k Hdlow ftoed (tfr< 




Lynnhaven Parkway. 

DeadliM for table rent- 
al is Sept. 18. I^oceeds 
will go to charity. 

For more information, 
catt 497-3J12 or 340-9734. 



This program opens 
with a chronological 
history of stories about 
trips to the moon that in- 
spired man's actual 
Apollo missions. 

Highlights of many 
space accomplishments 
are included, from 
S^lab, our first orbiting 
spacjB station, to Space 
Shuttle, the space bus of 
the ftiture. 



Visuals used in this 
program include repor- 
ductions of space art, ac- 
tual color photographs, 
movies, fihnloops, film- 
strips, panoramas, and 
other planetarium special 
effects. 



PLANETARIUM 
HOURS: Sunday, 7 p.m. 
to 8 p.m., Sept. 5, 12, 19 



and 26, and Tuesday, 7 
p.m. to 8 p.m., Sept. 7, 
14, 21 and 28. 

The planetarium is 
easily accessible from the 
Route 44 toll road by 
taking the LynnhaveA Exit 
(Exit S) to the Lyimhaven 
Parkway, and turning 
right at the first street, 
South Lynnhaven Road, 
jto Plaza Junior High 



School where the 
planetarium is located. 

The planetarium seats 
120 people. Telephone the 
main office at Plaza 
Junior High School 
...486- 1971... for reser- 
vations. Children under 
age 12 may be refused 
admission unless accom- 
panied by a mature per- 



*"> 



Sti.Wi f I 







To insure the safety of our school age children in Virginia Beach, it is essential that those 
of us who operate motor vehicles drive with extreme caution now that school is back in 
session. 

Many children in Virgiiiia Beach walk to school and they still have summer on their min- 
ds, instead of being alert for automobiles. 

Our children are the most prdbious resources that Virginia Beach has for the future and 
because of this we need to \jit especially alert durii^ school hours. 





Help us protect our future by driving very carefully, 
especially near school zones. 

!- 

This message is sponsored by these local 
Virginia Beach Businesses and parents. 



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It's That Time 
For Fescue Lawns 



It is that time ' of year when Virginia Beadi 
homeowners should begin making plasa for either 
establishing a fescue lawn or getting the okl one back in 
shape. Fescue does best in the cool weather of M 
through spring. 

Fescue tends to weaken and go off color during the 
summer when it is hot and humid. Wgh temperatures 
and abundant rainfall provide ideal ctmditions for 
disease problems. JSrown patch, ddlar spot, and leaf 
spot have been quite serious on fescue this summer. In 
some cases an entire lawn may be severely infected in 
just a few hours. 

You may find it necessary to overseed the lawn in 
September or October. It isn't too early to locate a 
source of good seed. Be sure and purdiase Fescue 31 
which is 982 pure and has been germinatioi tested 
during 1982. Two new varieties of fine fescue that have 
done quite well in Virginia Beach are Rebel and FaloHi. 

Planting only fescue is preferred. If a mixture 
oxitaining bluegrass is desired, the percentage of 
bluegrass in the mixture should not exceed ten. Avoid 
using ryegrass with fescue, it is too competitive and 
tends to weaken the fescue. 

If you are establishing a new lawn w you haven't had 
the soil tested in the last two years, it could save you 
money. Soil samples should be submitted as soon as 
possible if you expect the results back by early 
September. Soil analysis is free and soil for testing may 
be dropped off at any Virginia Beach Library, 
Tlmberlake Nursery, or Loidon Bridge Nursery. 

Fertilizer and lime recOTimendations for your lawn 
will be provided with the test results. Using the cwrect 
amounts of fertilizer and lime will save you maiey and 
you wil have a healthier lawn. 

The (^timum time to establish a fescue lawn is 
Mid-September through October. A well-prepared 
seedbed is essential for the establishment of turfgrass. 
The soil should be tilled to a depth of 6-8 inches, and 
lime and fertilizer worked into the sdl befwe seeding. 
If you purchase tc^soil, this should alsobe wwked into 
the existing sdl. More problems result frcMn spreading 
a layer of topsoil over your soil and the grass may never 
by healthy. ^ 

Without a sdl test it is impossible to know the exact 
amount of fertilizer or lime you need to mix into the 
sdl, but experience has shown that some basic 
averages are usually pretty close. Examples of 
complete fertilizers that furnish enough nutrients ioi 
establishment are: 50 pounds of 5-10-5/1000 sq. ft.. 25 
pounds of 10-20-10/1000 sq. ft., cm- 25 pounds erf 5-20- 
10/1009SC* fk- ' Mcvtmimr laiKBB wiM also rcquiiv aboitt < 
100 pounds of ground limestone per 1,000 sq. ft. 

During September, the Cooperative Extension 
Service will be conducting classes iot homeowners who 
need information about establishing a lawn and how to 
maintain the one they presently have. These classesa 
are designed to provide you with the best infcrmation 
presently available on turfgrass culture in Vu-ginia 
Beach. For spedfic class informatioi call 427-4769. 

Beachers Off To Chowan 



Dana Colleen Smith of 
Ok High Schod and Fre- 
da Lynn Hurdle of Green 
Run have been accepted 
for admissions to Chowan 
Cdlege for the fall semes- 
ter. 

Chowan Cdlege is a 
two-year, coeducational, 
residential cdlege. For 

David Nef f 
Named To 
Dean's List 

David P. Neff of Vir- 
ginia Beach has been 
named to the Dean's List 
at Jacksonville lAiiversity 
for the ^spring 1^2 ses- 
sicm. Tb qualify for this 
hono", students must earn 
a 3.5 ("B") grade pdnt 
average \o( the semester. 

Jacksonville University 
is an independent, coedu- 
cational institution located 
in JadsonviUe, Florida, 
offering 50 undergraduate 
majo's and 14 graduate 
degree prc^rams. 



ON THE AIR AND 
INTHESUN 

WITH DANNY McCLAIN! 




*f 



students wishing to pur- 
sue the baccalaureate de- 
gree in senior cdleges 
and universities. Chowan 
Cdlege offers thorough 
educational c^portunities 
in most professimal fie- 
lds. Students whose for- 
mal educaticm will not 
extend beycxid the assod- 
ate degree can enter the 
w(x-ld of work in business, 
accounting, secretarial 
administratioa (legal and 
medical), merchandising 
management, ncwswriti- 
ng, advertising, printing 
techndogy, photography, 
and conmunicaticm art. 

Qiowan Cdlege has an 
enrdlment of approxima- 
tely 1,150 students repre- 
senting 27 states and 19 
foreign countries. Chow- 
an ofTers opportunities in 
12 professional fields: 
business, English, fine 
arts (music and art), grap- 
hic arts, photography, ^- 
alth and physical educat- 
i<xi, language, mathemat- 
ics, religion and philoso- 
phy, sdence, and social 
science. 



^^^M^^^^^h^&a 



— - - -^^^ 



m 



12 Virginia Beach Sun. August 25, 1982 



School News 



"v. 




Many elementary schools use student safety patrols at the beginning and end of 
each school day to ensure that students load and unload from their buses in a safe 
and orderly fashion. These student safety patrolers from Woodstock Elementary 
were named Number One last year by the Tidewater American Automobile 
Association. 



Bus Driver 
Are Always 
In Demand 



There is a c(»tinuing need for both permanent and 
substitute school bus drivers for Virginia Beach Public 
Schods Iwcause of transfers, retirements, or emergen- 
cies. 

Starting salary for a fiill-time driver fulfilling two 
assignments this year is $ 1 .740 for a ten-month year. A 
fiiU-time driver makes as many as three round-tr^ runs 
(elementary, jimior liigh.iand semor high) each school 
day. Special trips or additionid routes earn extra 
mcmey; liberal Cringe benefits are available. 

Substitutes can earn from $9.S5 to $25 a day, 
depending on how many rmites are driven. 

Hie hours are attractive to nu)thers and/or &thers 
because the drivers leave and arrive hofoe about the 
same time as their children. Also, sdiocl bus drivers 
play an important role in schod activities. 

Requirements for a school bus driver include a good 
driving recOTd, a valid Virginia driver^s license, an 
ability to shift a vehicle's gears, and tluree references. 

Prospective schod bus -drivers receive free complete 
driver training and safety instruction, lliis includes 
classroom and behihd-the-wheel instruction. The 
training period is deterpinded by the individual's 
aptitude. 

Once the training is completed, a driver must pass a 
local written and behindkhe-wheel test, as well as a 
three-part (eye, written, ^aiid driving) Department of 
Motcn* Vehicles test, to j receive the spedal license 
required to drive a schod bus in YxTgima. 

To apply fOT a position as a regular at substitute 
schod bus driver, call , the Mrginia Beach Public 
Schods' Transp<»-tatiqn Department at 428-9388 or 
428-0355. 



#*^ 




^^AaouTMfi 




Author, 
Author! 



Bernard Moore,, a student at libiUiom liukj 
Elementary last year, got the chance to write a NMkj 
about Unuelf, souMthfaig a lot (rf \li<ginte Be)wh 
students will be doing this sdiooi year. 



Contact Schools' Pupil Plr^nel Office For Listings of School Attendance Zones 



Do It Yourself 



In today's econcMny, most famiUes are under more 
pressure than ever to cut costs whenever possible. 

One way homeowners are stretching their siu-inking 
ddlar is with the do-it-yourself approach tohcxne repair 
and improvement. They're discovering the satisfaction 
and cost savings enjoyed by ddng their own insulating, 
electrical and plumbing repair and woodworking. 

Some companies are acutely aware of this trend and 
have made progress in providing instructional aids for 
these activities. One ccnnpany, Shc^smith, Inc., 
provides cme to three woodworking instructions 
sessicms, a three day training course plus local 
woodworking dem(»istrations in shc^ping centers. 

Shopsmith President, John Folkerth, feels that 
almost anycMie can acquire the necessary skills for 
woodworking with a Uttle patience and practice. 
Fdkerth said that "Even if you're a beginner, with the 
right tods, good instructions and some practical 
"hands on" experience, you can go on to increasingly 
complex home improvement projects, even making fine 
furniture and ornate cabinets." 

Infcxmative Shopsmith woodworking demonstrations 
wilt be held locally at the Yukcm Lumber Ccxnpany from 
thursday, August 26 to Saturday, August 28. The 
shows will be given daily, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 
Saturday, 9 a.m- to 2 p.m. with no admissicn charge. 



New students to the 
Virginia Beach schod sys- 
tem or those transferring 



within the city shoij^d 
enrdl as soon as possiUe 
at the elementary, ju: 



higli. or seni«- high schod 
to which their neighbor- 
hood is assigned. Except 



in rare cases, this is 
usually the schod nearest 
the student's residence. 



VIRGINIA BEACH DODGE 

End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 

1982 DODGE 
CONVERTIBLES 





The Pupil Personnel Of- 
fice (427-4791) has a com- 
plete listing of all schod 



attendance zones and can 
answer questims about 
specific neighborhoods. 



^■,'-nt.- % 




^lOOO 

BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 

We have 4 well equipped, low 
mileage executive demonstra- 
tors which must be sold. If 
you've been thinking about 
buying a convertible... 
DONT MISS THIS SALE! 





Who doesn't dream, sometimes? Who doesn't stand gazing 
into the future, picturing that new house, that graduation day, 
that wedding Ceremony, that new car . . . the thousand and one 
dreams that man holds in his heart? 

We realiK that a worthwhile life must conbiin more than just 
material satisfactions. Without a confident frame of mind, our 
future will be nothing but tension and uncertainty. Where can we 
find this inner feeUng of courage that will make things easier for 
uB every hour of every day? 

Millions of people find it in the Christian faith. The apostle 
Paul said that he was strengthened in everything he did by faith t 
Christ . . . and this truth is constatiWy being rediscovered by 
and women urgently in need of somethiiig they can trust. 

Faith is the key to peKe of mind. With faith, you will be 
to move mountains of frustration. 





•Daily Luncheen Specials 
For Call In: 

468-3211 

Oreen Run Square 

Junction, L^sahavoi Pkwy. 
and Holland Road 



Wood Stoves of Vlrgtaihi 

"Silail FUme" Stoves 

Sales-Service-InstalkMimi 

Accestories4ilas(»ry Work 

467-9300 

1512 Parkwiqr Stopping Center 
Virginia Beach 



Ec(MH»my.Uph<^iery 

Today's Fabrics ft Yesterdays 

Prices! 

Hurley Monois, Owner 

483-6747 

5633 ShouUm HUlRoad 
2 Miles Nmth ttfChunMand 



CnstmBCupcl 
AVfaqrlCOmpMOr 

•Cvp^iye^Uiti^m 
•iUmmmts* 

FREEESnMATES 
S4S4545 

ITOTPvkA^WDue 
South Norfolk 



OverUNi'fMMtet 

14l9P«JateiM5tnet 



K-9Expre& 
OfVbgiiilli 

9og FoodDeliveiyServkx 

• Authorized Bmch and 

Field Distributor 

Dog A Cat Supplies 

Save TUm, GasAMoney . 

484-2731 

10K)0-7J0.Kfoo.^at. 

Pu^isvilte Rd. at end 

of Taylor Road 



SoHthport Electric Co. 

Electrical Contractors 

ResidentitdA Cornmerciat 

Service Cha^es..Ncw Wiring 

U(MH*AMMMa>bMqiKr Wwt 

545-3367 

1302Bainbridg<.«vd. 
South Norfdl 



Mm End 
Carpet Shop 

4740 Viiyjiiia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 

^>7-4854 

TityhrB. Carr 
A Employees 



545<««6 

The Ovvtm'tmidEmphye^ 



Ciiarile'gSt^toM 






QyitShoppe • 

•Curtains*Qidlting A Ot^hing 

Material 

•FuU line of supi4jes far 

QwUngAQafti 

"tkmQuae%HmiMy" 

1824 &igfe Ave: 

} Blocks Soudi of 

CoUqe Park ^^ng Ctr : 

and! Block North of 

Billy's &VB.Q. On Btock 

off MQUtary Midway 

420-1715 






'■'"'^ASu 



^■^"^ASUfff 



•^^W VffBilnW 



463-6100 



Scflpluf* Ml»ct « a by Th« Am«rie«n Bible SocOy 



P O. Bm •KN, OwtoMnvWe. Virginia ^906 




TkenHAtolMl 



Ckcnporiw S«i1aii A l4«i 

6CiMvm^mHLeahiMm 
ToSmwTmi 



ailfi^shhRiiiil 















MlltyOMipaqr 

**m«»^H»fttin 

TMeMUvAna" 
€UlMVPlDI,UCMKEa 



n^o 



Virginia BexOi Sun, August 23, 1982 13 



i» 



HOME PLANNING FEATURE 



-A FAN FOR ALL SEASONS 




CdUag fan, kMg 
nowMi^ucdta 



wltli S<Nithav honi^i, are 
Ikroi^OBt tlM nation. Tbey 
CMfijr efficient. 



•iN- 



Ceiling fans are back. And dwy're here to itay, 
according to operts. 

"When cetUng fans were iatoodueed aearfy a 
(xntury ago, they offered a (^We awl 
dable way to drcul^e air tlmni^mit a 
says a spokesman for tbe Ni^ma! 
Association/National Heme Imfitmnm mt Coun- 
cil. "Usually, thou^. tb^ abo were oc^ jmd 
heavy, which nuule Hum lose nn^ <)€ tkeir 
popularity when air condltioBen caoic on the 
scene." 

Because of recent devd^ments In toUd tt^U 
electronics, tl» spokesman iu>tes, ei^ag fiua ut 
enjoying a booming revival. "To4qf*a version 
combines the nostalgia and onaflsi^a^.^f tfw 
past with the technology and amgf'>tttid§alty of 
the present." 

In Uae Every wheie 

Long associated with SouttcriN^k homes piA 
establishments, ceiling fans arc now in vse to eiwy 
part of the country, no matter what a hooM's wt- 
chitectural style. 

"Many fans produced todayr are quiet, i^abie 
and energy efficient," says the NRA/NHIC 
spokesman. "That's why we bdiew tbiy're fotag 
to be around for a long time." 

Some fans have features that save eaer^to all 
seasons. Some cdling fans haw bc^ a via^iride 
speed controland a i^otor reverse swltdi. 



SavcEno^ 

The speed control allows the user to regulate the 
amount of electricity actu^ly used by the fan, 
whidi never uses more than a 100-watt light bulb, 
evm at tc^ speed. 

Tlw motor reverse switch on these cdling fans 
can be set to create a direct breeze in summer and 
an imllrect air flow in winter— which recirculates 
wvm air trapped at the ceiling throughout the 
toom. 

Most ceiling fam are available in a wide range 
of stytes and accessories, are also easy for most 
bomeowno-s to install. > 

Besides being practical, ceiling fans are a 
beautiful addition to any type of family room. 
Ceilliv fans come in several traditional and 
modem styles, ranging from all white to antique 
brass with wahiut blades. When light kits are ad- 
ded, they do double duty as a fan and light fixture 
in one. 

Operate Cheaply 

The heat from the fireplace combined with the 
improved circulation of warm air by the ceiling 
fan may be enough to. keep a family room cozy 
withmit suppkmentanf heat. 

In the summer, ceiling fans provide a cooUng 
breeze that reduces reliance on air conditioning. A 
ceiling fan can be operated at about one-tenth the 
cmt of an average air conditioner. 



The Gridwork Deck 




Why Look Any Birther Than 



Churchkmd 
Hardware Company 

For Your Havtware Needs 




SmPogAarHiURd, 

Portsmouth 

484-3486 

SEE US 

FIRST! 



See YowNHghboisAt 

GREAT BIODGE 
HARDWARE 




101 N.BatOefidd Blvd. 



5470411 



tm 



SUMMER SALE SAVINGS! 



im^Mf'-ltJ- 



NowShopsmifli 

tOJilNl! 




I 




t '■ 



UNITED TIME ONLY,your local 

Shopsmith Honw Workshop 

Center presents free "^ t=' .j^ 

woodworking demonstra- 1 H^ T** Shopsmith MAW V 

tions. Learn how econonn- 1 ^'"^ 

icalitisto: 

• Do home repairs 
and remodeling 
yourself 

• Make durable 
toys for you^ 

children 




• Build and repair fumitura in 
^xjr own workshop 

• Even start your 
ownbusinais 



Stop by and 

learn about , . . 

Suminar 



r^,,M.».-iiHi hill 

anopwinn nc. 

Thi$ promotion is 
brot^M to you by y<HJr 
locM stwpemitli Home 
Workrii^Cm\tm in HorU^ 
Virginia. 

•ShopainNH Inciaea 



Savtaios 

PUIS 

FREE Bonus 

MercHancM0 

— youia 

wWi tba 

purchase of a MARK VI 

Total value — a^mr ^50.00 

FREE Gift Just for attendlngi 

Bring alor>g the coupon betow and claim your FREE 
Shopsmith Wcxxiworking GM after the dwnonttalion 
. . . a handy nrtiter finda/board feel ctfcuMor (R wH 
help you (Werminettie proper angles n ee d e d lor 
pro^sionsri-looiting resulte aid hsip eitnlnsis 
wasted woool PLUSaFREEone-ysv subscript to 
HANDS ON!, the bi-nionthly national woodwRXkiho 
magazine. 



Pmigning and building a room divider made of wood mould- 
ing is a rdatively simple project for the average handyman. 
Tlw tap ot this handsome room divider consists of crown, 
flove nod lattice moulding, the horizontal and vertical 
divider strips are lattice, and the bottom is made of cove, 
baae and base shoe mouldings. The striking rosette panel ef- 
fect at the bottom consists of base and base cap mouldings 
|da«d eiul to end. 



The modator aidti of tUi oaldoor Aedk can be arranged 
la dmereat dUQMs to rnit Buuy oeeito and sites. 

Call it gridwork, parquet or checkerboard. By any 
name, the pattern for a gridwork outdoor deck is mar- 
vdously i^ptable. Based on modular units, it can be 
arranged in differoit shapes to suit many needs and 
sites. 

Here are instructions for the basic square, but you 
can try variations of the design to flt your own needs: 

1 . Lay out the deck on the selected site. 

2. Dig holes for comer posts and set 4 x 4 posts in 
concrete. 

3. Construct 2x6 framing, creating a gridwork on 
which to lay the decking. 

4. Nail decking, alternating the direction of ieach 
square. ^ 

3. Use 2x8 fascia boards for trim. j 

6. Finish with stain or transparent sealer . 

Construction experts at Georgia-Pacific recommend 
you select pressure treated lumber for all your deck 
requirements for a long-lasting, low-maintenance ad- 
dition to your home. Pressure treated lumber is your 
best choice because it has great resistance to decay and 
insects, handsome flnish qualities and workability, and 
it's affordable, too. 

Always check the building code before beginning con- 
struction to be sure you meet its requirements and be 
sure to follow manufacturer's instructions when using 
power tools. 

Divide and Conquer 

Slide rules or calculators are handy tools for solving 
divisiai problems. Another useful device fw reserving, 
a divisiai problem is a room divider. * 
Resolves nroUems 

Its simple, yet decorative elegance works whether 
you intend to separate rooms, break up open spaces, 
screen off certain areas, or direct the flow of traffic. 

Designing and building a room divider is a relatively 
simple project for the average do it yourselfer. The ease 
of its assembly depends on planning, proper tools and 
easy-to-work-^^/ith building materials, such as wood 
mouldings. „ . 

Meet Needs 

Design the room divider to meet your specific needs. 
Keep in mind that it can serve multiple uses. If the 
room is bright and sunny, fOT example, you might 
ccmsider a rotxn divider that doubles as a planter. Let 
your imaginatiOT run free; but keep the project's 
complexity relative to your abflities as a handymafi. 

Once you've settled On a design, list the tools and 
supplies you'll need. A roran divider made of wood 
mouldings requires a miter box, a small, finetoothed 
saw, a hammer, a coping saw and a nail set. CXher 
supplies include a tape measure, glue sandpaper, wood 
filler and paint or stain. 

Decoratiiig Tips 

Wood mouldings are available in a variety of stock 
styles and sizes. A room divider of wood mouldings can 
be stained to bring out the natural beauty of the wood 
or painted to complement room cdws. 




SEE UVE OtMONSTIMnONS DAILY /O-: 

Yukon Lumber Company 

520 W. 22nd Street 

Norfolk, Va. 

JfTtunsday Aug. 26 

thru 

StU., Aug. 28 




ATTENOTHI 



WOOOWOMuHO (Wnrl 

Br no 9w coupon lo ihv ctMnondntOA 

0v«youaFnEE 

and a one-yav aubac^pioniMNt 

nmodwoiking nMQunft HANOeOM. 

byandsMawmsM 
npwation. ThaWsno 



Iwa'i 



Name 

Addtess. 

C«y 

PNmet 



LEAF RELIEF 



PMB SnappMlzM' or 
Baoabig Idt wfhMi you buy 
anyHI-¥Be*< 



Purchase any SNAPPER walk mow- 
er at regular retail price 
and get a FREE Snap- 
perizer, a shrecMer 
Ituit pulverizes Fall 
leaves and debris or 
a FREE Bagging Kit 
to help you clean up this Fall 




FREE Bagging Kit wHh 
tho purchaoo of any 



Purchase any SNAPPER rider at 
regular retail price and get the 
large six bushel Bagging Kit FREE. 
Fall leaves and debris are picked 
up fast. So see your independent 
SNAPPER dealer and get leaf 
relief 
today 







mm 




^z:*"^^^' ^ 



mill. ^fe:. 



.9aie_ 



-Zip, 



l_ 



O I cunwMy owna Shopamlh powsr 

NO PURCHASf NECf SSAHY 



UNJt 



.J 



Industrial Hardware & Supply, Inc. 

(WENTZ) 

4217 Bainbridge Blvd. Chesapeake, Va. 23324 

TELEPHONE: 543-2232 



Front Door 
Gives Entry 
Some Style 

Most people consider two 
for one a pretty fiar 
bargain. A new wood entry 
to replace a shabby front 
door is an example. Not 
only is the attractive ap- 
pearance of a wood door a 
welcome way to greet frien- 
ds when they enter your 
home, it's also a good way ,. 
to say goodbye when they 
leave. 

Replacing a worn out 
front door with a new wood 
entry enhances the ap- 
pearance of a home, in- 
doors and out, and helps 
save energy as well . Nor is it 
costly or difficult for a 
skilled handyman to install. 
A competent do it your- 
selfer can finish such a 
project in a matter of hours 
with ordinary tools. Since 
they can be trimmed to fit 
existing door frames, wood 
doors are particularly suited 
to remodeling. 

Styled to Please 

Available at most home 
cneters and building supply 
dealers, wood entry doors 
come in standard sizes and 
a range of styles from 
traditional to modem. The 
wood can be painted to 
Mend or contrast with other 
a}lor elements, indoors and 
out. Or, they can be stained 
to bring out the delicate 
grain of the wood . 




?ww 



»j» 4. w h.m^^mmm^m 



r* -.-■* 



^mmmm' 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, August 23, 1982 



HOME PLANNING FEATURE 



Lowering Your 
Mid-Season 
Cooling Costs 

Courtesy: Better Business Bureau 



Air conditioning equipment needs maintenance 
during the hot summer months just as heating systems 
need inspection and cleaning during the winter. 
Now— at mid-season— is the time to inspect your air 
conditioning system to make sure it isn't robbing you of 
valuable energy dollars. 

You can do many air conditioning maintenance jobs 
yourself. But, points out the Better Business Bureau, 
there are some duties best left to a professional 
heating/cooling contractor. A malfunctioning conden- 
sor or evaporator is a job for an expert; you can handle 
cleaning and lubrication. 

Mid-summer also is a good time to have a 
heating/cooling professional ready your heating system 
for the winter months ahead, advises the BBB. This time 
of year is usually considered a "slow season" for the 
contractor and you may even vget a discount on service 
by having the contractor put the heating system in order 
now. 

Room or window air conditioners have filters that 
need to be cleaned or replaced regularly. A dirty filter 
can stop the flow of air causing the mechanical parts of 
the machine to wear needlessly and boost the electrical 
requirements of the unit. In most room/window air 
conditioners the filter is located directly in back of the 
air grille on front of the unit. The grille may be held by a 
couple of screws. Or, it may be a friction fit in the 
housing of the air conditioner. 

Remove the grille and the filter. If the filter is 
washable, clean it with regular household detergent and 
water. Rinse the filter thoroughly in clean water. Let the 
filter dry— or pat it dry— and replace it. If the filter is 
the replacable type, buy the same size replacement made 
especially for your model air conditioner. Beware of 
"fit-all" filters. 

Filters in central air conditioners usually are the same 
ones used for heating systems. The cooled air goes 
through the same blower and duct system as heated air. 
These filters should be replaced at least every other 
month during the cooling and heating season. Be sure 
the filter is the right size for the system and replace the 
filter into the unit so the air flow arrows on the edge of 
the filter are in the directio of the air flow. The filter is 
located near the blower of the furnace; it is usually 
covered by a metal plate that's held by screws. The plate 
may be embossed "filter." Some air conditioners have 
filters in the condensor unit that sits on a concrete pad 
outside the house. A metal plate also covers the filter 
slot; the plate is held by screws. 

Thermostats and Lubrication 
Most air conditioning units have factory-sealed 
mechanical parts. However, some models are equipped 
with oil ports in motors and on fan pulley hubs. With 
No. 20 oil, lubricate these parts at the oil ports. Just use 
three to five drops of oil; don't flood the ports. You will 
find the oil ports at the ends of motors and at the base 
of pulley assemblies. 

Make sure there are no obstructions or debris over in- 
take vents of window units and outside condensors. You 
can brush away most debris. If not, use the hose at- 
tachment of a vacuum cleaner to remove it. An outside 
condensor should be level on its support. Check this 
with a cari)enter's level, pushing coarse gravel under the 
pad. with a prybar and shovel for leveling purposes. 
Window units also must be level. Use cedar shingle 
shims for leveling adjustments where the unit rests on 
the window sill and outside brackets. 

Thermostats are an important part of a cooling 
system, and you should set the thermostat at the highest 
comfort level and leave the setting in this position. 
Raising and lowering the thermostat costs lots of energy 
dollars and doesn't really affect the temperature ap- 
preciably. In a heat wave, it's best to maintain just a 15 
to 20 degree difference between outside and inside tem- 
peratures. 

If your cooling equipment hasn't been inspected by a 
professional for a year or more, a maintenance call is 
desirable, advises the BBB. If you are in doubt about a 
service contractor for this job, phone your local BBB 
for a reliability report. 1 

Ordinary Tools 

The ordinary tools for home maintenance and 
improvement can become a costly investment and 
aowd a woilcbench if, everytime a difCvent size 
wrench or screwdriver is requ^ed, another has to be 
IMirchased. Instead, it's eccmomical to buy a size- 
adjustable wTOMch or compact screwdriva or nut- 
driver set with handle and interchangeable bUules. 

Hardware colters have a variety of professiraial- 
quality, multi-use took, designed by manufacturers 
with Uie do-it-youndfo' in mind. There's no Med to 
have something like a four-drawer tool case when 
just a few feet of bench or pegboard wtJl space can 
beoiough. 

For exampk, a Crescent adjusttible wrendi with 
an opemag up to an inch will substitute for as many 
as six double-ended, fixed-sia wrandies...at a han- 
(facMiM saving of money and space. To take the i^aoe 
of fcHir separate oftoi-used file types, thae'% a 
Kichol«}n 4-In-Huid that has both flat and latf- 
Kwnd raq> atd ffle surfaces for only a fractkm of 
the cost. They also make a Ne^ (rf^^ Saira with handle 
and three blades. iiKhKiii^ ke^KM and (XffiqMSS, 
that makes tte handy metal oitting blade a bmus 
i^ien ccmpared to imtividual saw GOMs. 

When it ccmks to scr ewdri v e r s uid con^ivment 
mitdrivas, the averse homeowno- is better off with 
an Xcdite kit of 12 diffo^oit full-sze blades uid 
snap-on huidle, again a awoey savo*. 

Tools are absolute neoa^da to the hooMmna 
who is saving-by-d(Hng. With fewer tocris, saving can 
bei»»i 



85 Percent Woodstove £fjiciency 



Catalytic Stoves Make 
Wood Heating Cheaper 
Safer and Cleaner Now 



The catalytic wood 
stove, a technological 
breakthrough, was ac- 
complished by com- 
bining a catalytic conver- 
ter (similar in concept to 
those used in auto 
exhaust systems) and a 
stove with specially 
designed internal air 
flow paths to provide up 
to 85 percent heating ef- 
ficiency and reduced air 
pollution. 

All across the country, 
homeowners are retur- 
ning to the past to solve 
the uniquely modern 
problem of rapidly rising 
fuel costs. 

To combat high 
energy bills, millions of 
Americans have switched 
back to wood, our oldest 
cource of heating energy. 
Now, thanks to a major 
advancement in wood 
stove design, the trend 
should continue even 
more strongly in the 
1980s. 



That's why catalytic combustion has been trumpeted 
as the first major Innovation in wood burning and why 
wood stove marketers are calling the 1980s the 
"catalytic deoide." { ' 




NEW CATALYTIC WOODSTOVES are available in a wide variety 
of styles including traditional, modern, Early American and Europen. 
Many designs include windows, adding the visual warmth o£ the fire 
to the top efficiency of catalytic combustion. 



A Wood-Burning 
Checklist: 

• Choose a woodburnii^ 
stove, fireplace or fireplace 
insol that has been safety- 
tested by a recognized, 
listed authority. 

• Check local fire and 
building codes for in- 
stallation recommendations 
and clearance standards. 

• Make sure you follow 
manufacturer's instructions 
aiid standards to the letter 
when installing your wood- 
burning stove. 

• Use recommended 
materials to vent your ^- 
pliance. Wood-burning 
stoves and fireplaces 
require a Class A, All-Fuel 
chimney. Be sore chimney is 
properly installed. 

• Do not burn treated 
wood, flammable Ijquids, 
or trash in your appliance. 

• Keep all combustibles 
away from the appliance. 

Have your chimney 




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Virginia Beach Sun, August 23. 1982 15 



Chamber Mews 



Water Deals Are Like A High Stakes Poker Game - Harrison 





J. B. Hantooa, praidait. 



ofViiBbda 



Pulley Named King Neptune 



Ragan BradslUw Pull^, 
prominent insurance 
executive, civic-leader and 
long-time Virginia Beach 
dtizen, has beoi selected 
to serve as King Neptune, 
acomling to Nancy A. 
Creedi, Chairman of the 
1982 Virginia Beach Nep- 
tune Festival. 

"I am honored and 
pleased to save as N^ 
tune IX for • variety of 
reasons" 9tt]my,ji#Lj 
"but primarily becMue I 
'believe the mythd<^ of 
Neptune symbolize the 
true spirit of our dty. 

Wginia Beach had its 
very beginnings from the 
• sea and its growth and 
i- vitality have been dosdy 
I intertwined with the sea 
% and its boimteous gifts to 
g us as Virginia Beach 



dtizens ever since". Pul- 
ley continued. 

Brad, as he is know to 
his many friends and 
associates, is voy positive 
about vir^bda Beadi, and, 
in an ftatCTview this week 
said wje should *'ttop and 
smdl the roses". He n 
quick to point out diitt the 
Neptune Festival is a 
cdeln-ttion of the quality 
of .li£e^ ^^Ofigiir Boidi, 
oail4;flV<f>4|M^4»4»ieilfliit 
opponrtunity Ux residents 
to aM<^ the ooeufront. 

In annouiKing Pulley as 
N9^ne IX, Mrs. Creedi 
o^ the dty to fixtonate to 
have ft dtizai vanSck as 
Brad. His persmial and 
prcrfiessional badLgrmmds 
are b<^ cxtendve and im- 
pressiv*. 



1^ Mike Gooding 
^aStsff Writer 

Time has run out for 
^rginia Beach politidam 
to make a didsion on 
water supply options fra- 
tlM dty, an oqiat on the 
topic told a group of 
businessmai Ittt iraek. 
> "I have studied every 
available piece of 
litaniture on the matter, 
and I have condi^ed that 
we have d^t to 10 years 
bef (»e we literally run out 
of water," said J. Burton 
Harris(m, doirman of the 
Virgtaiia Beadi Chamber 
of ^Commerce's Water 
|y Task Force. "If we 
today implemoi- 
' wato- progra^, 
I'm t^ it would tauce 
dght to 10 years before it 
could be in fun <^)erati(n. 
So, in my mind, our time 
has already run out." 

Harrison was ad- 
dressing the ChambCT of 
Commerce at its moitthly 
Beach Briefs, hdd at Tan- 
dem's Pine Tree Inn on 
Virginia Beach Boule^vrd. 
Harriwn, prerident of the 
Bank of Virginia Beach, 
wu om of a trio of guest 
speakers, whidi also in- 
cluded Durwood S. 
CurUtag, executive direc- 
tor of the SoutheastCTn 
Public Service AutiKnity 
and Aubrey V. Watts, Jr., 
director of of public 
utillities for the dty. 

"This is really a high- 
stakes game of poker," 
Harrison continued. 
"The iH-oblem is, the chips 
these boys are lajnng tm 
the table belong to you 
and me." he said, 
gesturing toward Mayor 
Louis J<»es and several 

, qther ,ii|^M^ o^ City 
Council, including Jack 
Jenninp, Nancy Creech, 
and Harold Hdschober. 

Virginia Beach is 
studying several water 
sui^y (q>tions because its 
current water contract 
with the dty of N<Mrfolk 
ex|»res in 1993. 

Last week, James £. 
R^n, a Richmond lawyer 
representing Virginia 
Beach, told the State 



S 



1 

I 



PHILIP LIEBMAN 

A TTORNEYA TLA W 

THE HERITAGE-ROSEMONT BUILDING 

SUlffe 201 

708 SOUTH ROSEMONT ROAD 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

804-463-4722 




STATE 



1 




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IN 



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•ov 



EXPERIENCED^PROFESSIONAL 
PERSONAL A TTENTION 



Wator Study Conanission 
the dty has the right to 
pump water from the Ap- 
pcMuattox River regardless 
of whether the General 
Assembly passes a statute 
authorizing interbasin 
transfer of wato^. Such a 
step, if l^ally feasible, 
would C(Mt an estimated 
$300 millton to flnance a 
pipdine. 

Negotiations between 
the dty md the AiH>omat- 
tox River Water 
Authority are expected to 
last unUl the end of the 
year. Meanwhile, Virginia 
Beach is also looking at 
the Southrastern Public 
Service Authority's offor 
to pump water from the 
Assamoosick Swamp in 
Western Tidewater. Also 
bdng investigated by the 
dty ^s possible longterm 
water sourc« are Sumer- 
ton Creek and Lake 
Oaston. 

"The Appomattox 
River is really our only op- 
tion." said Watts. "Its 
capacity is 100,000 
^dlons greater than the 
demand of the entire area. 
AU the other options in- 
volve the state of North 
Carolina, and it is always 
difficult to deal with 
another locality." 

Curling defended the 
merits of the Assamoosick 
Swamp. "The water 
quality, as almost any 
chart will tell you, is 
poor," he said. "Other 
sources only get a 'good' 
rating, and there is 
rdatively little 
between 'poor' and 
'good*. The water from 

Assamoosick is going to at The proposed $98.3 

least be good as that which billion tax hike may be'bit- 

we are currently drinking^ ter tasting medicine for 

i from Western &anch." ~"^e business community to 

While Curling and Wat- swallow, but it deserves 




About 200 people attended the "Beadi Briefs" 



members of council have, 
for the most part, 
remained silent on the 
issue. "Anything 1 might 
say could negatively affect 
all of our options," Jones 
recently said. Still, there 
is a hint that a decision 



might soon be finalized. 
"Fear not," councilman 
Bob Jones said last week. 

"The water problem will 
soon be solved with Louis 
Jones taking control." 
The inext Chamber 



Beach Briefs is scheduled 
for September 20. 
Senatorial hopeful. 
Republican Paul S. Trib- 
ble is slated to address the 
group. Spokesman for the 
chamber said an effort 
was being made to invite 



Trible's challenger for the 
Senate seat, Democrat 
Richard J. Davis, to at- 
tend. Reservations are 
necessary, and may be 
made by calling the 
Chamber office at 490- 
1221. 



different NapoHtano Urges Tax Hike Support 



ts debated over the 
r^onal approach versus 
the Appomattox option, 
Harrison called for im- 
mediate action to secure a 
long-range supply of 
water for the city's 
2^,000 residents. 

"When my business 
spends $1 million on a new 
car wash, and then 
Aubrey Watts cuts off the 
water, obviously I've got a 
real problem on my han- 
ds," he said. "The 
pr^lem has been studinT 
aough. From a layman's 
point of view, there is no 
ri^t answer. The time is 
now to make our bet. " 

Mayor Jones and other 



their support because it 
would help resolve the 
"budget crisis" and 
restore public confidence, 
the President of the 
National Association of 
Home Builders said today. 



Fred J. NapoHtano, 
president of NAHB and a 
home builder from 
Virginia Beach urged 
other business grou[% to 
join NAHB in setting 
aside their own special in- 
terest and in supporting a 
tax bill that is in the 
"public interest". 

"Nobody wants to raise 
business taxes during a 



recession, but consider the 
alternatives," Napolitano 
said. "Without some ad- 
ditional tax revenue and 
further reductions in 
spending in all areas of the 
budget, the deficit could 
total more than a half 
trillion dollars over the 
next three years. Credit to 
finance business and con- 
sumer spending would 
remain in short supply, 
and interest rates, par- 
ticularly long term mor- 
tgage rates, would remain 
perched at near record 
levels." 



Napolitano noted that 
this was not a typical 
recession. "The economy 
is bdng pushed to the cliff 
by interest rates, and some 
basic policy adjustments 



are required to bring down 
interest rates," he said. 
"Passage of this tax bill is 
one of than."' 

In addition to the tax 
increase and some ad- 
ditional spending cuts, 
Napolitano urged the 



Federal Reserve Board to 
loosen its tight grip on the 
nation's money supply. 
"Money is too tight to 
permit a lasting decline in 
interest rates and any 
sustainable period of real 
economic growth . " 



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Oceanside Lions Action 



The Oceanside Lions Qub will participate in the 
Lions of \%-ginia Hearing Foundation and Temporal 
Bone Bank Days August 27 & 28. Members will be at 
the Las kin Road Shopping Center, Hilltop Haza 
Sh(9ping Center and The Level Green Boulevard 
Shopping Center in College Park. 

This non-profit organization is spcxisOTed by the 
Lions Qubs of Wginia in cooperation with the 
University of Virginia Medical Center, The Deafness 
Research Foundation, and The American Academy of 
Otdaryngdogy. 

Proceeds firom these Hearing Day Activities are used 
to initiate and sufqxrt research on hearing and 
deafness problems, transplants of middle ear bones to 
restore partial or complete hearing, ear examinaticms, 
hearing aids and molds. 

hi addition, the numbers of the Oceanside Lions' 
Qub will be soliciting the general public to sign 
Temporal Boik Donor cards. The Temporal Bone is the 
middle ear structure and is used to restore hearing to 
individuals. 

The lions Qub would also appreciate donations of 
any used hearing aids along vrith the necessary hearing 
aide mold and hearing examination are furnished to the 
needy at no cost. 

Plea/e say "Yes" to the most cherished gift - a gift of 
hearing. Hearing - our nuxt precious sense. 




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"wi^f^r^p^iF^B- 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, August 2S. 1982 

City Council 




$30.000 From Sheik 



Council Confused Over Gift 



in, 
■Sfi 



Mayor Lows Jones Congratulates Charles BIy 

Bly Honored For 40 Years of Service 



Virginia Beach City Council recently presented Mr. 

^i Charles B. Bly with a "resduticm in Recogniti(m" for 

j^v his 40 years of service to the Qty of Virginia Beach. Bly 

is a Motor Equipment Operator II in the Department of 

General Services, Beautificatioi Division. 

In the resolutiMi presented to Mr. Bly by Mtyor 



Louis R. Jones, Bly was described as a "reliable, 
trustworthy, dependable, self-motivated and dedicated 
worker, who sets an outstanding example for any city 
employee". 

Bly was employed by the Qty of Virginia Beach on 
July 19,. 1942. 



I Hospital Wants Money ^''br Babies 



Mr 






Virginia Beach Qty 
Council plans to ask State 
Health Commissioner Dr. 
James B. Kenley to re- 
consider the applicaticHi of 
Virginia Beach General 
Hospital for a maternity 
care unit. 

Councilman Robert 



Jones said the application 
had been approved at 
every level until it got to 
Kenley. At an informal 
meeting of Council Mon- 
day evening, he said that 
there is "an apparent lack 
of appreciation for the 
growth dynamics of our 
city." 

»r " ^ 



Mayor Louis Jones inst- 
ructed City Attorney Dale 
Bimson to pepare a reso- 
lution asking Kenley to 
reconsider. 

Councilman R. Jone 
said that a two-year stud> 
was made before the hos 
pital decided to submit a- 
application and that th 



situation is more serious 
now than it was when the 
study was begun. He 
explained that Norfolk 
General Hospital will not 
accept any more indigent 
maternity cases from the 
Beach. That means 30 
births a month at Virginia 
Beach General. • :, 



ByLeeCaUU 
SunRcpmlcr 
ScHne Virginia Beach citizens fiave reservations about 
accepting gifts ($30,000) from a foreign sheik, 
according to Councibnan Jack Jennings. 

He said that he has been receiving oills from citizens 
to that effect. One woman said, "Beware of Arabs 
bearing gifts," Jennings said, "and then she 
laughed." At an informal meeting of Virginia Beach 
Gty Coupcil Mcmday evening, Jennings said that the 
people have expressed concern, biU he didn't say 
exactly why. 

Prince Mcdiammad Al-Fassi, of Saudi Arabia who has 
an interest in the Pavilion Towers, recently presented 
the city with $30,000, $10,000 of which he designated 
for the Marine Science Museum and the other $20,000 
be given to the Parks and Recreation Department. 

Jennings said, however, that "a number of 
residents" had expressed some concern over the, gift 
and asked that Council consider some policy on "gifts 
which seem to come out of nowhere." He said he was 
reluctant to receive such gifts no nutter where they, 
come from, but that if the city had to accept them, the 
grant ofUce should decide where the gift should go. He 
said he had "strcmg reservations" about placing the 
money in the general ftmd. 

Councihnan Robert Jones said he wasn't sure what 
the prd7lem is. "If Mrs. Smith dies and leaves money 
in her will to the city. . ." 

"I'm not talking about Mrs. Smith dying," Jennings 
said. "I'm talking about an Arabian prince." 

Councihnan John A. Baimi seemed to think the 
discussion was academic because "we don't get gifts 
that often." 

"I doa't know what people are thinking," Mayor 
Jones said, "but there are no strings attached." 

Councihnan Hardd Heisdiober remarked that the 
normal procedure was to pass a resolution accepting a 
grant which could be duplicated in accepting a gift. 

Muehlenbeck said that there was a difference 
between a grant which is sought by the «ity and a gift 
and that passing resdutions on various gifts may not be 
the best posicy. 

Jennings mentitmed the "general propriety" of such 
a gift. 

Mayor Jones said pouncil endorses resolutions on 
grant applications, not accepting thjpm. 

Baum said the prince apparently makes a habit of 
doing this in any city he goes to, and that it might be 
the way things are done where he comes from. "We're 
not obligated." 

Councihnan W. H. Kitchin III said he agreed with 
Jennings. "It doesn't seem dignified to me (to give 
gifts in this manner) and it doesn't seem dignified to 



me to accept." 

CouncUwoman Nancy Qeech said the Council would 
be criticized either way. 

OMndhvoman Meyera CXKimdctf said that in this 
country "we're cautious about gifts condng to 
government regulariy because the dicumstaiMes tend 
to look a little slody or doudy." 

She said that maybe the best answer would be to 
write a letter to the prince asUng him to give directly to 
organizations such m King's Otusbten Hospital, the 
Art Museum, the Sdenoe Museins. The gifts could be 
made directly and not thnx^ the dty. 

Mayor Jones ^plied, "I think it would be very rude 
to the man." 

Councilman Jones said his only concern was giving 
the money to Puts and Itecreiuion and questioned 
whether there are other agencies for youth where the 
money could go. "^ 

Meuhlenbeck said the dty could advertise for 
proposals which could be reviewed by tlw grants ofBce. 

Heischober said then that Council could endorse a 
resdution to accept the money and then endorse a 
resdution oa where it should go. He specified the 
money for youth should go to non-profit gtoap» which 
are not city agendes. 

Jennings will work on dty Attorney Dale Bhnson on 
a policy on accepting gifts while Muehlenbeck is 
expected to return with a list of beneficiaries for the 
$20,000 gift for youth. 



Clean As You 
Can Get 

Commercial & Residential Cleaning 
One Time or by Contrkict 

340-4718 
428-4291 
340-0236 

tbOatKUnms 

274ItaiiitreeEo«d 
VaBach.VA234S2 




Oberndorf , Henley 
To Municipal League 



City Employees Hbriored 







Vice MayOT Barbara 
Henley and Councilwo- 
man Meyera Oberndo-f 
have been appointed vot- 
ing delegate and alternate 
respectively to the 1982 
Municipal League Ccm- 
venticai in Virginia Beach 
, next Monday and Tues- 
day. 

Council approved the 
appointments Monday- 



aty Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck said the es- 
timated tax revenue to the 
city from the convention 
wiU be $6,875. 

evening and also appro- 
priated $15,000, as host, 
for the dinner, band and 
site preparation and the 
traditional hospitality 
suite in the main hotel. 



Six Virginia Beach city 
employees have received 
their Professional Engine- 
ers designation from the 
State of Virginia. 

They are Richard H. 
Elliott frwn the Public 
Works Department and 
James C. l5aws(Mi, Eileen 



Leininger, Vir G. Madero, 
Jeffrey S. Waller and 
Henry C. Watson from the 
Public Utilities Depart- 
ment. 

Their achievements 
were recognized by Qty 
Council Monday afterncH 
on. 



Ballet Registration Set 



Trolley Builders 



The ODU/Va. Beach 
Ballet will hdd registrat- " 
ion for the Fall semester 
of August 27 and 30 frc«n 
10 a.m. to noon and from 
3-7 p.m. bmh days. 



The 16 week semester 
begins August 30 and 
ends December 17. 

For more information 
on classes and schedules, 
call 440-4486. 



Speak WeU? 

"How to Be An Effec- 
tive Public Speaker" is the 
topic of a free lecture by a 
faculty member from the 
Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community 
College on Tuesday, Aug. 
31, at Virginia Beach 
General Hospital. 

The lecture, open to the 
public, will take place at 
12:10 p.m. in the 
Hospital's Health 
Education Activity Cen- 
ter. It is the last in a 
"Food for Thought" 
scries, co-sponsored by 
TCC and the hospital. 



^^MMIi 



A trolley terminal for 
Virginia Beach's four tro 
-Hey buses will be built by 
Lockwood Buildings, Inc. 
for $187,271. 

Lockwood, the low bid- 



der of eight, was awarded 
the c(Mitract to build the 
40-by-l 5 1-foot metal bui- 
lding by City Council Mo- 
nday evening. 



Budget Status Reports 



The first of what wiU be 
:]uarterly status reports 
cm the Capital Budget 
shows 233 projects and 
their various stages of 
conpletioi. 

The repOTt, for the per- 



iod ending June 30, p > 
vides a ready reference 
for the $312,960,527 in 
capital projects, indicat- 
ing estimated costs, ex- 
penditures to date, balan- 
ces and stage of activity. 



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I SPECIALIZE IN MARKETING AND ADVERTISING 

AD VICE TO SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZED COMPANIES. 

IF YOU NEED HELP ON YOUR MARKETING STRA TEG Y 

AND ADVERTISING PROGRAM, CALL ME AND 

LETS TALK. 



Lawrence M. Raines, Jr. M.B.A. 

CONSULTANT 

(804)463-3327 



J 



GEORGIANS 
HAIRSTYLES 



488-3440 

OohH MlM Vour Smp' 
On Calor TVf 



INTRODUCTORY FREE FACIAL | 

MNCll hNI MHNI ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^1 1^ ^g ^ |H MM 

I Haircut & I 



SKIM CAM MMMAMM 

CMferAM*- 

|Ba»»30 ... ^7"* I 
' ind CUit. now Orv or SM 2 

jiwiMWw e**W I 



Blowr Ory . . H.tO | 
Harctit .... •B.M) | 
Military I 

Cut •3.IHI I 

Shwnpoo & I 

Set ...... •«.«l I 

Haircut & I 

Set ^.00 i 



Friday Bozor 




Tidewater *s Only Store Carrying A C^m^^eteUne Of 

Inqported Mlddie Emt Foo^ 

SPICES, CHEESE, CANNED GOODS AND MORE FROM 
LEBANON. EGYPT. GREECE. PAKISTAN. AND PERSIA 



OPEN 
DAILY 



lExnmS^. II 



iasim*% u> M)C*^«N»»I 



HoiMa Tuca MAO, mi i(mim«) io-k sat ».s 



'rand Opening 
^Special 

ALL »ICE8 Se^ BEUMV 

t Super MAHotT] 



PHONE 

804 
497-^11 



S33 Newtown Rd. at Lake Edward Dnve-Sidte 119 
rirgtnia Beach, Va. 234ffif 



^ginu BeKli Sun, Ai«iist 25, 19^ 17 




Library Employees Are JackS'Of- All-trades 



HolHMk^ 



Swn Gete Results 



nu DalHMky, president 
^ D ft D Marketing 
displays the copies of the 
Viiginla Bcadi Sim avd 
the Oiesapeake Post that 
canled his dk|day adver- 
ttahig. 

The advertisements re- 
sulted in a significant 



reader-respoBse which 
prompted Dnhosky to 
comment that "These re- 
sults surpass aE my Tide- 
water advertising cam- 
paigns (rf tlw past." 

For more Information 
caU 547-4571 or 4M-3430. 



Library 
SUHIinet 



^Vta^da Beach 



DwM 




The authors of this coliunn thought it might 
be inf onnative to occasionally use this sp£u:e to 
spotlight the hard working, dedicated em- 
ployees of the Virginia Beach Public Library. 
We have decided to begin our tour of local 
libraries at the Oceanfront Area Library. 

The Oceanfront Area Library is the city's 
oldest public library, predating the merger of 
dty and country in 1963. Today the agency is 
hous^ in the newest building in the system. 
The modem, 8,000 square foot facility, con- 
structed around a garden-like atrium, acts as 
the primary library service point for residmts 
of and visitors to the Oceanfront area. A staff 
of seven full-time, six part-time employees, 
two special employees, plus numerous volun- 
teers, facilitate the circulation of over 170,000 
items and answer some 75,000 questions each 
year. 

Supervising this industrious crew is Lloyd, 
Waller. Waller oversses the day-to-day 
operations.of the library and insures that both 
staff and procedures work as smoothly as 



possible and comes up with solutions when 
they don't. Her expertise enables all the fun- 
ctions of the library to come together, 
resulting in quality library service. 

Any one wh has attoided a chUdrra's 
storytime, a Virginia Opera Association 
prev^w, or any one of tiM many adult and 
children's programs offered at tte library 
usually have Gale Thrift or Rosemary 
Houseknecht to thank. Thrift's rapp<nt with 
children, her knowledge of the juvenile collec- 
tion and her ability to produced a whiz-bang 
^ufipet show make her a valuable resource. 
Likewise, Houseknecht's imagination, her 
community contacts and her willingness to 
'"try anything once" have r«ulted in quality 
adult programs. 

Since most library visitors eventually end up 
seeking help at the Information Desk, the 
Oceanfront Area Library is fortunate to have 
such employees as Kitty Price, Diane Smithson 
and Denise Alkn staffing that desk. We have 
always thought they should have become 
detectives rather than Library Assistants. If 
you have a question that needs answering, you 
couldn't find better sleuths than this group. 

Although most library employees are 
required to be jack-of-all-trades, no one fits 
this bill better than Kathy Pawlak.? She is not 
only in charge of the magazines, she m ai nt a in s 
the Com Catalog, plus fills hundreds of reser- 



ve x«)u^ts «u^ week. Wow! 

Not all tlK work in the library occurs at tl» 
front desk. Deborah Stacey, the library's 
secretary, is responsible for tasks ranging ttom, 
recording the daily statistics to i^'OMssing 
ova-dues. It is a big job whi(^ she haiuUes un- 
pre^vely, npedally since she works part- 
time. 

The list of library jobs goes on and mi. 
Melissa Emerson, Jean Carder and Marie Jen- 
nings are our library pag^. They are respon- 
sible for reshdving a never-ending flow of 
books, maga7in<» and tecoi6&. Alice Goode, 
who is actually employed through a SEVAMP 
grant, always has a ready smile as she checks 
itons in aiul out at the CSrculation Desk. 
Finally, there is David Smith, employed 
through the area's STTOP program. He has 
such a gentle manner that beach goers are 
never offended when they are asked to move 
their car from the library parking lot. 

The Oceanfr(Hit staff is a lively, dedicated 
group of employees doing a hundred aiul one 
jobs, all to provide the best possible library 
service. We haven't begun to touch on the 
whole range of their duties, nor have we men.- 
tioned our volunteers, but they dtsent a 
colunm to themselves. 

If you would like to get to know the library 
staff ,and their duties, why not stop in a get 
acquainted. 



i^. 



COG In Reward Money 



Crini* $9lxt(! 



l«ie»»v 




demanded her money and her purse. As she 
attempted to drive away, she was shot in the 
back through the car window. The first 
suspect was described as a white male, 17-25 
years old, 5'-0", with blond hair and a round 
face. The second-suspect was a white male, 17- 
25, 5*-07", thin build with long red hair and 
jxissibry hiad a mustache. 

Shortly before they were shot, both victims 
observed a black late model mercury capri or 



Fofd Mustang with a 1" wide red str^ runnmg 
around the body, a spoiler attached to its 
truck, louver covering the read window and 
mag-style wheels, pull into the lot and leave on 
sevo-al occasions. 

The type weapon that is believed to have 
been used in both shooting is a .234 Win- 
chester or Browning rifle with a silver 15" - 
18" b^ell, bolt Action wth possibly a^t- 
down stock. « 



Crime solvers needs you to call 427-0000 if 
you have any information about these sai- 
seless shootings. If yoiu: information leads to 
an arrest or indictment, you will be eligibk fot 
this $4,000 cash reward. 

Virginia Be»:h Crime Solvers will also pay 
up to $1,000 in cash for mformation about 
any crime, wanted person or the recovery of 
drugs or stolen property. Your name wili 
never be.required to collect the cash rewards. 



Virginia Beach crime solvers is offering a 
$1,000 cash reward in an effort to solve two 
shooting incidents which ^cmred in Virginia 
Beach on June 26, 1982. AdditionaUy, the 
Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star is offering _ 

$2,500 and the Navy Soundings newspaper 24-HOUr 
$500 for these same crimes. ri i? J 

On that Saturday at approximately 1:40 J^eaiOOu 
A.M., a 17 year oild white male was parked in 
the parking lot at 5291 Greenwich Road with 
his girlfriend when a bullet was fired through 
the front of his vehicle and struck the youth. 
After being shot, he droVe home and the 
rescue squad was summoned. 

Approximately 15 minutes later, a 55 year 
old female newspaper carrier, along with her 
daughter, arrived at the same parking lot to 
pick up newspapers for the morning route. 
Shortly after arriving, the woman stated that 
two white males approached her vehicle and 



City May Save Funds 



Line 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of 

Agriculture/Cooperative 
Extension Service is of- 
faing a 24-hour Seafood 
Tipline. Topics include 
such items as outdoor 
cookery of seafood, tips 
on buying crab meat, 
cleaning soft shell crabs, 
etc. 



Seafood Tips 



The Virginia Beach 
Cooperative Extension 
^Smnsb hai just inlMcil • 
new and ccdting snvice 
for the seafood lover. 
Through ipecial - funds 
fron^ Virginia i^Stjrte 
University and the 
assistants of the Food 
Sdous aiul Technolt^ 
jDqMTtn^M «f Vfl «nd 
1^ a Seafood Tq^ine is. 
available 24 hours, every 
day witih % *ttps on 
"evoythiag you f^r wan- 
ted to kiiow about 
Seafood". TWs months 
topics will iiK;la^' 

• Outdo<M- finsfcoT # 
Seafbod fi 

• So yw waM to catch 

• SmolAs ^h U easy 
andftin. 

• Seafocxl iata^ vt 
coolanddMcicws 

»a^ 

• Exdtii^ 'Mfft to «»« 
loftsMla'ahi . 

• CooUm 1^ a«^ to 
d^dow 

• Up <m Mying ow 

tueA 
Tm^ ■« dum^ on 

So start a to@d iM^t mw; 
call 427-fS3l regularly 



and gain hdpful infcM'- 
mation as well as r«apes 
lor ail types of seafood. 



The tipline niunber is 
427-9533. Call regularly 
and gain hdpful infor- 
mation as well as redpes 
for aU typM of seafood. 
Topi<s are changed on 
McHi^ys and Thursdays. 



1.P JR. FAMttCS 

ALTERATIONS AND SEWING 




WE BUY, SELL & TRADE 
ANY BABY ITEMS 

BABY FURNirUWE, CLOtHING, 

TO YS AND ACX:i^CMUK 

N^VANDUSED 

MANYVIWERSIO 

''Come In Today!'' 

1%% TmMSXLhXS. SHOPPING CtNTTO 



The dty may save 
S9.067 under a lease/pur- 
chase agreement for equ- 
ipment for the Depart- 
ment outright for 
$355,774. 

The funds can be inve- 
sted in U. S. Treasury 
bills at 13.4 percent while 
the annual rate of pay- 
ment to tte low bidder. 
Southern National Leas- 
ing Corporatian will be 



12.3 percent leading to a 
potential savings of 
$9,067, according to Qty 
Manager Thomas H. Mu- 
ehlenbeck. 

Council Monday even- 
ing awarded the contrad 
for the 35 aibic-yard, 
off-the-road truck and a 
compador for the landfill 
to Southern National Lea- 
sing Corporation, the low 
bidder tA five. 



To Subscribe To The 

VirgiaU Beach Sun 
I^ase fiB <mt ttds dknt fcHin with your 
dieckormon^cmtoandmailto: ^ 

THE VIRGINIA lEACH SUN 



13«l 

Vfarginfail 



tRoad 

I, Va., 23452 



NAME. 



ADDRESS.. 

CTTY 

STATE__ 
taONE. 



.ZDP- 



WTTHIN TTOEW ATER AREA 

DO»Yaar*».«t 
DTmYcmlSJS 

ALL Oram AREAS 

aOMYcar*U.M 

viMASE oBtcx mssatf tUs is 

!«BewfabMr^MoB 

nxASE cmoL vxmnn yoa 

«« Mw rccdfliw 1^ VOMSINIA 
I UM» SUN Mri lie racwta^ year 




Welcome 

To The 
World 

Of 

Tuff 

Stuff..: 

. . . where the warmth of wood and fine 
craftsmanship coupled with functional, yet 
elegant design provide the best value for 

furniture for your home or off ice, 

TtiffStirff furniture is designed to last and last. 

First, it is made from the finest grade of 

sturdy yellow pine available. Also, anytime 

you choose, you can change your entire 

living fk)om decor by simply recovering 

your cushions. Dollar for dollar, tuff Stuff 

is your best buy in furniture in Tidewater. 

We have many imitators, but no one can 

hold a candle to Ti{ffSttrff We me confident 

that you will enjoy the quality and good 

looks of our furniture. Once you enter the^ 

world of Tuff Stuff it will be a lifelong 

experience. Thank you! 



Timberlake 
Shopping Center 

Holland Rd. 



Virginia Beach 
495-3765 



^^i^pi"^ 



imim' 



^^pa*" 



^^^HVi 



mmfmm^mm^mt 



mmmmm 



mmummmmm^mmmm^^t^f^mmm 



\% Virginia Beach Sun, August 25, 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



PubRc HMring 



] 



D 



NMic HMring 



157-12 2T 8/25 VB 



Virginia: 



CHANGE OF 

CLASSIFICATION: 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning ^peals withh 
craiduct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, September 1, 
1982, at 7:30 P.M., in the Council Chambers of the Qty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, A%ginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 7:00 P.M. in the 
Gty Manager's Qmference Room. The foUowing 
applications will appear on the agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Joseph F. Nagy requests a variance to allow parking 
of maJOT recreatioial equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest pcHtion of a building 

« adjacent to a public street on Lot 190, Section 2, Kings 
Grant, 605 Kings Grant Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. Chris t(q}her Develc^ment Company requests a 
variance of 10 feet to a 20 foot front yard setback 
instead of 30 feet as required on Lot 6, Block A, Phase 
5-B, Lake Christc^her, 5109 Park Lake Court. 
Kempsville Borough. 

3. J. E. Hurst J<»ies requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required frcHit yard setback on Lot 10, 
Section 7, Part 2, Kings Grant, 808 Arrow Qrcle. 
Lynnhaven Bo-ough. 

4. LBR, fcxmerly Multinaticmal, Inc. requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 7 foot side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 10 feet as required and to allow parking 
in a required setback where prdiibited when a 

; conmercial zoning district adjdns an apartment district 
(west side) on Site A and B, Birdneck Area, Laskm 
Road. Lynnhaven Bo-ough. 

5. The Franciscus Co., Inc. requests a variance of 3.5 
feet to a 26.5 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet 
as required (second siacy deck) aa Lot 10. Block 19, 
Croatan Beach, 602 Vanderbilt Avenue. I^rnnhaven 
Borough. . , , 

6. James B. Dadscm requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback (ncxth side) instead of 10 feet as 
required and of 5 feet to a 1 5 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (Carribbean Avenue) instead of 20 feet as 
required (swimming pod oa Lots 37 and 39) and of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in required front yard setbacks (both 
Greensboro Avenue and Goldsb(»-o Avenue) and of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a 
street (Carribbean Avenue) and to allow the 6 foot fence 
to encroach into the visibility triangle at the intersection 
of Golds boro and Carribbean Avenues instead of a 
fence 30 inches in height as allowed on Lot 37, 38, 39 
and 40, Block 42, Shadowlawn Heights, 103 Carribbean 
Avenue and Golds boro Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

7. John and Jeanne A. Barfield request a variance of 2 
feet to a 3 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 
5 feet as required and of 7 feet to a 3 foot rear yuxi 
setback instead of 10 feet as required (accessory 
building - shed) (m Lot 10, Block 1, Section 17, Princess 
Anne Plaza, 737 Fwest Trail. Princess Anne Borough. 

8. Thomas D. Tuite requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a street 
(Bayberry Street) on Lot 130, Plat No. 1, Cape Story by 
the Sea, 2625 Poinciana Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

9. Charles and Helen Howard request a variance of 12 
feet to an 18 foot front yard setback (Presidential 
Boulevard) instead of 30 feet as required (swinuning 
pool) on Lot 7, Block E, Windsor Oaks, 3621 Stepping 
Stone Lane. Kempsville Borough. 

10. Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses by James T. 
Hinkle, Trustee, requests a variance of 2.07 acres of 
land area to .93 acres of land instead of 3 acres of land 
area as required fcH- a church on Lots 1, 2, 3, 14 & IS, 
Block 5, Booker Washingtcxi Park, 228 Pritchard Road. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

1 1 . Harry J. Tennien requests a variance of 6 feet to a 9 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Jeanne Street) 
instead of 15 feet as required (steps and deck) and of 6 
feet in fence height to a 10 foot fence instead of a 4 foot 
fence as allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a 
street (Jeanne Street) on Lot 1, Block 40, Section R, 
Pembroke Manw, 400 Betsy Ross Road. Bayside 
Borough. * 

12. Leona S. Reynolds reqiMsts a variance of 2.5 feet to 
a 5.5 foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 8 feet 
as required (stoc^ and steps) on Lot 18, Block 4, Sectioo 
E, Cape Henry, 221 and 223 72nd Street. Lynnhaven 
Bo-ough. 

13. Tommy Gibbs requests a variance of 9 feet to a 1 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(accessory building - storage shed) on Lot 383, Section 
S, Lago Mar, 1005 Granada Court. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

14. E. A. Smith requests a variance of ^ feet to a "O" 
rear yard setback (south property line) instead ct 20 
feet as required (boathouse - room addition) on Lot 109, 
Qub Section, Birdneck Point, 1329 Cbewink Court. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Daniel E. a«l Eve^ S. Conroll reqt^t a wiaace 
of 10 feet to a 5 foot sicte yard setb^dc (west side) and of 
3 feet to a 10 foot rear yuA setback (north sMe) instead 
of 15 feet each as required (swimming pooO on Lot 10, 
Section 2. Part 1, Baydiff, 1337 Baydiff Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. Sue B. Myers requests a varHUce d 7 feet in 
building telght to 42 feet insteul ttf 3S feet in buiMing 
height as allowed (third floor aditition) on Lou 3 ami 4. 
Block 3. New Virginia Beach Corpoi^ian, 6000 
Oceanfront Avenue. Lynnba^n Boroi^k. 

17, Troy WaUace requests a variance of5l»t tea 3 BAYSU« BOROUGH: 



foot rear yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pod) (xi Lot 64, Block B, Section 2, 
Cedar Ifitt, 5716 Aspen Ehive. KempsvUle B(»^(xigh. 



W. L Towers 
Secretary 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 



The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, Septem- 
ber 13, 1982, at 2:00 P.M., at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 



ZONING 



DISTRICT 



VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

1. 

An Ordinance upon Application of C. L. Fisher for a 
Change of Zoning District Classification from R-7 
Residential District to A-1 Apartment District on the 
Southeast corner of 27th Street and Baltic Avenue, Lots 
26, 28, 30, 32, Block 97, Virginia Beach Development 
Co. Parcel located at 2611 Baltic Avenue and contains 
16,800 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 



m 



KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

2. , :r -- r: -^'^:- --^ ■■) ••. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Hunt Contracting 
Co., Inc., for a Change of Zoning District 
Classiflcation to a PD-H 2 Overlay on certain property 
located on the North side of Parliament Drive beginning 
at a point 4(X) feet more or less West of Yoder Lane, 
running a distance of 600 feet more or less along the 
North side of Parliament Drive, running a distance of 
72.47 feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 
63.43 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 
513.21 feet along the Western property line, running a 
distance of 693.15 feet along ther Northern peroperty 
line and nmning a distance of 838.69 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said parcel contains 1 1 .2 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. ' ""' 

An Ordinance upon Application of Clifton N. and Bar- 
bara A. Holmquist and Kenneth D. and Kathleen S. 
Barefoot for a Change of Zoning District Classification 
from R-6 Residential District to B-1 Business- 
Residential District on property located on the East side 
of Kempsville Road beginning at a point 1000 feet more 
or less South of Indian River Road, running a distance 
of 195.17 feet along the West side of Kempsville Road, 
running a distance (tf 359.53 feet along the^ Southern 
property line, running a distance of 184.78 feet along 
the Eastern property line and running a distance of ^ 
398.09 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 1 .59 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

4. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Oxford Develop- 
ment Corporation for a Change of Zoning EHstrict 
Classification from A-1 Apartment District to A-2 
Apartment District on Lots 1 thru 12, Block 7, Lots 6 
thru 29, Block 8, Lots 6 thru 34, Block 9, Lots 1 thru 34, 
Block 10 and Lots 13 thru 17, Block II, Plat of Midway. 
Said parcels are located between First Street and 
Second Street, West of Thalia Trace Drive and contain 
8.64 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

S. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Oxford Develop- 
ment Corporation for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from B-2 Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on Lots 1 thru 32. Block 2, Lots 
1 thru 32, Block 4, lots 1 thru 32, Block 5, Lots 1 thru 
10 and Lote 14 thru 19, Block 6, Plat of Midway. Said 
parcels are located between Bonney Road and First 
Street. West of ThaliaTraw Drive and contain MSKl 
acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROWpf^. j. 

An Ordinance upon Application of John A. Vaughan, 
Jr., for a Change of Zoning District Classification from 
R-8 Residential District to 0-1 Office District on Lots 1, 
2, 3, 4, and a portion of Parcel A, Block 9, Thalia 
Village. Property is located at 4356 Bonny Rmid and 
contains 2.261 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 



An Ordinance upon Application of Colonial Baptist 
Church for a Conditional Use Permit for a church on 
CCTtain iM^operty located on the West side of Centerville 
Turnpike beginning at a point 1000 feet more or less 
South of Lynnhaven Parkway, running a distance of 
1060 feet more or tess alcMig tlM West side of Caito^oUe 
Turnpike* runidng a distance of 870 feet along the 
Southern j^opoty Um. running a distance of 40S feet 
along the Weston ivoperty Uik and running a distance 
of 645 fe^ aloiv the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel cMitains 10 a«»s. KEMPSVILLE KIROUGH. 



An C^dinanoe iip<» Ajqriki^on of Level Green Bairttst 
Church tm a Cooditional Uw Permit for an a&ttttmi to 
an existiiv (Aurc^ on tte Souttout side of Uvei Green 
Bouleiwd b^lnnii^ at a p<^t 90 feet Northeot of 
CSotf ^ffjn^ Road, mnnlng a distance of 272.67 feet 
akng tlM S<MitlKast side of Level Oreoi Bod^rard, 
mnmng a distaiKe of 

1^.75 feet in a Southeista-ty directitm, rum^ a 
<tettti« of 453.03 fe^ in a Seemly directlmi, ruuni^ 
a ^tMSCt of 40 fe^ in a StMt^^^ry ^ce^» ok! 
nun^i a ^tfaace of S41.3I feet in a Nott hwwlirly 
«^dkM. SiM iMTcel is loo^d at 5869 Levd Gscm 
Boote^rd mA oMains 2.3 maet. KEMI^VILLE 
BOROUGH. 



An Ordinance upon Application of C. Gordon Oliver 
for a Conditional Use Permit for a self-service gasoline 
station and car wash facility on property located on the 
South side of Haygood Road beginning at a point 150 
feet East of Aragona Boulevard, running a distance of 
150 feet along the South side of Haygood Road, run- 
ning a distance of 250 feet along the Eastern property 
line, running a, distance of 150 feet along the Southern 
property line uid running a distance of 250 feet along 
the Western property line. Said parcel contains 37,500 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

10. 

An Ordinance upon Application of Ani^ Polon for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a home occupation 
(babysitting) on site 7, Lot 6, Pembroke Shores 
Townhouses, Section One. Property is located at 45(X) 
St. John Court and contains 4639 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 



Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Dqjartmrat of PUuuing. 

All interested persons aire invited to attend. ' 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

atyOerk 

159-8 2T 9/1 VB 






PiMcAiictiMn 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take notice that on Sep- 
tember 3, 1982 lU 10:00 
A.M. at the pranises of 
Tidewater Imports, Inc., 
DBA Hall Pontic GMC 
Honda, Inc., 3152 
Mrginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23452, the undersigned 
will seU at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 



self the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle: 
Description 
1981 Honda Accord 
Serial No. 
JHMSM5324BC139894 
Tidewato- Irhports, Inc. 
DBA HaU Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller \ 

159-4 IT 8/25 VB 



Classified Ads 



Index Of Classifieds 



1. AuMriwMitnts 

2. PtrswMit 
3.LMt«Po«m4 
4.AiitM 

S. Tiwks 

6.V«it 

7. Motercjrclas 

•.iMt* 

9. CMiptrs 
lO.IMpWantMl 

11. PMitloiH Wanted 

12. IwiiMu Optwrtimity 
13.Nts 

14. UvMtock 

15. Ap^ncM 
lS.ArticlnFarSalt 
17. Fumitiire 
18.Anti4iiti 
IS.IIcyclw 

20. MMkal Nittnimants 

21. Tatovtsien/StafM 
22.Jaw«lnr 

23. Cabn/Stamps/HobMtt 
24.WaiitadT«iiiy 
2S.6ao4TMiigstoEat 
21. EstartainiMiit 
27. 6ara|a/Yard Salat 
2S. Firtwoad ^L 

29. Lawa k Cardan 
iA. Farm C^uipmant 



31. Bttsinas* Eqiiipmaiit 

32. Btninaat Far Rant 

33. Apartmanti Far Rant 

34. Raamt Far Rant 

35. Hainaa Far Rant 

36. Raal Estata 
37LattFarSala 
3S.Mab»a Hamas 

39. Prafauianal Sarvicaa 

40. Sarvleas 

41. Carpantry 

42. Child Cara 

43. Cancrata/Masanry 

44. Elaetrical 

45. ExtarmimtinK 
40. Firaplaca* 

47. Kama Impravamant 

48. Instmction/EducatiaR 
49.MovincaHaulins 
50. Music Lassans 

51 Painting 

52. Pliatograpliy 

53. nana Tuning/RaiMir 

54. Rafrifaratian 

55. RanwdaUngfOacaratiiW 
56.SawingAAitaratian8 
57. Salar Eaargy 

SO. Tax Sarviea 
S9:EMhVe«lisd<'MtMi 
60. IHiscallanaaas 



4.AiitM 



4.AMtM 



VOLKSWAGON-1965, beauti- 
ful. 34 miles to the gallon. 
•950. Caa4«3-3621. 
4-4T-g-2 5 

VOLK8WAGON-1978, Con- 
vertable. air, am/fin stereo, ex- • 
ccUent condition, only 40,000 
miles, »7,000. CaU 421-9725. 
4-4T-g-25 

FORD - FfesU Qhia, 1978. air. 
am/fm stereo cassette, ex- 
cellent condition. Call anytime 
855-8166. 
4.3T-9 



xe>5 



2.P«reoaals 



3 



4.Aatot 



CREDIT PROBLEMS • 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 

Bad credit no problem. For 

free brochure call House of 

Credit, Toll free 1-800-442- 

15M. 

__: 2-4T-9/1 5 

CREDIT PROBLEMS7 

Reed>^ a Mastercard or'Visa^ 
Guaranteed, Bad credit no 
prqbkm. For Free Brochure 
call House of Credit. Toll Free 
1-800-442-1531 anytime. 

2-4T-9/15 

WANTBD - 28 overweight 
penoos for proven, rapid, safe, 
inexpensive weight loss 
propam. For appointmoit call 
877-3557 Newport News. 
24T-9/ g 

WANTED: UNUSUAL IdeiCs 
on any subject fat publication ii: 
book form. Share appor- 
tiointeiy in royalties received 
ovfT ao extended period of time. 
No investment necessary. 
C.O.I.. P.O. Box 5054, 
Cheaapeake, Va. 23324. 

MOT-9/15 



CHEVETTE - 

automatic, air, 
tion, excellent 
miles. S4,700. 
before 3 p.m. 



1982, 2 door, 
recent inspec- 
tires. 21.000 
Call 484-0270 

4-1T-8/2 5 



MAZDA - 1981 , OLC dehixe>: 
speed. Front wheel drive, 
AM/FM stereo, 15.000 miles, 
good conditimi, like new. 
Beige. $4,830. CaU 583-3240 
4-4T-9/1 5 

OLDSMOULE - 2980 Om^a, 
4 door, all available (qjtions of 
that year, extra clean. $5995. 
Call 482-4791. 

4-1T-8/25 

PONTIAC - 1990, Sunbird, 
automatic, sew tires, am radio 
with 2 good,<piaU^ qaeakais. 
fancy wheds. like new. Keal 
BdafiV. Afl^^ to apprKSM:^' 
$3,650 must seU. Call «9- 
3279. 
MT-9/15 

MERCEDES - 1980. 300TD, 
(wagon), white with blue in- 
toior, am/fm cassette, fully 
kwded. 15,000 miles, excellent 
condition. Exodlent ccmdition. 
$26,900. CaU evenings 340- 
1070. 

4-4T-9/15 



PONTIAC-1974. Orandville, 
new tires, new exhaust system, 
new battery, new water pump 
and new igniticHi syston. Very 
good condition. '700. Call 
547-1673 any time. 

44T-825 

DATSUN - 1973, 240Z, 4 
speed, AM/FM radio. Fair 
condition. Call 623-1191 
beftnv 12 noon and any time 
weekends. 

4-4T-8/2 5 

THUNDERBIRD - 1976. 

white on white, loaded, good 

condition. $2500. Call 425- 

7675. 

4-4T-8/25 

CADILLAC-1973 Fleetwood 
Bronghall, 4 door, tilt whed, 
split bench seats with 6 way 
power, am/fm 8 track stereo, 
electric anteima, plus much 
more. '1.295. CaH 545-7880 
for more mformation anytime. 
4-4T-8-25 



TO PLACE A 
CLASSIFIED 

AD 
CALL: 

486-3430 



DODGE-1981, Colt Deluxe. 

am/fm stereo, 4-speed twin 

stick, reclining seats, plus 

more. '4500 negotiable. Call 

428-6874. 

4-4T-9- 1 

MONTE CARLO - 1977, air, 
new tires, plus more. $2,200 or 
best offer. CaU 490-2052. 
4-1T.8/25 

DA1SON - 1974, 710 SUtion 
wagon, 4 cylinder, 4 speed, 
am/fm radio, good tires, S1250 
in god condition. QUI 545- 
3099 

4-4T-9/ 8 

VOLKSWAGON - 1976, Rab- 
bit. Automatic, am/fm. good 
tires, air, runs good $1250. 
Call 545-3099. 

4-4T-9/8 



THE BIG FLEA MARKET 
AND ANTIQUE SHOW 

at the Viiyiiiia BMch PavUioB 

(I9th Str^, 6 blocks from ocean) 

Featui^. hundreds of exhibitors from seven 
states. Sptwializing in antiques, collectables, 
second luuid items, crafts and much morel 

September 3rd, 4th, Sth 
Don't miss the .special preview opening 
Friday E-vcning. 7-10 P.M. 

Sal. 12-8, Sun. 12-6 
Admission, M. FreeParidng 



422-9500 



9/1/82 




CASHM 
ON THE 



SBC 



An ad in the Sun/Post 
Classin^s n Uke money 
in your pocket! Hiousan- 
ds of homes in the m^ro 
area i»e the Sun/Post 
Clasnfieds to bring buyen 
and sdlo-s t(^ether...and 
you'll have money to show 
f(X- it! Advertising is tN 
surMt way to And a buyer 
for your home, oir or fur- 
niture... there's always 
someone who wants 
YOUR unwanted itons. 
Phone in ^sm ad totkiyl 




VirginU Beach Sun, August 25, 1982 19 



Classified Ads 



4. ANtM 



It. I 



JEEP-Oovernment Surplus 
litfed for '3.196. Sdd for 
M4.00 for iiifoniutti<» ctU 1- 
312-93M961 ezt. 1447. 

4-4T-9- 1 

MAaeDA-OLC. 1978, S door, 
uttomatic. AM/FM. lir. ex- 
odiod conditkm. TI95. Qdl 
S57-4M1. 

- 4-4T-9- 1 

MEBCEDES - 1964. 190I>- 
Dienl. nediaidcally very good 
oHidttioii. Body tad b«ek leirt 
needs minor r^Mdr. $1,800 
cash. <M 397-3690. 
: 4^T-?/« 

HnCX-1973, Resal, 2 toot, 
new mufller, tail |Hpe and tiin- 
Df ^ain, MOOO n^otiable. 
CaD49&-2132. 
4^-8-25 

1971 OUM DtCONE • 390 cubic 
inch. Excdknt conditioa. 1230. 
547-7645. 

4TFN 



{.Tradit 



FOKD-1966 "pick-up 
EcoM^ne, new tires, wbc con-' 
ditioning, very dependaUe. 
•350. Call 347-1673 anytime. 
5-4T-9-23 



■AIA- 14H foot, iSOhpMa- 
cury, power . trim and tilt, 
gdve^Md ti^kr, lots of ex- 
tru. 8,000 or best (rffcr. CbB 
467-0267. 

»4ia^« 

SAIL BOAT - Cwooado, 23 
foot, 2 sails, 7.3 Memuy elec- 
tric start outboard, full gaD^, 
sleeps 3, roBer reding boom, 
an all US Coast Guard required 
equipment, many extras. 
$9»0. aU4M-«»M. 
8-4T-«/^ 

Ca.AlM1t>NE-16 foot, with 
J(Ansoas 100 horse power 
motw. •830. CaD 482-1236. 
8-4T-8-25 

BOAT - 13M foot fiberglaas, 
35 lq> erinnide motor with 
trailer. All for SI. 900, 
negotiible. Call 463-4350. 
hSUa 

LABSON-18 toot, y-6 ts^ue, 
CMC, 1/0, Cox tilt timler, 
siding or fldi^ has new star- 
ter, alternator, voltage 
rqjdator, orbontor. igritioii 
switch, stem drive, tad water 
pump completely rebuilt. 
•2M0 or best offer. CaU 485^ 
1031. 

8-4T^I 



7.M«twcycitt 






79 HONDA GL 

with gold trim. Comi^tetour 
kit. AM/FM stereo radio A 
cassette t^pe i^ayer. Cruise 
coouol garage kept. 11.300 
miks '3,300. Call 347-8413. af- 
ter 5p.m. 

7-TFN 



FRAN 
THE yiNYLMDY 

REVAIR 

Furaiture*Cvs 
• Boats • Restnimtt 
' Rfsidwitiw' * rn mmw r ial 

ALSO 

Re-Upholstery • Any MatCTial 

Df^ies • ^treads • Carp^ing 

FREE ESTIMATES 

468-5227 



APACHE MASA - All 

flber^ass pop up. ExoeOeat 
condition. Forced air ftamaoe, 
gas, electric, running water, 
sleeps 6. huulated, electric 
brains. Mu«sdl. $1,600. Ex- 
tra will be tiffown in. Cali61Z3- 
5827. 

9-4T-8/23 

WIDE CHOICE 

For a wide choke of buyers, 
renters, workers ia yow 
neighborhood, use low cost 
classified ads in your hometown 
newspaper. Get lesutts viicicl 



Remodeling Replace- 
ment Windows. Any 
Type of Inq^ovonolts. 
FweErt hftw . 
Itfl.BLA^L 



ATTENtlON 



Serious Job Seekers! 

Would yO« like to set your own noun with 
practically no limit on earnings and have 
vacations as desired? If so,, then why not 
conveniently work with us sMting/bandlins 
mail. Receive work and payinents by mail. 
Start immediately! For information, a 
self addressed, stamped envelope assures 
a prompt reply. ^ . 

Mail Marketing Services, 
P.O. Box 2590. Oscala, FL 32678 




TASSIFIED 






Sdling, renting or hiring? 
Sun/Post classifleds are the ans«^ 

Place you Idw cost, quick acting classified ad 
today. Call 4S6-3430orniafl the haady coupon. 
We're here to hdp'you wiUi your i^. 

20 words or less. 1 week, only H.00-4 weeks, 
only 'ILOO (The fourth week is free). YouradwOl 
run in each issue of the Virginia Beach Sun and 
Ches^eakePost. ^____^__^_^^_^ 



MyCtaMttMAd 



I 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 
People Planning 
Homes d Custom , 
Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 



lS.IMpWaHlid 



INSUIANCS AGENTS- 

IfemmAAwnat. Life. Heatt. 
, ap'^ot wnwiaHwid 
wtdOy paydfaqr. 
no debit, bhIIbiIiwI territory; 
IrfKge oofl^aaiea e^WBoing ui'> 
this area need 2 aseats, 

nBHlwIw vtvOwLmw, I^HBIiBK9« 

aatflXA'a. Ifyouvenotear- 
nbv HBO pto per wtA and 
you are wflfaig to work, send 
rcsnae to: I^uanoe la- 
vcst«»s, t2l R. Suayride 
Dri¥e. ^rgaia Bcw^ VA 
23464. 
101T-S4 

MACmNIST • Toot nd cutter 
griadsn, full and part time. 
CtU IMc To«4 Company, 
Han^toa. l-«26-«6«. 
10-lT-g/2S 

WANTID - Marketing 
r^resentittive total imaae. A 
Cattfomia dire^ to consumer 
fiimiseqwnfaiatoana. Ap- 
pUcairis matt be self Muters, 
motivated towards above 
cvcraae •cUevemcntt with a 
positive oi^ook. For appoin- 
tment caD l-<04-S77-35S7. 

HMT-9/g 

PA«T TIME - ACT II 
JEWELRY - Christmas cash. 
No hivestment, no ddivcry, 
SIO an hour. Car and phone 
Mecssary. Call F^an Rock. 
4C7-1S1S betweesi 2 and 6 pm 
osdy. 

\9-m-wv 

HELP WAN1»^ - Camp 
ground be^ warned, firing and 
summer apiriications now being 
acoepled for our n«istrati<M 
desk, sMMts, swimming pools, 
mafaitenanoe. outside grcmnds 
and recreatiooal fadlitics. Apply 
between 10 am. and 2 pm. Mon- 
day thru Thursday, Holday 
Tnvel Park, 1073 General Booth 
Bhd.. Virginia Beach, or caU 
425-0249. 
10 17 T 8-25 

i IrAW» NEBXD - for saics 
work. Car oeoessmy, fiexaUe 
hours. IdeU for young mothoi. 
Bam exceBent profits. Call 499- 
6734. 

lOTFN 

SOLVE MONEY WORRIES 

How' to he^ solve money 
worries! Let datsifkd ads in 
^>ur hometown newspaper sell 
tU^ you no kwger.oMd and 
canido without. Low «ost. and 
quiik acting! 



c^ 



HELP WANTra> - Grain 
Operator/meckaoic. Pay 
s^ed to experience and 
nhKadon. On and off jc^ con- 
tinued edncatun required. 
QiO Rnss Davis, Davis Ckaia 
Corporatioii. 543-2041 or 4S1- 
0667 

IMLS& 

SALES PEUCm - N e ed e d to 
hdp market and distribute 
pnMhKtt. C^ after 3 at 495- 
6188 1^ for Pete, or caU Mark 
at«7-6188. Thank Yon. 
IMLg/S 

HELPfl-9 year old needs 
someone nice who does not 
holler to take care of me at ray 
house when mom and dad go to 
work. Hows vary from 6 a.m. 
to 8 a.m. and 3 pjn. to 3 pju. 
C^ 486-8311 after lO-JOaan. 
1&4T-9^1 



11. 



HOUSEKEEPER - Call Mrs. 
Newman for more infor- 
mation. 387-0818. 
11-4T-9/8 

CmOERLY MAN - will care 
fm- man, has eipcrienoe private 
duty, days or ni^^tts. wiB ttve in 
OT out. CUl 345-1904. 

I1-4T-9/8 

SECRETARIAL WORK - 
l^toture, well qualified lady 
with excdknt work Ustory and 
references, desires permanent 
part-time employment. Areas 
of particular interest - STOCK 
BROKERAGE, LAW. 
l^ifEDlCAL, REAL ESTATE. 
INSURANCE and MOTEL 
OFFICES - Beach area only 
Phone 467-9661. 
11-4T-9/ 1 

COMPANION - Reliable 
female to care for elderty, wiD 
do general house hold duties. 
Have car will do errands. Nor- 
folk area. Qdl 440-9467. 

IMLSai 

GENERAL CLEANING - 

Homes or offices. Call Ruth or 
Debbie at 420-5049 or 547- 
4619, between 8 A 4. 

n-4T-9/15 



13. Pels 



KITTENS - Free to a good 
home. CaU 464-7039. 
13.1T-8/2S 

PETS-Please he^ us 1^ giving 
a loving pet a home. We are a 
iMm-profit organization, but 
we will gladly take donations. 
We are in need of Fost« Iteen- 
teforourpett. neaseca0497- 
7630, ttl-6654 or 3994321 if 
you can help. Animal 
Assistance League. 

I^TFN 



GEIllUU.ISPJyRS 



SANDERS 

420-9606 



DP^MMt 

Please run ad for ( } 1 week, ( ) 4 we^ or ( } 
undlstopped. Cost is (la-OO for 4 werics for firA 



None. 
Ad(b«ss. 

, caty 

Sate 

Zip 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 

I 

I 

I 



I 

I 
I 

I 

I 
I 



ATTENTIONII 

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR 
FULLTIME EMPLOYMENT. CALL 547-2177, 

Mr. Hcplcr BETWEEN 8 & 9 AM. 



YOUR INSURANCE LICENSE 

MAY BE WORTH MORE THAN 

YOU THINK. 

No pr(»pecting. 

30 set appointmeiits per week. 

*S0O plus weekly commissions. 

CaU 499-3515 



13. Ms 



17. 



42. CUM Cart 



WIKBD HAIKED 

DACHSHUND - Needs 
loving home. Very sweet and 
obediemdog. House broken. 
No duUrai, gets along w^ 
with other animals. Call 
anytime 464-3694 or Ml-6654. 
ANIMAL ASSISTANCE 
LEAGUE. 
___1ML2/" 

nriTANY SPANIEL - Ex- 
cellent hunting stock. 7 
females, 3 males. Wormed, 1st 
sbou. SIOO. >5^38S3. 

13-4T-9/8 



IS. 



UVING BOCM WT . t 

pieces, like new. Bm QKiag 
and mattress, fuB size, like 
new. Knette s« with four 
chavs. All reason^ile. CaU 
487-4S58. 

IMOas 

DINING BO<Hi SUITE - 

Ethan Allen. Oval aUiQUC 
pine. 40* X 60" |4hs 3 12" 
leaves. 4 ladder bwdc duiii. 
$700 negotiabte. CaU 853- 
52:». 

iHT-ff/y 

COUCH AND CaAOt-Oreea 

iriaid, early AmericaD, A-1 
condition, 1200. StenoandTV 
stand, '10. Can 543-1769. 

17.4T-9-i 



hrMnONT HEAIKHJAR- 
TEBS • Great Bridge. 4 
loctiiosn, one and 2 bctkoom 
siptitacBts. From *li60. Rental 
office. 40-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 
_____^ 33TFN 

GBEEN SUN - ADULT 
LIVING near Oceana A Dam 
Nidi. 1,2 ft 3 bedroom apu., 
also townhouses with i»ivate 
ptHot, swimming pool and toi- 
Ws^'ccMrts. Short term lease 
•vaflaUe. Heat and hot water in- 
doded. RenU start u '320. Hie 
PfaMS. 468-2000. 

33TFN 



CHIU> CAIE-Charlestown- 
Kempsville area. Mature 
dep^dalrie person, expoien- 
ced. I will take care of your 
diildren, all ages in my home. 
Meal and soKks provi<kd, 
playroom, fenced yard. 
Anytime. Weekly rate, '35, 2 
cfaUdrcs 'SO. '1 hourly rate for 
drop4ns. CaU 495-1684. 

42-4T-9-1 



47. 



WAIHING MACHINE-Need 

timer. '50. CaD anytime. 464- 

3694. 

15~4T-9- l 

An CONDITiONEIS^,000 

BTU's to 22.000 BTU's. All 
RCtmditiooed. '135 to •235. 
Call anytime 468-2828. 

15-4T-9- 1 

CAKFET-ir X 21'. Ught 
green, thick, short shag. *200. 
Can 467-9704. 
I5-4T-9- 1 

WASHEK-Kenmore. voy 

good cowfition. '125. Dryer. 

Eeomore. very good cmidition, 

'125. 

15-4T-8-2 5 

■EFUGEBATOE-1 side by 
ade '195. 1 two door '185. 2 
air conditioners. 8«000 BTU. 
•ISO and 18,000. '185. Ken- 
more washer '85. Amana 
Freoer '165. CaU 588-1084. 
15-4T-8-2 5 

MKSOWAVE OVEN - Never 
used, S500 or best offer. CaU 
853-1081. 

15-1T-8/25 

WASHING MACHINE - and 

refrigerator. Good condition. 
CaU4M-9659. 

msii 

, KD-Sears, electric adjusu- 
fkx. exceUent condition, '550. 
Adding machine, (Xivetti Un- 
derwood, good condition. '35. 
AdjustaUe bed rails. 'SO. CaU 
627-43IOafitf3p.m. 

li^T-8-25 



M. 



FarRiMt 



It. 



LEATHER CHADt - 15 years 
old. Black, made by dove 
Manufacturing Company, Ukc 
new. $475. Qdl 853-5228. 

ANTIQUE FUSNITUIE - 

Early 20th century, dining 
room suite. Breakfrom, ser- 
ver, and ttkie. Mahogany is 
Duncan Phyfe design. S1300. 
Can 463-3139. Afta6p.m. 
lfcSLSZ« 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike. Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
necklaces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
granby St., 625-91 19. Daily 10-5. 
18TFN 



CHESAPEAKE BEACH - 

FtaraidMd room with private 
bMh m the water. CaU 460- 
3458anytime. 
34-1T-8/25 



MA1E NEEDED - 

Fem^ to share with female, 
mntwe, w^wnsibte, individual 
to share my townhouse. Prder 
a non-smoker and enjoy 
•almals. $185 plus half 
jOtOities. Avaflable Sq>tember 
1ft. CaU 490-2653 after 5:30 



34-4T-9/8 



3S.I«riEstatt 



P.O. ■« 1327 



South DriTe-In Theatre 

Flea Market 

C3tes«|ieake, Va. 
VMdoi FREE: 



7:Ma.m.toA^ 

I Mud ft dm Rslrooa» 




19. 



MENS U SPEra> - Western 
Flyer. Good condtion. $65. 
CaU 468-01 19. 

19.1T-8/25 



HOUSE mm. SALE - Virginia 
BaKh. 7 blocks from ocean, 9 
room home, 4 bedroom, sun 
room, aluminum siding, Dutch 
Colonial. Only $15,000 down 
and assume 1st and 2nd non 
ESC loans. $670 a month. 
Owner wiU finance balance 
10%. Owner/agent Jerry . CaU 
3404100^42241253. 

36-4T-9/8 



20.llMinl 



ICArtklMFw-Salt 



i 



CLARINET - Conn, good 
condition. $30.00. CaU 464- 
3694. 

30-1T.8/25 

VIOLIN-Made in Germany, 
mid 1800's. soft torn, perfect 
for intimate setting w student 
home use. '400. CaU 499- 
1842 after 6 p.m. 

20-rr-9-i 



BMHONG SXVICE -including' 
^t^tarterly payroU reports and 
bask account reconciliation. 
SpcdaUzing in smaU ixopreitor- 
diips. Pick up and deUvery. 
Retired (WofessionaL CaU 420- 
5624. 

39TFN 



..ptRIElffAL'-BUO' -"HSiad'-^^' 
bade in India, Chinese design, 
never used, 1 1 ^ foot by 8 foot. 
$600. CaU34(M)l228. 

16-1T-8/23 

BEFBIGEBATOB-$250. 

XLIOO motorcycle. '275. CaU 
46(M)793. 

16-41-9-1 



BOOKKEEPING-Monthly 

balance sheet, P ft L. detaUed 
trial balance from your checks 
and recdpU. stubs, or register 

M.JVanMblBiBB»<iun|iu!|0 jtH/^tS^bOetlC (HMsfdttMl^' 

Payables'.* 
payroll. 
CaU 420- 



-TTm 



■*'^"moirf8fyV''45.' 
CASH PAID - Virginia Beach receivable, small 



17. Fnitim 



Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clodu, 
glassware, lamps, china, oO pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
m entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU ^2-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



Chesapeake 
6623. 



only. 



39-TFN 






FUBNITUBE-Bookcase. mat- 
tress, box^iring, office chairs, 
aiqriiances, dresser, dinette set, 
end tables, marble top coffee 
taMe, smaU desk, beds. smaU 
enamel tables, lamps, vacuum 
deaner. Lafayctu 9iores area. 
Can 623-0693. 
■ 17-4T-9- 1 

i gmiBI I B ANEANJeAoom 
sdte 5 piece, lri|fc dresser with 
nnrror, double dressa, bed 
with heaAoaid. 2 ni^ studs. 
•690 or best offer. C^ 464- 
2550 afor 5:30. 
17-4T-9- 1 

FUBNITUBE Pecan 
bed ro om set, sofa, hercukm 
redlner, rugs, aO in good con- 
iMtiosi. Very reasonaUe. CaU 
853-9322. 
17-4T-9/15 

aOfA KD - Queen, loose 
pOowSigoodcooditiaa. $175. 
Ctf481-«808. 

17-1T-8/25 

COUCH - And Love seat, her- 
edkm. ExteBwit conditiaii. 
$500. Can 853-9377. 

17-1T-8/25 

SOTAKD - like new, oort 
1400 ori^naUy, wffl sett for 

saoo.Qdle^7S36. 

. 17-1T-8/25 

3 nECE 8(HJD TEAKW006 

Sereo C^>iH« - 8r ' long, lou OS 
stmge VMM for tapes and 
leoords. Hm Sony red-to-red 
t^x dedc Md S(»y rccd^w 
SR60S0, 30 «wttt pa channd. 2 
Ssmsri spencers. 9^2000. ^Mce 
in oMnet for tunHaUe. AB for 

wo.cuns-mi. 

17TFN 



c 



9ft VBteff#^fa^i^s( 



FOR SALE-70 bUroom 
lessons. CaU Larry Dunn for 
more information 480-2154. 

»-TFN 



29.Umi&«w*B 



JOYNEB PBOFESSIONAl 
LANDSCAPING and kwn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-^49. * 
29*0^ 

MULCH-BUTIAt AND SON 

Siredded wood and bark har- 
dwood, truckload. any siu. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
whik on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-74«7. 

29TFN 



TYPING 8EBVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonable rates. CaU dtho- 
467-7112, KempsviUe area, or 
4(3-0236, HUltop/Pemlvoke - 
ea. 

401i.N 

BOOKUXPEB - WiU do books 
in my hmae. Expermicedi in 
'payrod and quarterly returns. 
Pick-up and deUvery so-vke. 
CaU 545-4096 after 5 p.m. Tor 
moreinfwmation and rates. 

40TFH 



ADDITIONS - Rooms, garages, 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2511 anytime. 

47TFN 

A-1 ADOmON 
BEMODELING-Garage con- 
vcrnons. custom decks, 
repairs, etc. Free estimates. 
CaU anytime 463-6735. 
47-4T-8-2 S 

ADDITIONS, ROOMS- 

carpentry. roofing, siding, 
storm window, storm doors, 
plastoing. dectric, concrete 
' work, plumbing, guttering, 
, remodding, kitehen and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluminum siding, firplaces, 
carpeting painting, specializing 
in parking areas and driveways, 
aU type of demolition, free 
estimate without obUgation, 
prompt service. Serving aU of 
TIdewatCT. B<mded and In- 
sured, State Registered. CaU 
625-7433, 623-6148, or 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 

WALL PAPER HANGER - 

Professional work. Reasonable 

rates, go hand and hand with me. 

Free estimaes, large or smaU 

jobs. Gail Kdth after 5. 547- 

3764. 

47TFN 

ADDITIONS AND IM- 
PROVEMENTS - Dens, garages, 
kitchens, bathrooms, etc. 
QuaUty work at reasonable rates. 
Free estimates and references 
furnished upon request. AU work 
guaranteed by state licensed con- 
tractor. Call Bill Monette, 481- 
2201. 
47TFN 

HOME REPAIRS - Additions, 
no middleman, licenses, lifetime 
^ resident of Virginia Beach. Class 
".a' 'remodding. carpentry, 
masonry, etc. Plans drawn. 
Quality workmanship at 
reasonable prices. Guaranteed. 
No job too smaU. Call John 
Gaut, II at 464-4392 or 463-2287 
after 3:00 p.m. 

I 47TFN 

AWNINGS, STORM WIN- 
DOWS, doors, patio covers, 
siding, guttering and fendng. 
Order now before the spring 
rush. American Awning Co., 
'4231 Portsmouth Blvd. 488- 
0000. 

4-'TFN 



51. 



41. 



^. 

CABPENTBY, PAINTING. 
BOfWlNG - and aU types of 
majut— ,«■> Storm wiixlows, 
^ttos and screens repaired. 
n'ee estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 4204453. 

4ITFN 



32.lBslMssFtrll«rt 



42.CMMCW* 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING - Fast and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 
51TFN 

PAINTING - Lar^ or smaH 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
inices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
waUpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51TFN 



OUTSTANDING OPPOB- 
TUNITY-In solar heating 
business. High profit. 
Minimum investment '14,000. 
C^ 425-7792. 
32H<t.«-25 

UNJNGE F(» SALB^S^OO 

iod assume, icriou 
OQV,can^-6«21. 
3MWS 

STowia AND snmAict 

ABEAS - AH ma. PnyartiN 
unlimited. Marvin Otri^ktb. 
399^90.484-1273. 

321TN 



Wh^ SoiB^Mi^ Ncccb 
Bo^ii^ or I^irirfd, Yon Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

H<»iie ImprovoxMit 

q^edalist 

,_ r*lloo6*ClKpQrtg*i 

• Bitti Bcmodded • Soon AddWoM 
k SMv • Uttiia Kienodded 

545-7318 




CHILD CABS-My home. 
Tidewater and CromweU Road. 
Fenced yard, toddlers 
prefRred, 2 playrooms, 
artfitious Bmalt mid snacks 
provided. 001855-6820. 
424T-9- 1 

CaiLOCABE - In my home 
(Deep CTeek-Chesapeake( 
saadu teduded, 
; woridiv with 
~ aice pit^ area. One 
S25, two AOdren $40. 
CU487-4I79. 

^dSssas 

CULOCABE - anytime, In- 
Riwr Road area. 2 

KIPBt'M^v*^ 

C^H^M 420^23. 
42-4T-9/8 



BATHROOM REMODELING - 

Old and ndw. ^wcializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covCTing. Reas<mable rates. Free 
estimates. 20 years experien^ in 
Tidewato- area. Small ami lar^ 
jobs. Guarantee dl work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

55TFN 



Se.SMHRgtAltoraliM» 



SEAMTBKS-The following 
services sue avaihMe: tailoring 
alterations, and or original 
de^i. By appmitmem c«dy. 
Please can 398-9194. 

S6-4T-8-25 



J 



NOW OPEN! 

TMeimter Tnidi^ Center 
14%ftriaMdgeMvi. 
CbcnpMke, Virghite 

Articles WiMed. Cona^HMnfti Acceixed. 



Divt s^2i« wi-tsm m^^m-^m 



^imtm 



VlWMi 



20 Virginia Beach Sun, August 23, 1982 




THINK OF 'EM AS 




•*.. 



NOT TRASH! 



V I 



Yes, Anheuser- Busch 
will Pay You Cash 

OnThe Spot For Empty 
Aluminum Cans of 
Any Kind. 



to rn iilfU V for every pound (about 
24) of aluminum cans you recycle. 

It's an easy way to earn extra money for your 
club, favorite charity or yourself. 

Turn what could be trash Into cash and clean 
up while you're cleaning up! 






Hoffman Beverage Co. 
5464 Greenwich Road 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

PHONE: 499-1234 



w 



Add Fitness To Your Future 




There's a new way to make fitness fun. Ifs the Parcourse Circuit on the grounds 
of Leigh Memorial Hospital This new exercise course is designed to give you a 
complete physical workout 

How much does it cost? Ifs absolutely free and no registration is required. The 
course is open to the public every day during dcajlight hours. 

Each of the 18 stations is medically designed for stretching , strengthentig, or 
cardiovascular conditioning. In fact, the entire family can participate blouse 
each exercise has three fitness levels. 

Tiy Leigh Memorud's new Pwrourse taui (M fUness to your fut^ 




Leigh Memorial HosiOal • 830 Kemf^i^ilk Road • Norfolk 



m> 



Near ffte Koger Executive Center 



<r 



"Men Runmg" 

PhotoOidt 

Eadwetmi Mtq/brk^ 

(1830-1904)